Tourist Visas Sketchy...is Marrying An Argentine The Answer?

tesstafarian

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With all the news (and gossip) about expats running into issues with tourist visas and re-entering Argentina (whether they have adhered to the 3 month exit or have overstayed and paid the fees), it's pretty apparent that relying on tourist visas may not be the best solution anymore. I'm a US Citizen, I don't work, study or own property in Argentina, nor do I have any children. I reached out to an Argentina lawyer this week and he jokingly (albeit very seriously) suggested I get married to an Argentine (or other individual with Argentine Citizenship/Permanent Residency).

There are threads about what you have to do to get married, and what steps you then have to take to obtain your Permanent Residency, but I'm interested in learning what marriage in Argentina really MEANS regarding taxes, legality issues, etc.

If I marry a friend:
  1. Will he have a right to everything I earn and own? Are there prenuptial agreements in BA?
  2. Does getting married (and obtaining Permanent Residency) mean that I have to have an income in Argentina and pay taxes on that income? If I didn't officially earn an income in Argentina, would we still have to file Argentine taxes together?
  3. Does the government go to any lengths to prove the validity of your marriage (drop by the home to determine if you're living together, etc.)?
  4. What else am I missing?

I don't know how long I wish to stay in BA, but I know I want the option to keep my life here. The lawyer also suggested going the "rentista" visa route...but I'm not sure how I can set something up in the US to qualify for this either.

Any thoughts, suggestions, personal experiences, etc. would be greatly appreciated. (I'm also accepting marriage proposals...)
 

Girino

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1. I was told no, if you get a divorce you are under no obligation to provide for your spouse. If you have children, you should provide for them, though. But I still believe you might be under obligation to provide for him/her during the marriage (i.e. if he is unemployed and pretends to live in your house, you can't kick him out...). Nice news: he can be a she, so this double your choices! About prenuptials, I don't think. The law is prevailing upon private arrangements.
2. No, you can be a resident housewife.
3. This is not the US. They don't care. Of course, don't go there telling them "we're just getting married so I can get permanent residency", fake marriages are illegal, but they don't stick their nose in your business.
4. I suppose you live on savings/pension/trust - you could apply for the correspondent VISA, instead.
 

RSPlayer

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With all the news (and gossip) about expats running into issues with tourist visas and re-entering Argentina (whether they have adhered to the 3 month exit or have overstayed and paid the fees), it's pretty apparent that relying on tourist visas may not be the best solution anymore. I'm a US Citizen, I don't work, study or own property in Argentina, nor do I have any children. I reached out to an Argentina lawyer this week and he jokingly (albeit very seriously) suggested I get married to an Argentine (or other individual with Argentine Citizenship/Permanent Residency).

There are threads about what you have to do to get married, and what steps you then have to take to obtain your Permanent Residency, but I'm interested in learning what marriage in Argentina really MEANS regarding taxes, legality issues, etc.

If I marry a friend:
  1. Will he have a right to everything I earn and own? Are there prenuptial agreements in BA?
  2. Does getting married (and obtaining Permanent Residency) mean that I have to have an income in Argentina and pay taxes on that income? If I didn't officially earn an income in Argentina, would we still have to file Argentine taxes together?
  3. Does the government go to any lengths to prove the validity of your marriage (drop by the home to determine if you're living together, etc.)?
  4. What else am I missing?
I don't know how long I wish to stay in BA, but I know I want the option to keep my life here. The lawyer also suggested going the "rentista" visa route...but I'm not sure how I can set something up in the US to qualify for this either.

Any thoughts, suggestions, personal experiences, etc. would be greatly appreciated. (I'm also accepting marriage proposals...)


Ojo. There are other consequences to marrying an Argentine.
 

French jurist

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Not sure I'll keep the avatar pic asking that but that's me.

I don't know your situation of course but real friends, I have two or three (mainly from childhood): I could ask them anything and they could too.
Let's imagine you marry with a friend and the relationship deteriorates in two years while you're dating another person: you would be a very easy target for blackmail.

Taxation: based on your residency but others will explain better.

Why not get a student visa since you look young? Looks easier & safer
 

Crema Americana

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Anything of value that you acquire, will be acquired jointly. I know this because when my husband bought his car, since he's married, they wanted my DNI. At the time I didn't have one, and in the end they had to put he was single (I didn't want to be on the title anyway.) So, yes, anything acquired gets split. As far as I know, prenups aren't as commonplace nor ironclad. Any children will most likely be able to claim inheritance.

I wouldn't get involved in a sham marriage, but that's just me. It's just as illegal (or worse) as overstaying a visa.

If you've lived here for 2 years maybe you could acquire citizenship if you see your future in Argentina.
 

PhilipDT

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I have several friends from Cuba who married argentines in order to get visas. I would think you would have easier options available to you.
 

BaltRochGirl

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I would find a different lawyer and explore the other options with them. Unless you're already in a serious relationship contemplating marriage is not something to be taken into lightly. Getting a divorce is not the easiest process here and prenuptial agreements are not enforced.
 
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