The Secrets to Thriving in Argentina.....

Mira Vos!

Registered
Thought it would be interesting if people that live in Argentina and/or have traveled there shared some of their steps on how to thrive once arriving. Things that people likely wouldn't know unless they did a little bit of research about the country.

Can be anything....ways to save money, how to live better, general tips etc.

Couple examples

- Using the blue dolar or Western Union rate can get you close to doubling your money in Argentina
- The importance of making US Dollars or Euros if you are staying in the country long term
- Can save a decent amount of money walking or using public transportation compared to taxis
- How to save money eating food (whether that means eating local or in certain neighborhoods more than others)

What are your secrets to thriving in Argentina?
 

EL_TIGRE_de_Tigre

Registered
Thought it would be interesting if people that live in Argentina and/or have traveled there shared some of their steps on how to thrive once arriving. Things that people likely wouldn't know unless they did a little bit of research about the country.

Can be anything....ways to save money, how to live better, general tips etc.

Couple examples

- Using the blue dolar or Western Union rate can get you close to doubling your money in Argentina
- The importance of making US Dollars or Euros if you are staying in the country long term
- Can save a decent amount of money walking or using public transportation compared to taxis
- How to save money eating food (whether that means eating local or in certain neighborhoods more than others)

What are your secrets to thriving in Argentina?
MV,

There are many things, but I am going to offer the very best one from my point of view. SO PAY HEED TO IT:

It all boils down to one simple word >>> COMMUNICATION!

Familiarize yourself with the local dialect. So many people think, "I know Spanish, I got this." And the truth is they don't have it. When they arrive for the first time, they quickly understand Argentines are speaking a different version of the language. A lot of slang, a lot of different words for the same thing you already know and an accent that will confuse you at first, not to mention heavy use of the voseo vs tuteo.

Study, learn, study, learn and study some more. Truth is, it is a life long process to acquire a second language if it isn't done when you are a child. So don't beat yourself up for not being fluent after working your butt off for 3 to 5 years. But, you should be awful good in that time frame as well, just not perfect. SO\o if you are going to be great, it has to be a passion, something you really enjoy. Otherwise you won't put the hours and work into the learning that is needed to succeed.

As my grandfather, who spoke seven languages fluently (WOW!) used to say: "You really can't enjoy yourself in another country as well as you could, if you don't know the language."

LEARN THE LANGUAGE. My best advice.

Good luck.
 

Mira Vos!

Registered
MV,

There are many things, but I am going to offer the very best one from my point of view. SO PAY HEED TO IT:

It all boils down to one simple word >>> COMMUNICATION!

Familiarize yourself with the local dialect. So many people think, "I know Spanish, I got this." And the truth is they don't have it. When they arrive for the first time, they quickly understand Argentines are speaking a different version of the language. A lot of slang, a lot of different words for the same thing you already know and an accent that will confuse you at first, not to mention heavy use of the voseo vs tuteo.

Study, learn, study, learn and study some more. Truth is, it is a life long process to acquire a second language if it isn't done when you are a child. So don't beat yourself up for not being fluent after working your butt off for 3 to 5 years. But, you should be awful good in that time frame as well, just not perfect. SO\o if you are going to be great, it has to be a passion, something you really enjoy. Otherwise you won't put the hours and work into the learning that is needed to succeed.

As my grandfather, who spoke seven languages fluently (WOW!) used to say: "You really can't enjoy yourself in another country as well as you could, if you don't know the language."

LEARN THE LANGUAGE. My best advice.

Good luck.
Appreciate the advice Tigre, definitely makes sense. Have definitely found myself the last month really focusing on people speaking Argentine Spanish (Dustin Luke, shows like TyC Sports, Argentinian TV on YouTube). My Spanish is maybe 6/10, but do you think the locals in BA appreciate foreigners trying to speak more local (slang words like tranqui, re copado etc) compared to "Gringo Spanish"?
 

