Rentista visa and some other questions

UraniumFever

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Buenos Dies (this is pretty much the extent currently of my Spanish, apologies...),

I'm an American citizen (24) who is looking to move to South America in the near future (I currently have been living in Russia for 2.5 years but y'all can obviously see how that's going so I'm planning to get the heck out of here...) and Argentina is on the list due to the rentista visa.

I have a permanent annuity (from a structured settlement) in the amount of around 1600 dollars a month, which opens up the possibility to Ecuadorian, Peruvian and Argentinian residency.

My questions are:

1. I've heard that for an Argentina rentista visa, the required amount is stated as being 30,000 pesos a month. I'm currently getting (at the bank rate) 171,000 a month. Would this be a sufficient amount to prove stable income?

2. Western Union shows that they make wire transfers to Argentina but give the blue dollar rate. Is this correct?

3. How much does it cost to rent in the center of Buenos Aires? Would it be possible for $500 at the blue dollar rate or even more?

I appreciate any information you guys can give me!
 

UraniumFever

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Another question: Do I need to have an apostilled letter showing proof of persistent income, or can I show bank statements from the last two years that show this income?

If this isn't necessary, would depositing a large amount into an Argentinian bank account work? I see one thing showing that the requirement can be met by depositing 30000 pesos, lets say I deposited 600000 or more, would that work?
 

steveinbsas

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1. I've heard that for an Argentina rentista visa, the required amount is stated as being 30,000 pesos a month. I'm currently getting (at the bank rate) 171,000 a month. Would this be a sufficient amount to prove stable income?
 

steveinbsas

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Another question: Do I need to have an apostilled letter showing proof of persistent income, or can I show bank statements from the last two years that show this income?

If this isn't necessary, would depositing a large amount into an Argentinian bank account work? I see one thing showing that the requirement can be met by depositing 30000 pesos, lets say I deposited 600000 or more, would that work?You will need to "prove" to migraciones satisfaction that you are receiving whatever level of income they currently require. The income must be passive and stable (from invetments, real estate, or a trust).

You will need to "prove" to migrationes satisfaction that you are receiving the level of income they currently require.

Income must be passive and stable (from investments, real estate, or a trust).

Any document you provide (execpt your passport) must have the Apostille and, as far as I know, the Apostille can be made for any document that has a signature that has been notarized. Bank statements cannot receive Apostille, but any document with a notarized signature can be Apostilled.

I provided migrations with US bank statements with a cover letter signed by a bank official. The letter confirmed that the origin of the deposits was an irrecoverable trust. I also asked the attorney who created the trust to write a letter explaining that the income would continue for the rest of my life. I attached a copy of the trust to the letter.

Both letters were signed and notarized and (with their supporting documents) received the Apostille. I had them translated into Spanish in Argentina by an approved translator before presenting them to migracioes Everything was accepted exactly as presented.

The trust which generated my passive monthly income had already been in force for five years prior to my applying fot temporary residency in Argentina, so migracioes had no questions or doubts about the source of my income.

PS: You will not be able to open an Argentine bank account until after you receive temporary residency (the visa rentista), so you will not be able to make any deposits in an Argentine bank account before your visa is granted.

If you want to move to a country that will give you permision to live year round based on just having money in a foregin bank, I suggest Mexico.
 
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steveinbsas

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I have a permanent annuity (from a structured settlement) in the amount of around 1600 dollars a month, which opens up the possibility to Ecuadorian, Peruvian and Argentinian residency.
As long as you can "prove" this to migraciones satifaction, as well as satisfy the criminal background requirments, you should be able to get temporary resdiency in Argentina without any difficulty.

Migraciones might actually put you in the category of visa pensionada rather than the visa rentista, but as long as you get temporary residnecy it won't make any difference to you.
 

UraniumFever

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As long as you can "prove" this to migraciones satifaction, as well as satisfy the criminal background requirments, you should be able to get temporary resdiency in Argentina without any difficulty.

Migraciones might actually put you in the category of visa pensionada rather than the visa rentista, but as long as you get temporary residnecy it won't make any difference to you.
Thank you for the information!

About my other question, how much does it cost in pesos usually to rent in the center of Buenos Aires?
 

steveinbsas

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Thank you for the information!

You are most welcome!
About my other question, how much does it cost in pesos usually to rent in the center of Buenos Aires?
You can search websites for rental rates in the various neighborhoods of CABA.

Few expats choose to live in the center (aka El Centro) as it is (what I woud call) a "Dead Zone" at night.

There are several sections of Palermo that you will undoubtedly enjoy much more.

Depending on how soon you are planning to get our or Russia and move to South America, I suggest youtry to get a "criminal background report" from the Rusian government before leaving.

The report will be required to get a resident visa in Argentina or an FM3 permit to live year round in Mexico.

I imagine the other countires you are considering moving to would also require this background check.

In Argentina, the report must be dated no more than 90 days prior to the day it is presented to migraiones with the rest of the required docs.

I seriously doubt they will make an exception if you cannot get one from Russia,

In that case, I imagine a clever individual could try to "game the system" and get a new passport from the American Embassy in Buenos Aires after arriving here and then "losing" their passport.

I imagine migraciones would most likley assume that person came here from the USA and would have no way to know if they "lived" in any other countries prior to thier arrival in Argentina, as the only information in migraciones database would be the date of thatindividual's first arrival nad the rest of the passport would be blank.

In that case,(unless Argentine migraciones has access to an international database) the individual would only be required to provide a criminal background report from the FBI in the USA.

