Sport and politics do not mix

#11
I read a blog from Spain that reviews books called Un Libro al dia. Really good reviews of literature from around the world that has been written or translated into Spanish. One day the review was of Glaxo by Hernan Rosino, an Argentinian writer. The book, which is excellent by the way, because of superb writing and interesting narrative techniques, tells the story of a decaying, dying town out in the Pampas over a number of decades. A comment left by a reader of the blog blasted a contemporary politician here, even though the book has nothing to do with current politics. I realize all good literature helps us makes connections between the past and the present, so I would have understood a comment that said something like, I hope the situation depicted in the book does not repeat itself now, given the situation the country is in. But instead the commenter used the opportunity to make a highly charged, political statement supporting a particular point of view. My response to that was, do we have to bring politics into literally everything? I'd argue there needs to be a few places, a few times when we get off the soap box for at least a few minutes, with international sports competitions being one of them.
 
#14
I read a blog from Spain that reviews books called Un Libro al dia. Really good reviews of literature from around the world that has been written or translated into Spanish. One day the review was of Glaxo by Hernan Rosino, an Argentinian writer. The book, which is excellent by the way, because of superb writing and interesting narrative techniques, tells the story of a decaying, dying town out in the Pampas over a number of decades. A comment left by a reader of the blog blasted a contemporary politician here, even though the book has nothing to do with current politics. I realize all good literature helps us makes connections between the past and the present, so I would have understood a comment that said something like, I hope the situation depicted in the book does not repeat itself now, given the situation the country is in. But instead the commenter used the opportunity to make a highly charged, political statement supporting a particular point of view. My response to that was, do we have to bring politics into literally everything? I'd argue there needs to be a few places, a few times when we get off the soap box for at least a few minutes, with international sports competitions being one of them.
To say that sports professionals who are expected to be role models, and who have a massive public platform and responsibilities are the same as a random spammer on a book review somewhere seems a little unfair, though I understand the sentiment.
 
#16
Actually as either public, or semi public, figures; sports people have a moral duty to leverage their relatively high levels of public exposure to benefit the population.

Most sports events have a 'national anthem' sung, which is an inherently political nationalistic act. So let's not pretend that politics isn't part of organized sports events from the start. Not seeing this only serves to protect the status quo of the political establishment (along with the 'circus' part of the same old and tired 'bread and circus' methodology)

Oh, and also let's not forget:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sporting_boycott_of_South_Africa_during_the_apartheid_era


Cheers!
Political protest should be allowed by any ideological grouping who doesn't incite hatread and violence. The ultra right often do just this, as do the ultra left. But for the most part it should be fine.
I completely disagree sports are not political events ever. You seem to be condoning free speech that many people are not in agreement with. Many countries in the world are anti american. Anti muslim. Anti this and anti that by your argument these people can express their political right to free speech. Imagine if the iranian olympic team had banners on their arms in farsi saying I hate the united kingdom by your arguments this is acceptable?
 
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#17
I read a blog from Spain that reviews books called Un Libro al dia. Really good reviews of literature from around the world that has been written or translated into Spanish. One day the review was of Glaxo by Hernan Rosino, an Argentinian writer. The book, which is excellent by the way, because of superb writing and interesting narrative techniques, tells the story of a decaying, dying town out in the Pampas over a number of decades. A comment left by a reader of the blog blasted a contemporary politician here, even though the book has nothing to do with current politics. I realize all good literature helps us makes connections between the past and the present, so I would have understood a comment that said something like, I hope the situation depicted in the book does not repeat itself now, given the situation the country is in. But instead the commenter used the opportunity to make a highly charged, political statement supporting a particular point of view. My response to that was, do we have to bring politics into literally everything? I'd argue there needs to be a few places, a few times when we get off the soap box for at least a few minutes, with international sports competitions being one of them.
Stantucker I am in full agreement with you
 
#18
To say that sports professionals who are expected to be role models, and who have a massive public platform and responsibilities are the same as a random spammer on a book review somewhere seems a little unfair, though I understand the sentiment.
What's funny is that sport stars and celebrities who were very anti-Trump were part of the reason he won. Their patronization did/does not play with middle American. They wonder who these people think they are to tell me how to vote. That kind of thing can be seen only as patronizing because it's completely out of place and not asked for. Another reason to keep politics out of sports, out of most things, including literary blogs.
 
#19
What's funny is that sport stars and celebrities who were very anti-Trump were part of the reason he won. Their patronization did/does not play with middle American. They wonder who these people think they are to tell me how to vote. That kind of thing can be seen only as patronizing because it's completely out of place and not asked for. Another reason to keep politics out of sports, out of most things, including literary blogs.
And let me add that kind of thing is patronizing whether it's coming from the left, right or center.
 
#20
I completely disagree sports are not political events ever. You seem to be condoning free speech that many people are not in agreement with. Many countries in the world are anti american. Anti muslim. Anti this and anti that by your argument these people can express their political right to free speech. Imagine if the iranian olympic team had banners on their arms in farsi saying I hate the united kingdom by your arguments this is acceptable?
As I said, people should be allowed to express their political views. The exception to this is where they incite violence. You can also of course, as someone else mentioned earlier, contractually forbid certain speach in an employment environment.

I'm just stating what the law is in most modern democracies, and with good reason. Certain fachista or communist regimes do of course have a much harsher standard and enforcement of speach; along the lines you are advocating for.

Cheers!