Validate Marriage Abroad In Argentina

ElCordobés

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Anyone validate a marriage abroad with the registro in Argentina? I believe the term is "validar matrimonio en el extranjero." It appears that it's a judicial process (federal/provincial?) then a trip to the registro.

Is it required? Is there any reason that it would be advisable to do so? Such as estate issues, children, etc? If anyone has done it--how was your process?

Italy requires registration of all acts of marriage, birth, divorce and death for its citizens abroad. But I'm not finding anything comparable as explicitly clear for Argentina. Uruguay registers foreign births, marriage as well.

Thanks!
 

ben

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Italy requires registration of all acts of marriage, birth, divorce and death for its citizens abroad. But I'm not finding anything comparable as explicitly clear for Argentina. Uruguay registers foreign births, marriage as well.

Just to be clear, an Italian living in the US is legally required to register his US marriage with the Italian govt?
 

wineguy999

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You've pointed out the good reasons to do it - and it is necessary for a number of things.

My wife and I decided that it's probably easier (and much cheaper) to get married again in Argentina than to deal with the amount of red tape involved.

The conversation in the registro was funny:
"You have to go to a lawyer, who presents to a judge, then the judge decides if your marriage can be recognized in Argentina."
"Sounds easier to just get married here."
"But you can't, you're already married."
"But you just told us that we're not."
"Asi que........................"
 

ajoknoblauch

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You've pointed out the good reasons to do it - and it is necessary for a number of things.

My wife and I decided that it's probably easier (and much cheaper) to get married again in Argentina than to deal with the amount of red tape involved.

The conversation in the registro was funny:
"You have to go to a lawyer, who presents to a judge, then the judge decides if your marriage can be recognized in Argentina."
"Sounds easier to just get married here."
"But you can't, you're already married."
"But you just told us that we're not."
"Asi que........................"

The US government readily recognized my Argentine marriage at the Embassy in Palermo. What about "reciprocity?"

Oops, I forgot...that's only when US citizens want to visit and Argentina can charge them for the privilege of doing so.
 

Girino

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Just to be clear, an Italian living in the US is legally required to register his US marriage with the Italian govt?


Yes. As an Italian citizen, you must report any status change affecting you or your family to the nearest Italian authority (e.g. Embassy or Consulate). This is true in case of marriage, death, divorce, legal separation, birth, adoption, change of name/surname, change of residence, etc. (so if you move to Argentina, you should let the Italian authority know). This way they can trace you so that you can vote from abroad, and they will provide you with assistance to renew your documents or in case of emergency.

Anyway, in case both spouses are Italian citizens, it is sufficient that the communication is made by only one of them. We went to the consulate together and they were trying to bounce me back at the gate because the appointment was under my husband's name. How can you NOT love Italians?!

The Italian consulate of Buenos Aires specifies also that a birth from married parents won't be registered if the marriage between the parents hasn't been registered first (unless the marriage occurred in Italy or before the Italian consul, of course). See here.
 

jbeas176

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I have an American friend that first married in the US. then returned to argentina and had both the civil and religious ceremonies. maybe he knew something.
 

ElCordobés

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My wife and I decided that it's probably easier (and much cheaper) to get married again in Argentina than to deal with the amount of red tape involved.

The conversation in the registro was funny:
"You have to go to a lawyer, who presents to a judge, then the judge decides if your marriage can be recognized in Argentina."
"Sounds easier to just get married here."
"But you can't, you're already married."
"But you just told us that we're not."
"Asi que........................"

Haha. I love it. We were considering this option. 14th anniversary this month. Maybe time to renew the vows as Argentines. ;)

Then there's the Italian question. Do I have to report both my marriages to the same woman! :huh:
 

Girino

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Then there's the Italian question. Do I have to report both my marriages to the same woman! :huh:

I am no lawyer here, but common sense tells me that you cannot marry twice (even to a different woman), unless you divorce your first wife. So the 2nd marriage would not be recognized in Italy, just the first one. Of course, they have no mean to tell you were already married, but in case your 1st wife/children get pissed at you at some point, they could very well enforce your 1st unreported marriage for the purpose of ailments/inheritance.
 

ajoknoblauch

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Haha. I love it. We were considering this option. 14th anniversary this month. Maybe time to renew the vows as Argentines. ;)

Then there's the Italian question. Do I have to report both my marriages to the same woman! :huh:

And be thrown in jail immediately for bigamy...
 

Girino

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And be thrown in jail immediately for bigamy...

Sure the Italians won't jail you, it such a silly country... Maybe the law says you will, but then a good lawyer, a reduction being it your first conviction, considering it is not a Criminal offence... Nothing will happen, maybe a fine or a lawyer bill. And then you'll love being Italian!
But, seriously speaking, I wouldn't mess up with these things - they are already enough complicate as they are.
 
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