PS: Based on posts I've read in this forum, even if you have not lived in the USA for more than three years, and you are able to get the report from the Russian government, Argentine migraciones will most likely require the FBI report as well.

Regardless of where you end up relocating, I suggest you come directly to Argentina and apply for the visa pensionada ASAP
 

UraniumFever

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You are most welcome!

You can search websites for rental rates in the various neighborhoods of CABA.

Few expats choose to live in the center (aka El Centro) as it is (what I woud call) a "Dead Zone" at night.

There are several sections of Palermo that you will undoubtedly enjoy much more.

Depending on how soon you are planning to get our or Russia and move to South America, I suggest youtry to get a "criminal background report" from the Rusian government before leaving.

The report will be required to get a resident visa in Argentina or an FM3 permit to live year round in Mexico.

I imagine the other countires you are considering moving to would also require this background check.

In Argentina, the report must be dated no more than 90 days prior to the day it is presented to migraiones with the rest of the required docs.

I seriously doubt they will make an exception if you cannot get one from Russia,

In that case, I imagine a clever individual could try to "game the system" and get a new passport from the American Embassy in Buenos Aires after arriving here and then "losing" their passport.

I imagine migraciones would most likley assume that person came here from the USA and would have no way to know if they "lived" in any other countries prior to thier arrival in Argentina, as the only information in migraciones database would be the date of thatindividual's first arrival nad the rest of the passport would be blank.

In that case,(unless Argentine migraciones has access to an international database) the individual would only be required to provide a criminal background report from the FBI in the USA.

PS: Based on posts I've read in this forum, even if you have not lived in the USA for more than three years, and you are able to get the report from the Russian government, Argentine migraciones will most likely require the FBI report as well.

Regardless of where you end up relocating, I suggest you come directly to Argentina and apply for the visa pensionada ASAP
I have a few Russian visas in my passport, each dating for a year and only two arrival stamps and one exit stamp, so I'd assume they know that I have been here for a year? With the new passport idea, I'm assuming that they'd still know as I only have three interpol entrance notifications (I'm assuming), One for Russia 2.5 years ago, one for UAE about 6 months ago, and one more for Russia 6 months ago.

I will get the FBI one in any case.

Why do you recommend moving immediately?

Is Argentinian citizenship a good thing to have by the way? As far as I've read, after 1 year of living in Argentina, I could already apply for citizenship? If I have the rentista visa, know Spanish and have spent the full required 2 years in Argentina, I should have no issue getting citizenship, correct?
 

steveinbsas

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I have a few Russian visas in my passport, each dating for a year and only two arrival stamps and one exit stamp, so I'd assume they know that I have been here for a year? With the new passport idea, I'm assuming that they'd still know as I only have three interpol entrance notifications (I'm assuming), One for Russia 2.5 years ago, one for UAE about 6 months ago, and one more for Russia 6 months ago.

If an Interpol report will satisfy migraciones, you won't have to deal with the Rusian governemt if that isn't easy or desirable . Hopefully, the Interpool report will satisfy migraciones and it will be easy to get.

I will get the FBI one in any case.

I think that's wise. If you can send your fingerprints to the FBI even before your arrival in Argentina. you will be ahead of the game. The FBI report must be Apostilled (certified) in the USA and I believe it must be sent to an address in the USA as well.

If you don't know someone who can send it to you in Argentina, there are businesses that can.

Just keep in ind that it only "valid" for 90 days from the day it is issued.

Why do you recommend moving immediately?
1. If my information is correct, the US State Department has already advised US citizens to leave Russia

2. Restrictions on future "unnecessary" international and domestic travel due to climate change, but that might not happen for several years

3. Closed borders due to the next wave of the pandemic (possibly prior to the US midterm elections in November).

4. Nuclear "fallout" in the worst case scenario of the "conflict" between Russia and the USA.

Is Argentinian citizenship a good thing to have by the way? As far as I've read, after 1 year of living in Argentina, I could already apply for citizenship? If I have the rentista visa, know Spanish and have spent the full required 2 years in Argentina, I should have no issue getting citizenship, correct?

I my opinion, the answer is YES, especially if you cannot get the temorary residency you desire!

Even if you cannot get the temporary residency you desire, you can come to Argentina and apply for citizenship, but in that case you will need an attorney.

That will cost at least $5000 USD (50% up front as far as I know).
 

steveinbsas

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Is Argentinian citizenship a good thing to have by the way? As far as I've read, after 1 year of living in Argentina, I could already apply for citizenship? If I have the rentista visa, know Spanish and have spent the full required 2 years in Argentina, I should have no issue getting citizenship, correct?

You can apply (with the help of an attorney who knows what he's doing) for Argentine citizenship soon after your arrival.This way. if you overstay your tourist permit, you will be protected from deportation.

According th Bajo_Cero2, the Spanih language requiremnt has been eliminated or at the least is not being enforced now by most (if not all judges),

Either way, you will have sufficient time to learn the language while waiting for your citizenship (unless you always hang out with other expats and only speak English, thereby seriously retarding your ability to learn Spanish).

I lived in Capital Federal for four years, but I did not really begin to learn Spanish until I went full immersion and moved to an area where there are no expats who speak English and very few of the natives do, either.

I can say without any doubt whatsoever that my life in Argentina has become infinitely richer as my ability to speak Spanish has improved.

And I am happy to be surrounded by like minded people who ae prepared to continue living their lives as close to normal as possible WTSHTF.
 
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