Pierre Smith

Registered
In addition to the above, I'd say:

(1) Walk everywhere - there's no better way to learn the place;
(2) Have something to do every day - a class, a lunch date, some sort of work, you need a purpose, otherwise you'll never put down roots;
(3) Travel the country - Argentina's smaller cities/towns and regions are great, and the more you get around, the more you'll have a sense of the place. Plus, they're generally cheaper!;
(4) Cultivate a local bar/cafe - there's a rich reward to having a default place, as you'll make friends and become part of a little scene; and
(5) Always buy local and artisanal - your experience of and contribution to Argentina is much richer when you're cultivating/sustaining the foods/drinks/products/experiences that are unique to the place.
 

Mira Vos!

Registered
In addition to the above, I'd say:

(1) Walk everywhere - there's no better way to learn the place;
(2) Have something to do every day - a class, a lunch date, some sort of work, you need a purpose, otherwise you'll never put down roots;
(3) Travel the country - Argentina's smaller cities/towns and regions are great, and the more you get around, the more you'll have a sense of the place. Plus, they're generally cheaper!;
(4) Cultivate a local bar/cafe - there's a rich reward to having a default place, as you'll make friends and become part of a little scene; and
(5) Always buy local and artisanal - your experience of and contribution to Argentina is much richer when you're cultivating/sustaining the foods/drinks/products/experiences that are unique to the place.
Thanks for the tips! Favorite city outside BA to say in? Definitely want to check out the south of Argentina and also Mendoza. In terms of a longer term stay though (a month or so) Cordoba looks like a really cool spot.
 

Ceviche

Registered
Its very easy to higher high quality teachers here at local salaries. I have 5-6 teachers teaching me different things for last many years. And it has paid off. I have developed lot of new skills which I never thought I was capable of in my past life in other countries.

Its also a good way to know local people via the communication with your teachers, and form great friendships with them.

In short - Invest in locals teachers for learning new skills. Its very doable here and won't create a hole in your pocket. And the newly acquired skills will catapult you in enjoying the life even more, here.
 

Mira Vos!

Registered
Its very easy to higher high quality teachers here at local salaries. I have 5-6 teachers teaching me different things for last many years. And it has paid off. I have developed lot of new skills which I never thought I was capable of in my past life in other countries.

Its also a good way to know local people via the communication with your teachers, and form great friendships with them.

In short - Invest in locals teachers for learning new skills. Its very doable here and won't create a hole in your pocket. And the newly acquired skills will catapult you in enjoying the life even more, here.
Some examples? I've heard Spanish teachers and fitness trainers are very good examples of this
 

Ceviche

Registered
Some examples? I've heard Spanish teachers and fitness trainers are very good examples of this
Find out what you are passionate about. When the student is ready, the teacher will appear!

--

Regarding fitness coaches, lot of expats do this stupidity of hiring other English speaking expats and pay them- even on present day in CABA - like 40 or 50 usd/ hour in BA. Utter nonsense. A high quality fitness trainer who speaks ONLY Spanish can be obtained for 800 pesos or 1000 pesos per hour on present day. He will teach you exactly the same thing which that "posh" English speaking coach will.
 
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sts7049

Registered
one of the best tips i can give is, don't expect to have everything exactly as you had it in the US. if you come here with that expectation, it will either stress you out or eventually force you to change your ways or expectations.

once you start to accept that, life becomes a little easier. but you will still be faced with the rest of the general BS and chaos of argentina
 

Mira Vos!

Registered
Find out what you are passionate about. When the student is ready, the teacher will appear!

--

Regarding fitness coaches, lot of expats do this stupidity of hiring other English speaking expats and pay them- even on present day in CABA - like 40 or 50 usd/ hour in BA. Utter nonsense. A high quality fitness trainer who speaks ONLY Spanish can be obtained for 800 pesos or 1000 pesos per hour on present day. He will teach you exactly the same thing which that "posh" English speaking coach will.
Would definitely look local for something like that! Same if I was looking for a Boxing or Muay Thai instructor. How common is Tango with locals that are 18-35 years old? That's another thing I'd be possibly interesting in, whether it's going to free classes or actually getting a teacher.
 
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