Venting on BAexpats...

NomadTrader

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I am one of the quiet lurkers that occasionally visits this site.

I used to cringe a little reading the criticisms and complaints about Argentine society/politics/behaviors.

Something inside me used to think it was inappropriate and in poor taste to come to a forum -for foreigners- and talk about things we don't like about the locals.

I've spent half my adult life outside my home country. I've volunteered, worked, studied, and traveled all around the globe. I've always strived to be open to different perspectives and ways of thinking. After being in Argentina for 14 months straight. -My perspective has changed. I have come to realize that Argentina is a uniquely 'special' society. Maybe I'm just getting old in my thinking- but this is something I have strived hard to prevent.

I think a little venting is necessary and healthy part of living in Argentina as a foreigner. There is something very corrosive and toxic about this society. The paranoia, the fear, the xenophobia, the authoritarian impulse, the arrogant self-righteousness, the lack of consideration...I think it can drag you down if you don't find ways to cope.

That is all.
 

Wade K.

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I am one of the quiet lurkers that occasionally visits this site.

I used to cringe a little reading the criticisms and complaints about Argentine society/politics/behaviors.

Something inside me used to think it was inappropriate and in poor taste to come to a forum -for foreigners- and talk about things we don't like about the locals.

I've spent half my adult life outside my home country. I've volunteered, worked, studied, and traveled all around the globe. I've always strived to be open to different perspectives and ways of thinking. After being in Argentina for 14 months straight. -My perspective has changed. I have come to realize that Argentina is a uniquely 'special' society. Maybe I'm just getting old in my thinking- but this is something I have strived hard to prevent.

I think a little venting is necessary and healthy part of living in Argentina as a foreigner. There is something very corrosive and toxic about this society. The paranoia, the fear, the xenophobia, the authoritarian impulse, the arrogant self-righteousness, the lack of consideration...I think it can drag you down if you don't find ways to cope.

That is all.
Hey if you aren't the right kind of foreigner folks on the forum will vent about you too. :)
 

jblaze5779

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Yeah, you have to live here for at least a year to get past the tourist mindset and start realizing all the issues that exist. Once you start to live and work permanently and complete daily tasks like paying bills or getting a drivers license you realize how messed up things are.

I've visited over 30 countries in my travels and always thought the same thing "I could live here, this is awesome,.... why are people here complaining? " There is definitely a difference between tourist mindset and resident mindset.

Before I came I read that Argentines are the biggest users of mental health services. After being here for a couple years I know exactly why. This shit drives me crazy and it would be 1000 times worse if I knew I was stuck here with no other citizenship options. For me blowing off steam online has a similar effect on me.

If anything, this experience makes me appreciate the freedoms and modern lifestyle that I enjoy in my home country. People ask me what the best thing about living in Argentina is and I tell them it makes you realize how easy and convenient life is in the states. Lots of people back home like to complain about everything but I think they have no idea what the alternatives really are. People would be outraged if they missed their flight because a group of people were blocking the roads for 3 days or if their amazon prime order couldn't get there the same day because the distribution center was taken over by the local mob union.
 

Frank2000

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I am one of the quiet lurkers that occasionally visits this site.

I used to cringe a little reading the criticisms and complaints about Argentine society/politics/behaviors.

Something inside me used to think it was inappropriate and in poor taste to come to a forum -for foreigners- and talk about things we don't like about the locals.

I've spent half my adult life outside my home country. I've volunteered, worked, studied, and traveled all around the globe. I've always strived to be open to different perspectives and ways of thinking. After being in Argentina for 14 months straight. -My perspective has changed. I have come to realize that Argentina is a uniquely 'special' society. Maybe I'm just getting old in my thinking- but this is something I have strived hard to prevent.

I think a little venting is necessary and healthy part of living in Argentina as a foreigner. There is something very corrosive and toxic about this society. The paranoia, the fear, the xenophobia, the authoritarian impulse, the arrogant self-righteousness, the lack of consideration...I think it can drag you down if you don't find ways to cope.

That is all.
Argentinians have the right to and do criticize things that are wrong or bad in their country. If you live in Argentina, you also have the same right. What I think that is not right is when we start making prejudiced statements attributing certain characteristics to a whole group of people or society.



If you think there is not “The paranoia, the fear, the xenophobia, the authoritarian impulse, the arrogant self-righteousness, the lack of consideration” in other countries including in the USA, you are maybe not being very objective. As to the day to day problems of the country all Argentinians experience, such as inefficiencies, corruption, violence, crime, etc., are also very common in many other developing nations.



Yes, vent by all means. You too are Argentinian (maybe a recent one and a temporary one) But when we judge the whole society, we are indeed being close minded or prejudiced.
 

semigoodlookin

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If you think there is not “The paranoia, the fear, the xenophobia, the authoritarian impulse, the arrogant self-righteousness, the lack of consideration” in other countries including in the USA, you are maybe not being very objective. As to the day to day problems of the country all Argentinians experience, such as inefficiencies, corruption, violence, crime, etc., are also very common in many other developing nations.
You're right, of course, but there are levels. If you live in New Zealand, where corruption is not widespread or obvious, and then live in Argentina where it is significantly worse, naturally you will notice this more easily. Does corruption happen in New Zealand? Yes. Does it happen as glaringly obvous and often as in Argentina? No. See the same for inefficiencies, violence, crime.

As misguided as it is for people to complain about Argentina and claim other countries don't have similar problems, it's eqaully as misguided to pass off all complaints as "oh well, it happens in other countries too."
 

Greg S

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This all seems rather silly. Your financial status determines your quality of life wherever you live. This has been true since Narmer, the first pharaoh of ancient Egypt. It continues with today's pharaohs Bezos and Musk. It will always be so. We very much enjoy our summers in Argentina. Sorry if you can't. Life is short. Enjoy it.
 

¡Sencillamente yo!

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This all seems rather silly. Your financial status determines your quality of life wherever you live. This has been true since Narmer, the first pharaoh of ancient Egypt. It continues with today's pharaohs Bezos and Musk. It will always be so. We very much enjoy our summers in Argentina. Sorry if you can't. Life is short. Enjoy it.
Greg - YOU NAILED IT!

Money can't buy a person their health, in some case it can buy happiness, but in all cases it does determine PHYSICAL QUALITY of life and accommodation. The amount of money you have is directly related to the physicals side of things. Experiences you can afford such as travel and entertainment, possessions you can own and place where you live etc... But if a person does not have a lot of money, they can still come pretty close if they can stop the wanting and enjoy the same 24 hours, not caring about too much or too many things I think.
 

Ceviche

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People ask me what the best thing about living in Argentina is and I tell them it makes you realize how easy and convenient life is in the states. Lots of people back home like to complain about everything but I think they have no idea what the alternatives really are. People would be outraged if they missed their flight because a group of people were blocking the roads for 3 days or if their amazon prime order couldn't get there the same day because the distribution center was taken over by the local mob union.

You obviously have no idea hows life in Congo or Myanmar or Bangladesh.

Argentina is heaven if the perspective is reversed.

There are approximately 200 countries in the world. Argentina, USA, New Zealand are just 3 of them ; and none of these three are the centre of the universe.
 
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