Reduced flight schedules and current entry / exit requirements

antipodean

Registered

Here is a good summary of the recently reduced flight schedules announced by each airline currently operating to Argentina as well as all you need to know about travelling to and from Argentina at the moment.

Note your country of origin or destination may have additional requirements which you can check on the link provided.

(Google translation below)

Departure from Argentina
  • Complete the Electronic Sworn Declaration, of discharge, on the website of the National Directorate of Migration .
  • Any traveler can leave Argentina, take into account the requirements of the final destination to which they are going. You can verify it at the following link: IATA Travel .
Entry to Argentina
Argentine citizens and residents:
  • Have an RT-PCR / PCR test , carried out a maximum of 72 hours before the flight, otherwise they will not be able to enter the flight.
  • Complete the Electronic Affidavit on the website of the National Directorate of Migration .
  • Upon arrival in Argentina, mandatory isolation (quarantine) of 7 or more days at destination, up to a total of 10 days computed from the collection of the PCR sample at origin, to be carried out at the address declared by the traveler.
The following persons are excepted to carry out an RT-PCR / PCR test:
  1. Under 6 years of age.
  2. Travelers with 6 years or more who have had positive COVID-19, in the 90 days prior to entering the country, must prove the results of diagnostic tests and add the medical discharge after more than 10 days have passed since the diagnosis.
  3. Carriers and crew.
IMPORTANT !
  • The possibility, provided for in Administrative Decision No. 2252/2020, of submitting a medical certification in replacement of the PCR test, is applicable only to cases where, due to local peculiarities, PCR results cannot be obtained within the deadlines established by the rule. Therefore, to know the countries where the test is mandatory, you can enter the following link: PCR OBLIGATORY - COUNTRIES
  • The only diagnostic test accepted for entry to Argentina is the PCR type . Other types of diagnostic tests are not valid, such as antigen, serological, or others.
Non-Resident Foreigners who are direct relatives of Argentine citizens or residents (Spouse, Brother / sister, Children or Parents):
  • Complete the Electronic Affidavit on the website of the National Directorate of Migration .
  • Medical assistance insurance that includes confinement and isolation benefits for COVID-19, and that has no exclusions or limitations during the entire stay, regardless of age.
  • Have an RT-PCR / PCR test, carried out a maximum of 72 hours before the flight, otherwise they will not be able to enter the flight.
    • Except :
      • Under 6 years of age.
      • Travelers with 6 years or more who have had positive COVID-19, in the 90 days prior to entering the country, must prove the results of diagnostic tests and add the medical discharge after more than 10 days have passed since the diagnosis.
      • Carriers and crew.
  • Upon arrival in Argentina, mandatory isolation (quarantine) of 7 or more days at destination, up to a total of 10 days computed from the collection of the PCR sample at origin, to be carried out at the address declared by the traveler.
  • Documentation that proves the direct link with an Argentine citizen or with a foreigner residing in Argentina:
    • Children / parents : Birth certificate, duly apostilled.
    • Spouses : Marriage certificate, duly apostilled.
    • Brothers : Birth certificate of the brother and the traveler, duly apostilled.
    • Registered de facto couples : Certificate of stable partnership or formalized union, duly apostilled.
    • Couples not married or registered : Declaration of declaration made before a notary and two witnesses where the couple's relationship is recorded. When one of the members of the couple is in Argentina and the other is abroad, each one must prepare a separate certificate, and both must be presented to the airline. The minutes made in Argentina must be legalized by the College of Notaries. Minutes made abroad must be apostilled
  • Copy of the Argentine DNI or Argentine passport, or of the Argentine DNI for Foreigners, of the relative who is accompanying or who needs to visit.
  • Round trip ticket reservation , with departure from the country within 90 days.
  • Request note where the need for the visit, dates of departure and return, place where the foreigner will stay and all other relevant information is briefly explained.
  • Non-resident foreigners who enter the country on a temporary basis to visit relatives under Provision DNM 3763/2020 will pay a fee of ARS 9,000 per foreigner upon arrival , as stipulated in article 1, subsection m), of Decree 865 / 2019.
Other cases
Any non-resident foreigner who needs to travel to Argentina for reasons other than those of the previous points (for example, long-term visas; temporary technical / professional tasks; long-term jobs; medical studies; etc.) should go directly to the following link: Visas for foreigners ; to learn about the various specific requirements for each category.
 

Greg S

Registered
Thanks for the information!

Here's something to ponder: I'm a USA citizen who lives half year in CABA; I have an apartment there now. Because I'm only a tourist, I can't return. But on Feb 19, I'll get my second dose of the Pfizer vaccine. So by March 19 or so, I should be reasonably protected. I'm wondering if "vaccine tourism" will ever be a reality. I'm happy to do a quarantine upon arrival.
 

antipodean

Registered
Thanks for the information!

