Vegetables

flashyashi

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Where does one go to find lettuce and other vegetables and fruits in the city? I know this sounds stupid but in the states I would make green smoothies and what not and always used almond milk and I am having a dietary meltdown here in AR so far. Any input is helpful :)
 

Crema Americana

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There are fruit and vegetable stands everywhere! :p

Many Argentines don't eat much fruits or veggies, but they're around! Might have to walk a couple blocks. I've had better luck buying from the small verdurerias than from the supermarket.
 

flashyashi

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Yeah I find the supermarket is lacking in the veggie department. Let's just say its no whole foods or trader joes here haha.
 

jp

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I find the vegetables on the corner a vast improvement to the crap supermarkets punt out back home. Cheaper, tastier and less distance from the field to my plate.

Avoid supermarkets, and develop a relationship with a good local verduleria - it will end up making you a happier, healthier expat.
 

Zissou

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Agree. Other than at Whole Foods or Trader Joes and in major cities, I am actually pretty amazed at how abysmal the majority of produce is in the US. Canada is slightly better but primarily bc we shop mostly at large national grocery stores that do import in a lot.

I LOVE that the tomatoes here TASTE like the tomatoes I remember of my youth.

Additionally, a lot of produce here is a lot closer to organic that what gets the LABEL of organic at home, but really... is organic at such a technical level it's a travesty. (products labeled natural, bio, or organic are barely regulated to say the least).

That said, while the gorgeous and pricy fruit and veggies sections at Jumbo probably look better, I find it is the small verdelurias that will have the better, fresher and cheaper products. I really love that most things are actually ripe!
 

buddha

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Zissou said:
Agree. Other than at Whole Foods or Trader Joes and in major cities, I am actually pretty amazed at how abysmal the majority of produce is in the US. Canada is slightly better but primarily bc we shop mostly at large national grocery stores that do import in a lot.

I LOVE that the tomatoes here TASTE like the tomatoes I remember of my youth.

Additionally, a lot of produce here is a lot closer to organic that what gets the LABEL of organic at home, but really... is organic at such a technical level it's a travesty. (products labeled natural, bio, or organic are barely regulated to say the least).

That said, while the gorgeous and pricy fruit and veggies sections at Jumbo probably look better, I find it is the small verdelurias that will have the better, fresher and cheaper products. I really love that most things are actually ripe!

Zissou,

I have to make one comment to your post. The tomatoes here do taste ok but the biggest issue here is they refridgerate them and that is the WORST thing you can do to a fresh tom. It actually changes the taste composition and you lose most of the flavor, google it and you will see. Now, the toms in stores where I'm from(midwest usa) suck due to the fact that they pick them green and then gas them to achieve red color. I buy toms here as they are better then I can get at home but I am lucky enough to have large garden at home and I grow over 15 types with close to 25 plants so I get plenty of fresh toms in the summer.

I like that they pick them here and they go right to market, they need to stop putting them in the fridge. Google it and see what you get.
 

starlucia

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Gross, never buy your produce at a BA supermarket...that stuff always looks like they resurrected it out of a garbage bin. Take advantage of the gazillion verdulerias, or the random guys selling dirt-cheap seasonal produce on the sidewalks. Like JP says, find a local favorite and you'll be treated well (the verdulero will tell you when an avocado isn't ripe or the basil is too wilted, will throw in some free extras or set aside an item you buy on a daily basis.) Some people have mentioned their experiences with organic produce delivery services such as Tallo Verde.

Almond milk is a no-go, unless you're willing to shell out massive pesos.There's soy milk, but be aware that any Argentine-produced soy products are GMO (I did find, in Chinatown, a non-GMO soy milk imported from Hong Kong.) You can buy fresh fruit and vegetable juices at places like Buenos Aires Verde, Pura Vida, Natural Deli, etc.
 

RichardP

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Don't despair flashy,
The mercado de San Telmo has a few good verdulerias if you don't mind the trip. As others have said, find one near your house and they will treat you right. Eating healthy is a bit more work here, but not impossible.
 
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