Turkey

EdRooney

Registered
Its funny I was reading Erdogan go on about how the protesters are working against the minority of Turks, and it sounded for a moment like he was channelling Ms K... but then again the economic models are completely opposite. AKP has put Turkey through the type of neo-liberalism that the K's allege to fight against. Socially theyre opposites too, as the K's are pro-marriage equality whilst AKP is borderline Muslim traditionalist.

A closer recent example for the economic/political model might be Iran, as you will most likely see the elections here swing to the right as they did this week in Iran, but that comparison can be problematic too.
 

sleslie23

Registered
Actually, Turkey and Argentina couldn't be more different. What is going on in Turkey now is more of a culture war. Those who are protesting do not like the increasing conservatism of Erdogan's government, among other things.

Turkey has had steady economic growth and stability and an increasing roll in regional politics. If anything the comparison would be with Brazil.

Ed "Your Bartender Issac Washington" Rooney, the elections in Iran did not swing to the right. Rohani is considered a "moderate reformist." Or as Forbes calls him, "the least bad candidate."

http://www.forbes.co...ntial-election/
 

scotttswan

Registered
https://twitter.com/...anadam&src=hash

"Standing Man" timeline

At around 8pm in Istanbul, one man stood in Taksim Square...and continued to stand. Within hours, #duranadam, or #standingman, was trending worldwide on Twitter. Police broke up the protest at 2am. Watch the progression..

http://storify.com/gkates/standing-man-timeline?utm_source=t.co&awesm=sfy.co_s95t&utm_medium=sfy.co-twitter&utm_campaign=&utm_content=storify-pingback
 

ajoknoblauch

Registered
Actually, Turkey and Argentina couldn't be more different. What is going on in Turkey now is more of a culture war. Those who are protesting do not like the increasing conservatism of Erdogan's government, among other things.

Turkey has had steady economic growth and stability and an increasing roll in regional politics. If anything the comparison would be with Brazil.

Ed "Your Bartender Issac Washington" Rooney, the elections in Iran did not swing to the right. Rohani is considered a "moderate reformist." Or as Forbes calls him, "the least bad candidate."

http://www.forbes.co...ntial-election/
Nor do a lot of Argentines like the conservatism of Cristina's government.
 

EdRooney

Registered
Ed "Your Bartender Issac Washington" Rooney, the elections in Iran did not swing to the right. Rohani is considered a "moderate reformist." Or as Forbes calls him, "the least bad candidate."
So if I understand you, your proof that Rohani is not a swing to the right is the fact that the right wing business press (in this case Forbes) is moderately happy with the election?

And Knobloch: you're going to have to give more details on how the big attack against this gov't is from the left. Since Pino Solanas joined the right wing last week, the only pols to the left of oficialismo are Jorge Altamira and the Partido Obrero, who will unfortunately be lucky to get 3% in the next 2 elections.
 

sleslie23

Registered
So if I understand you, your proof that Rohani is not a swing to the right is the fact that the right wing business press (in this case Forbes) is moderately happy with the election?

And Knobloch: you're going to have to give more details on how the big attack against this gov't is from the left. Since Pino Solanas joined the right wing last week, the only pols to the left of oficialismo are Jorge Altamira and the Partido Obrero, who will unfortunately be lucky to get 3% in the next 2 elections.
My "proof" is that I actually bothered to read up on the Iranian elections. Here's another link for you from the Guardian:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jun/15/iran-presidential-election-hassan-rouhani-wins

Or is that too liberal?

On what information do you base your statement that Iran's election is a "swing to the right?"
 

EdRooney

Registered
My "proof" is that I actually bothered to read up on the Iranian elections. Here's another link for you from the Guardian:

http://www.guardian....an-rouhani-wins

Or is that too liberal?

On what information do you base your statement that Iran's election is a "swing to the right?"
That is a much better source, but even the Guardian's and other news sources' tingeing of Rouhani's election as a leftward turn is a basic misunderstanding of Iranian politics. Rouhani is best known as a close ally of ex-president Rafsanjani, a multi-millionaire who is the perennial favourite candidate of London and DC due to his 'pro-business' leanings. As top Iran scholars such as Hillary Leverett, Ali Banuazizi, et al, have noted, this is the main complaint the US and Europe have had about Ahmedinejad and the "hard-line" Iranian revolutionaries in general: they do not open Iran up for business. This is the same complaint they have with all "left populist" governments: Venezuela, Cuba, Zimbabwe... Argentina. Rouhani looks to be a marked shift away from Ahmedinejad's populism which was more based in lower income levels, whereas Rouhani's main base is the upper-middle class.

It is always the case that instant-pundits come out in the newspapers with erroneous generalisations, but if you go to the people who really study Iran on a scholarly level (can't recommend the Leveretts enough), you will come away with a clearer picture.
 

mjohnstone

Registered
Misled by the post's title ... thought I'd find out where to buy a turkey for dinner. Always thought July or August are better months than Nov/Dec to replicate Thanksgiving and/or Xmas dinner.
 
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