Here's something to ponder: I'm a USA citizen who lives half year in CABA; I have an apartment there now. Because I'm only a tourist, I can't return. But on Feb 19, I'll get my second dose of the Pfizer vaccine. So by March 19 or so, I should be reasonably protected. I'm wondering if "vaccine tourism" will ever be a reality. I'm happy to do a quarantine upon arrival.
One day it will likely count for something, but at the moment it is off the radar of this government who is dealing with a myriad of more immediate issues beyond tourism. In fact they seem to be more focused on new subsidy packages for the sector rather than rehabilitating it while also further restricting foreign travel - suggesting we are still in for a long ride ahead in terms of being able to welcome foreign tourists again (at a minimum, I would suggest at least until after vaccine based travel is trialed, tested and normalized between first world countries with large numbers of vaccinated persons such as UK-US etc.)
 

Greg S

Registered
One day it will likely count for something, but at the moment it is off the radar of this government who is dealing with a myriad of more immediate issues beyond tourism. In fact they seem to be more focused on new subsidy packages for the sector rather than rehabilitating it while also further restricting foreign travel - suggesting we are still in for a long ride ahead in terms of being able to welcome foreign tourists again (at a minimum, I would suggest at least until after vaccine based travel is trialed, tested and normalized between first world countries with large numbers of vaccinated persons such as UK-US etc.)
Thanks again. What I figured. I'll be hanging out in Mexico City until then. Mex City is basically LA South; I can walk to 17 different Starbucks from my AirBnB in Polanco, which is all sorts of wrong in a country with a huge peasant population. FYI, the USA vaccine process is ramping nicely and in some areas is extremely well run. I receive my jabs in Seminole County, Fl. Best wishes to all in CABA.
 

rickulivi

Registered
Thanks for the information!

Here's something to ponder: I'm a USA citizen who lives half year in CABA; I have an apartment there now. Because I'm only a tourist, I can't return. But on Feb 19, I'll get my second dose of the Pfizer vaccine. So by March 19 or so, I should be reasonably protected. I'm wondering if "vaccine tourism" will ever be a reality. I'm happy to do a quarantine upon arrival.
My wife and I are also getting our second vaccine of Pfizer on Feb. 18 in the USA. What is not clear yet is we will be still required to perform a CRP test or will showing the vaccination card enough? Any clues?

For others, the vaccine process in California, where we took it, was amazing. Super well organized, very efficient, super friendly, and in and out in less than 15 minutes, even though we were hundreds of 65+ folks. The line moved super fast.
 

antipodean

Registered
My wife and I are also getting our second vaccine of Pfizer on Feb. 18 in the USA. What is not clear yet is we will be still required to perform a CRP test or will showing the vaccination card enough? Any clues?

For others, the vaccine process in California, where we took it, was amazing. Super well organized, very efficient, super friendly, and in and out in less than 15 minutes, even though we were hundreds of 65+ folks. The line moved super fast.
If eligible to enter Argentina you would still need a negative PCR result to be able to board a flight and be admitted to the country (or proof of COVID infection within 90 days and all related documentation.)

There are currently no considerations of vaccinations in these rules.
 

Greg S

Registered
My wife and I are also getting our second vaccine of Pfizer on Feb. 18 in the USA. What is not clear yet is we will be still required to perform a CRP test or will showing the vaccination card enough? Any clues?

For others, the vaccine process in California, where we took it, was amazing. Super well organized, very efficient, super friendly, and in and out in less than 15 minutes, even though we were hundreds of 65+ folks. The line moved super fast.
I’m hoping that an app like Verifly, which American Airlines now requires, eventually includes vaccine info. Some countries are using it, and Spain, Greece and a few other EU destinations are discussing a similar vaccine passport. Eventually test/vaccine status could be incorporated into US passport databases, like Trusted Traveler is now. Although I see private tech companies doing this far sooner than the Feds—and there is bound to be serious pushback from privacy advocates. Then again, maybe the illusion of privacy will finally die with the rise of these endless pandemics.

But the hospitality industry is an enormous global employer, so hotels, airlines, restaurants etc are pushing for reasonably reopened borders. who knows? But I’d like to think there is some way to devise a new normal. The old one is long gone, I’m afraid.
 

Greg S

Registered
I’m hoping that an app like Verifly, which American Airlines now requires, eventually includes vaccine info. Some countries are using it, and Spain, Greece and a few other EU destinations are discussing a similar vaccine passport. Eventually test/vaccine status could be incorporated into US passport databases, like Trusted Traveler is now. Although I see private tech companies doing this far sooner than the Feds—and there is bound to be serious pushback from privacy advocates. Then again, maybe the illusion of privacy will finally die with the rise of these endless pandemics.

But the hospitality industry is an enormous global employer, so hotels, airlines, restaurants etc are pushing for reasonably reopened borders. who knows? But I’d like to think there is some way to devise a new normal. The old one is long gone, I’m afraid.
Verifly in action at Denver airport...
 
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