So they build this new subway line...

PhilipDT

Registered
and its good. I mean the stations are nice, very open, excellent ventilation. Everything is still clean (for now), the wifi actually works 95% of the time and the escalators are probably leading the pack at 75% functionality.

So here's the multi billion peso question. WHY. IS. THERE. NO. DAMN. A/C.????

:confused:
 

Ries

Registered
I still prefer the Linea A over all others.

I mean, you are gonna be hot and crowded on any subte line, so why not do it in a coach with 100 year old hardwood, real glass light fixtures, bevelled glass mirrors, and wooden seats?

I just rode the Canada Line in Vancouver yesterday- it had AC, and modern plastic seats. It was soulless, clean, and cost 32 pesos for a one way ride. ($7.50 canadian)

You can have it, I will be riding out to the mercado at Primera Junta on Linea A, thank you very much.
 

Ries

Registered
If you are truly uninterested in the soul of a city, what possible reason is there to live in Buenos Aires?

Certainly there are many places more uniform, bland, cheap, and with Air Conditioning...
 

PhilipDT

Registered
Ries said:
I still prefer the Linea A over all others.

I mean, you are gonna be hot and crowded on any subte line, so why not do it in a coach with 100 year old hardwood, real glass light fixtures, bevelled glass mirrors, and wooden seats?
I completely agree and would consider it a travesty if they tossed out the A line cars for new AC'd models.

But my question (or rant) was about building new ones and not putting in A/C
 

scotttswan

Registered
PhilipDT said:
I completely agree and would consider it a travesty if they tossed out the A line cars for new AC'd models.

But my question (or rant) was about building new ones and not putting in A/C
Ries said:
I still prefer the Linea A over all others.

I mean, you are gonna be hot and crowded on any subte line, so why not do it in a coach with 100 year old hardwood, real glass light fixtures, bevelled glass mirrors, and wooden seats?

Neither of you have had to take Linea A during peak hours have you?
 

LAtoBA

Registered
Ries said:
I still prefer the Linea A over all others.

I mean, you are gonna be hot and crowded on any subte line, so why not do it in a coach with 100 year old hardwood, real glass light fixtures, bevelled glass mirrors, and wooden seats?

I just rode the Canada Line in Vancouver yesterday- it had AC, and modern plastic seats. It was soulless, clean, and cost 32 pesos for a one way ride. ($7.50 canadian)

You can have it, I will be riding out to the mercado at Primera Junta on Linea A, thank you very much.
Seriously? Modernizing a subway line, of all things, has nothing to do with "soul" and everything to do with inefficiency. A city can retain its colonial charm and identity and still modernize certain aspects of itself that benefit the greater good. Linea A is a relic from the past. Why not just preserve the rail cars? That's pretty standard practice these days. I am certain that those who have to ride the subte in rush hour, particularly Linea A, would welcome a modernized fleet that better represents Buenos Aires's standing as a world class city. Sitting on gum, pressing up against strangers at the zenith of summer, hot stale air, and a constant lookout for pickpockets gets old fast.

If modernity and comfort means depriving the infrequent rider of nostalgia, so be it.
 

steveinbsas

Registered
elhombresinnombre said:
I don't suppose you'd consider Mozart a 'world class' composer or Pele a 'world class' footballer either, would you?
Mozart and Pele aren't cities. They are mundos of their own...and I really wouldn't compare Pele to Mozart in any serious way.

I've said this before (while I was still living there): Buenos Aires is a pseudo-european shit hole.

I would hardly call it a "world class" city...but who uses that term much today?

It was really a pretentios advertising slogan of the past century.
 
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