The Aenoikenk

#1

Its very sad that most Argentinian people know so little about their history and the proud and dignified race the Aonikenk who lived in perfect harmony with nature . They were a very healthy race and the invaders from Europe called them giants and that is how Patagonia derived its name from greek meaning big foot. They were the tallest indigenous race of the time and were 100% hunters eating wild animals their favourite being Guanaco . Men and women lived in perfect harmony and the mother had a very important role in the society . The original settlers massacred them brutally including the Welsh in their conquest of Chubut .

Few descendants live on today in the provinces mostly in Santa Cruz , Chubut , Rio Negro , and Tierra del Fuego .

Please listen the the video and its message from the great singer Ruben a descendant of this proud race .

Ojeando un libro que se llama “La Patagonia Trágica” de José María Borrero y en una de sus páginas dice textualmente:

“Y por cada oreja de Tehuelche, pagaban un patacón. Los Tehuelches nunca fueron hombre de lanza y sin embargo quedan muy pocos ya.
Es por eso que elevamos desde aquí un ruego para aquellos verdaderos dueños de esas tierras los Tehuelches, Los Aonikenk, los hombres del sur como quiere decir esa palabra Aonikenk, Aonikenk, Aonikenk!!!!!!
Aonikenk, Aonikenk, Aonikenk
En cada margen del río Santa Cruz
Esta llorando el silencio en el azul
Por donde ayer
Paso dibujó
la cruz al viento, guanaco cazador
Boleando al tiempo, guanaco cazador
Boleando al tiempo.
Aonikenk, Aonikenk, Aonikenk
Todo era tuyo, el mar el río el lago el cielo
El resplandor del sol fugaz sobre la nieve
Eras el rey errante soñador de los desiertos
Plumaje de ñandú boleando al tiempo
Plumaje de ñandú boleando al tiempo
Pero llegaron otros hombres
Con un regalo y otras voz
Para ganarse tu confianza te sumergieron en alcohol
Después te llamaba borracho el mismo ser que te enseñó
Al mismo tiempo que ofrecía por tus orejas un patacón
Por tus orejas un patacón…
Para qué, para qué se pregunta el viento de ayer
Aquel que besó la frente
Del que cayera inocente muerto por el cañadón
Para que la pura sangre derramada en la ambicion
Por una tierra que aun sigue siendo un desierto hoy
Hay tierra mía, hay tierra mía
Para que te despoblaron si no te saben poblar
Para que tantas orejas si no saben escuchar!!!
Aonikenk, Aonikenk, Aonikenk

The english translation to this song

"And for each ear of Tehuelche, they paid a patacón. The Tehuelches were never a spearman and yet there are very few left. That is why we raise from here a plea for those true owners of those lands the Tehuelches, the Aonikenk, the southern men as that word means Aonikenk, Aonikenk, Aonikenk !!! Aonikenk, Aonikenk, Aonikenk On each side of the Santa Cruz River Is crying the silence in the blue Where yesterday Paso drew the cross to the wind, guanaco hunter Boleando to the time, guanaco hunter Boleando to the time. Aonikenk, Aonikenk, Aonikenk Everything was yours, the sea the river the lake the sky The shining of the fleeting sun on the snow You were the errant king dreaming of the deserts Plumage of ñandú boleando to the time Plumage of rhea boleando to the time But arrived other men with a gift and other voices To gain your trust, you were immersed in alcohol. Afterwards, the same being who taught you called you drunk. At the same time he offered a patacón for your ears. For your ears, a patacón ... Why, why does the wind of yesterday ask? The one who kissed the forehead Of the innocent who fell dead by the canyon So that the pure blood spilled in ambition For a land that still remains a desert today There is my land, there is my land To be depopulated if you do not know how to populate For so many ears if they do not know how to listen! Aonikenk, Aonikenk, Aonikenk
 
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#2
Thanks for taking the time to post this interesting information. It would be nice if you and others want to discuss the history of Argentina so those of us that are interested can learn more. I enjoy learning about the lives of the people that the streets are named after. Being a tango dancer, I like to visit places mentioned in the songs.

Here are the lyrics to a milonga that talks about a wedding party in what I'm assuming is the park in front of where the Congreso building is today. I've read that Buenos Aires had a large population of Afro-Argentines in the early 1800s https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Afro-Argentines and that Juan Manuel de Rosas (El Restaurador) was somewhat sympathetic to them. It has been written that sometimes he attended their celebrations.
La mulateada

Están de fiesta
en la calle Larga
los mazorqueros
de Monserrat.
Y entre las luces
de las antorchas,
bailan los negros
de La Piedad.
Se casa Pancho,
rey del candombe,
con la mulata
más federal,
que en los cuarteles
de la Recova,
soñó el mulato
sentimental.


Baila, mulata linda,
bajo la luna llena,
que al chi, qui, chi del chinesco,
canta el negro del tambor.
Baila, mulata linda,
de la divisa roja,
que están mirando los ojos
de nuestro Restaurador.


Ya esta servida
la mazamorra
y el chocolate
tradicional
y el favorito
plato de locro,
quer ha preparado
un buen federal.
Y al son alegre
de tamboriles
los novios van
a la Concepción
y al paso brinda,
la mulateada,
por la más Santa
Federación.
 

Tilda

Registered
#4
Hmm... how can I be politically correct about this?
It is very easy to romanticize a past that isn’t evident anymore. A society that didn’t have writing only has oral traditions to base its history on. And by definition that history has either been subtly changed in every retelling or coloured by the narrator’s culture.

Having said that, the Tehuelches were displaced by the Mapuches, granted with the help of the European guns and horses.

Actually I was trying to continue my line of thought but, to be honest, my opinion is too coloured by what is happening here in Patagonia at the moment to be fair and balanced. So I’ll leave it there before I go down an alley that I don’t like...
 
#5
The aeonikenk are
Hmm... how can I be politically correct about this?
It is very easy to romanticize a past that isn’t evident anymore. A society that didn’t have writing only has oral traditions to base its history on. And by definition that history has either been subtly changed in every retelling or coloured by the narrator’s culture.

Having said that, the Tehuelches were displaced by the Mapuches, granted with the help of the European guns and horses.

Actually I was trying to continue my line of thought but, to be honest, my opinion is too coloured by what is happening here in Patagonia at the moment to be fair and balanced. So I’ll leave it there before I go down an alley that I don’t like...

Tilda I also am very saddened that Patagonia is being used by outside interests to divide and conquer . The Mapuches imho have no historic claim on the Argentinian side of Patagonia but are agitating and creating disturbances in a very peaceful corner of the world . The Tehuelches have been living in the argentinian side of Patagonia for over 5000 years , the mapuches came just recently . Patagonia is of incredible importance as it really is the Last frontier of the planet.
 

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