Spanish, Catholic, Jesuit Elementary

nledec

Active Member
#1
My husband and I are moving to BA from DC with our kindergartener. We speak Spanish at home, and we would like to put our son in a Spanish-speaking Catholic school (Jesuit, please!). I can't find anything online although I know there has to be several excellent options in the city. Can anyone point me in a good direction?
 
#3
By asking for a Jesuit school you are no doubt asking for a socially liberal Catholic school. That is pretty hard to find in Argentina. Education is very conventional here with mostly rote learning and little student input. Your best option is Cardinal Newman College in San Isidro. The school´s standards are a good deal higher than most and English is widely spoken (the school was established by Irish Christian Brothers). It could be quite hard to get in, however. Boys only.
 

nledec

Active Member
#4
Thank you nikad! Colegio del Salvador was precisely what I was looking for--from the website the school looks just right.
One more question: I'm used to the cut-throat world of private school admissions in DC (testing, interviews, essays--and that was just for kindergarten!). My husband, a native of La Paz, tells me that the admissions process isn't like that at all in South America, though...Is he wrong in the case of Buenos Aires--larger city, more developed, more competition? I'd love to hear any thoughts...
Thanks again!
 

ghost

Registered
#5
"nledec" said:
Thank you nikad! Colegio del Salvador was precisely what I was looking for--from the website the school looks just right.
One more question: I'm used to the cut-throat world of private school admissions in DC (testing, interviews, essays--and that was just for kindergarten!). My husband, a native of La Paz, tells me that the admissions process isn't like that at all in South America, though...Is he wrong in the case of Buenos Aires--larger city, more developed, more competition? I'd love to hear any thoughts...
Thanks again!
If you can pay, you are in.
 

nikad

Registered
#6
"ghost" said:
If you can pay, you are in.
While the admission process for schools can be light in some cases, I can assure you that some schools are strict about it, and it involves tests, interviews, etc. Some religious schools are very picky as well as some non religious ones. Of course if we talk about those "escuelas kiosko" ( as I like to call them ) if you can afford them you are in, but your statement is misleading imhonik
 

nikad

Registered
#7
"nledec" said:
Thank you nikad! Colegio del Salvador was precisely what I was looking for--from the website the school looks just right.

One more question: I'm used to the cut-throat world of private school admissions in DC (testing, interviews, essays--and that was just for kindergarten!). My husband, a native of La Paz, tells me that the admissions process isn't like that at all in South America, though...Is he wrong in the case of Buenos Aires--larger city, more developed, more competition? I'd love to hear any thoughts...

Thanks again!
Glad to be of help =) The admission process can result in a very different experience from school to school, some are very strict, others not much, it might be in general lighter than in the US. It is usually tougher for high school, I have never heard of such process for kindergarten though!
 
#8
Schools consider various factors. Some will take anyone. Others are selective, not so much in terms of academics, but socially. There are schools that maintain a very high social profile and will not take students if they do not like the family´s social background. There are no protections here, as in some countries, so schools can get away with this. I know of one religious school that will not admit the children of divorced parents.
 

nikad

Registered
#9
"austin" said:
Schools consider various factors. Some will take anyone. Others are selective, not so much in terms of academics, but socially. There are schools that maintain a very high social profile and will not take students if they do not like the family´s social background. There are no protections here, as in some countries, so schools can get away with this. I know of one religious school that will not admit the children of divorced parents.
You are right! At some schools the social factor can be exclusive ( been there when I was divorced and yes, it was a catholic school )
 
#10
Hi!

Also keep in mind:

Most catholic schools are crowded b/c they are the cheapest option if you want a private school. I have been looking for Catholic schools in the Belgrano area and it´s not easy! I have found a vacancy for my 4 year old (33 children per class with a teacher and and assistant) but my 6 year old is still to be confirmed (40 children, one teacher). Not very happy about it, but my priority was that they had "horario simple" (turno mañana o turno tarde). Most private schools have mandatory "doble horario" starting at 5 years old, which means kids spend an average of 8 hours in school.

Don´t worry about Catholic schools being old-fashioned or narrow minded. I´ve heard that nowadays their emphasis is more on Christian values and not so much in being perfect Catholics (except for the Opus Dei schools)

Jeez, I am making an efort with my English and now I re-read your msg. and find out you speak Spanish!

The schools I´ve looked at in my area: Manuel Belgrano, San Román, Instituto Santa Ana y San Joaquín, San Maximiliano Kolbe, Esclavas del Sagrado Corazón de Jesús and La Misericordia.

Saludos and good luck!