The Hidden History of Black Argentina

artisans

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This subject got a well informed workout in another thread that's still here on BA Expat "Rasism in Argentina"
 

Pierre Smith

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Yeah, I seem to recall that the conclusion was that - whatever anyone else from different countries thinks about it - the very small black population was generally folded into the genetic tapestry of lower class Argentines, and pretty much nobody wants to admit or remember any part of it. So, in many ways, this America-derived racial sensitivity is a solution looking for a problem - that is, however "problematic" people might find Argentina's history on the blacks, including even some Argentines, it's just not really something that 95% of Argentines, including and especially those with African blood, really want to talk at all about. At least, that's what I seem to recall as being the conclusion to the last discussion on this topic.
 

Pierre Smith

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El equipo de investigadores también detalló que en el genoma argentino “promedio” convive ADN originario de tres regiones diferentes de África: dos ya fueron ampliamente descriptas en nuestro territorio y vienen del centro-oeste y del centro de África, que son los más “representados”. Pero ahora los investigadores encontraron una novedad: “También hay rasgos de ADN de grupos originarios de África del este, y –en ciertos individuos– hasta el 30% de su ancestría podría haber llegado de países cercanos a Mozambique, que fue un punto principal de embarque de esclavizados”, contó Luisi.
Oof, no creo que hay una pronunciación de una manera u otra en lo que concierne la desaparición de los africanos argentinos.
 

Renzi

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Latin America and the Caribbean as a whole have always had an ambiguous relationship with their African roots, and ironically, this has always been most pronounced in regions that have a higher Afro-descendant population. For instance, Dominican Republic dictator Rafael Trujillo (himself partly of African origin, though he was said to wear makeup to hide any evidence) implemented one of the harshest regimes of anti-Black racial discrimination ever seen in the Americas. He even actively tried to encourage European immigration to his country to alter its racial composition.
 

Cosme

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Buenos Aires was a very small town at the beginning of the XIX century. By 1812 the city was inhabited by only 40.000 people from which ⅓ (12,000) were slaves. Slaves were freed by a decree from an interim government in 1813 (by then, the country was still a Spanish colony, as independence was declared in 1816). Some joined the army and died during the emancipation military campaigns, others emigrated and the vast majority got blended into the local population.
 
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