The Macri Debate

#1
Once again (surprise surprise) another political figure inspiring total admiration if not love by some (mostly upper class/professionals?) and total loathing (IE: bombarding Facebook with memes every 2 minutes type of thing)... what is the deal?

What I mean is that (at least in my circle of friends) many of these same people who claim to hate Macri and are now fondly reminscent of CFK, I distinctly recall also disliking her when she was in office (though not as much as they loathe Macri now) a few examples-
Our housekeeper who we’ve had for more than a decade obviously has become more than just a woman who does work for us but really more of a family friend so we have open conversations. Back in the CFK years, she had a real estate debt that she needed to pay in USD and was hysterical when the cepo cambiaro came round and thought she was going to have to lose her home and cag—— en la madre que la pario’ of CFK. She is also rather religious and against abortion. Now, with Macri, she hates hates hates him and talks of Cristina as if she were her best friend (we don’t want to be the smart asses and remind her of her CFK rants back in the day) Another Guy who’s a buddy of mine who works as a mazo in a fine dining place who back in the day said he’d never forgive Cristina for impairing him from getting USD to take his family on vacation, who now takes vacations nicer than me but claims to be always broke, and says ‘life is hell’ with Macri and that 28.000 pesos is not enough (while this salary in USD for a waiter in fine dining is low, in some European countries like Spain or Portugal some waiters do make this amount comprable) and that argentina is on its way to outright poverty.
On the opposite end of the spectrum, we have professional and upper class friends who during the Macri years life hasn’t gone all that swimmingly: IE- a marketing executive losing her job, another one who’s job got shipped abroad, and a doctor who is mono tributo who is now having to work long hours so he can go away the occasional weekend to his hometown, etc—- yet these are IN LOVE with Macri.

It’s a bit confusing and I guess it depends on who you ask and their particular personal situation. The president of the IMF was here and sang Macri’s praises for putting Argentina back on the global industrial map.

What’s everyone’s thoughts/experiences been with this? Does the fact that we now have a ‘trendy’ and ‘non politician’ ‘business man’ at the wheel change your perception about Argentina and it’s future and how you want to live your life in it?
 
#2
The issues with this country are bigger than politics. It is cultural.. Politicians will come and go, promises will never be adhered to, corruption will continue - at the end of the day you take the lesser of two evils. Coming to Argentina with an open mind I lean towards Macri because he is at least trying to change things for the better. Cristina was a dishonest propoganda filled crazy who had expert theives all around her yet shouted as loud as she could that she represents the poor. She used classic distraction tactics and always looked elsewhere to lay blame (America being the evil one). She was a rat. The country has had way too long with her and her deceased husband in power and has not made any sort of development to be proud of. Time to give someone else a go - she stole enough already.
 
#3
Cristina was a demagogue and a myopic, hysterical one at that. A friend who worked at a senior level in the national bank once told me she never wanted to even listen to the probable negative consequences of her intended actions. Her fiscal policy never got more sophisticated/constructive than "milenesas para todos." Poverty with the concomitant lack of critical imports was exacerbated during her administration.
 
#4
@Daniel82,

We aren't rational creatures. We remember things more fondly in the past, we like to attribute problems to other people or outside forces when possible, our political opinions are a combination of genetics, personal experiences, background and limited information.

Trump summed it up perfectly when in a moment of a candor he said "I could shoot someone on 5th Avenue and still would not loose any supporters." This applies to most people. Cristina could've done anything and her hardcore supporters would somehow justify it, same with Macri.

I think you'll learn more by reading up on cognitive biases - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_cognitive_biases . We're just a bunch of story telling monkeys who are easily fooled by others and ourselves.
 
#5
We aren't rational creatures. We remember things more fondly in the past, we like to attribute problems to other people or outside forces when possible, our political opinions are a combination of genetics, personal experiences, background and limited information.

Trump summed it up perfectly when in a moment of a candor he said "I could shoot someone on 5th Avenue and still would not loose any supporters." This applies to most people. Cristina could've done anything and her hardcore supporters would somehow justify it, same with Macri.

I think you'll learn more by reading up on cognitive biases - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_cognitive_biases . We're just a bunch of story telling monkeys who are easily fooled by others and ourselves.
This 100%. Most people do not want to take responsibility for their lack of success. It's much easier to blame someone else (politicians, capitalism, the USA, your family, etc.) for your misfortunes than to accept responsibility yourself. We all do this to some degree. No one wants to feel like a loser.

(Of course, there are exceptions. I imagine it's hard to thrive in Syria right now, no matter how motivated you are.)

Politicians are experts at letting people off the hook to gain votes. Telling people what they want to hear is powerful. Both Macri and Cristina do this, although I'd argue Cristina is better at it AND has many more scapegoats in her arsenal.

I just don't see how this country will ever change. A corrupt political system is a product of a corrupt culture. It doesn't matter who is sitting in the Casa Rosada. The politicians will continue to laugh all the way to the bank while the general population squabbles between themselves as to which politician's thievery is worse.
 
#6
I just don't see how this country will ever change. A corrupt political system is a product of a corrupt culture. It doesn't matter who is sitting in the Casa Rosada. The politicians will continue to laugh all the way to the bank while the general population squabbles between themselves as to which politician's thievery is worse.
The people get the politicians they deserve.
 
#8
I just don't see how this country will ever change. A corrupt political system is a product of a corrupt culture. It doesn't matter who is sitting in the Casa Rosada. The politicians will continue to laugh all the way to the bank while the general population squabbles between themselves as to which politician's thievery is worse.
Unfortunately, too many Argentines appear to share this apathetic, defeatist attitude. That, in and of itself, is a big problem. Too many Argentines seem to believe it is impossible to effect change so they have an almost indifferent attitude about the corruption they see around them. The country will change when the citizens are energized by a dynamic leader...or, at least, an effective one who can increase productivity and parlay the country's natural assets into greater wealth and well being. It is yet to be seen whether Macri fits the bill.
 
#9
Unfortunately, too many Argentines appear to share this apathetic, defeatist attitude. That, in and of itself, is a big problem. Too many Argentines seem to believe it is impossible to effect change so they have an almost indifferent attitude about the corruption they see around them. The country will change when the citizens are energized by a dynamic leader...or, at least, an effective one who can increase productivity and parlay the country's natural assets into greater wealth and well being. It is yet to be seen whether Macri fits the bill.
Tend to agree with that.
At the end of the day it's up to the people to change and from what I see on a daily basis that's not going to happen any time soon.
 
#10
I do see some hope in the younger generation. They not as disacciated with reality as the older ones here. IMHO either that or I work some special breed of Argentinians.