Visa/Residency advice - Student Visa, citizenship, forming a S.A.

Maxwell

Registered
Hey group! First time posting but long time reader.

I've been in the country for 3.5 years now making visa runs (only just recently realized that this doesn't really protect me from anything).

I'm currently working in country as an independent health and fitness consultant and would like to legalize my situation here so that I can continue to work without the fear of being denied at the border.

I'm currently looking into obtaining a student visa to take some courses at UCES since my Spanish is now at a good enough level to do so and because I have heard that this would allow me to apply for a monotributo. One question that came to mind on this front - Is there a greater chance that I will be denied for a student visa and therefore deported because of all of the visa runs that I have made previously?

Or is there a more direct route to legalization considering the fact that I have already been in the country for 3.5 years more or less uninterrupted? I have read on other threads the mention of obtaining citizenship. Would this be a dual citizenship or does this require you to renounce you current citizenship?

Another option that has been brought up to me is forming a S.A. with an argentine president and then hiring yourself. I still don't understand all of the intricacies of this method. How costly is this procedure? Would this require a certain amount of initial investment or to own a physical space? Currently I only pay a small rental fee for a shared space.

Any suggestions or advice on this matter would be greatly appreciated.
 

dsp27

Registered
Hi Maxwell. I do not believe that Migraciones would deny your potential student visa because of the visa runs. THEY let you in, and you have stamps in your passport showing that they authorized you to stay for this period. Now I presume you have never overstayed? In Argentina overstaying is an administrative infringement resolved by paying a fine, as long as you have not overstayed more than 2 times. On the 3rd time you will almost certainly be denied entry.

I also did visa runs for 2 or 3 years but then managed to get temp residency (and I had overstayed once).
 

JeffR

Registered
Hi Maxwell,

Have you considered scheduling a consultation with an immigration attorney? They understand the system and know the ropes, so to speak, and would be able to develop the best plan for you specific situation.
 

steveinbsas

Registered
Have you considered scheduling a consultation with an immigration attorney? They understand the system and know the ropes, so to speak, and would be able to develop the best plan for you specific situation.
I suggest you contact Javier Segura at Cassiopeia Immigration Services. He speaks perfect English, has a great deal of experience, and is very friendly.

 

Maxwell

Registered
Hi Maxwell. I do not believe that Migraciones would deny your potential student visa because of the visa runs. THEY let you in, and you have stamps in your passport showing that they authorized you to stay for this period. Now I presume you have never overstayed? In Argentina overstaying is an administrative infringement resolved by paying a fine, as long as you have not overstayed more than 2 times. On the 3rd time you will almost certainly be denied entry.

I also did visa runs for 2 or 3 years but then managed to get temp residency (and I had overstayed once).
Ya, that's correct. No overstays to date.

Hoping I will be able to get all the documents necessary processed for a student visa (considering I continue to push in that direction) before my current 90 days expires in early April.
 

Maxwell

Registered
Hi Maxwell,

Have you considered scheduling a consultation with an immigration attorney? They understand the system and know the ropes, so to speak, and would be able to develop the best plan for you specific situation.
Hey Jeff,

Ya I have already met with one lawyer who strongly pushed me in the student visa direction. He briefly mentioned some other options but brushed them aside because of the costs associated.

The fee for processing the student visa with this lawyer ($800USD before procedural processing costs) seemed to be a little high so I was interested in getting a lay of the land first. The international student department head at UCES didn't feel like it would be difficult to do on my own, but that is still to be seen.
 

Maxwell

Registered
I suggest you contact Javier Segura at Cassiopeia Immigration Services. He speaks perfect English, has a great deal of experience, and is very friendly.

I think I'll do that. Thanks Steve
 

ventanilla

Registered
Monotributo does nothing to help you get residency or a visa and there's no practical way for an independent worker to get a visa aside from a student visa or citizenship.
 

ventanilla

Registered
I should add that this is the same advice I received from 2 different immigration lawyers. They advised me to look for a regular job, apply for citizenship, or simply hope that new categories are added soon.

If you want to go the student visa route, the 3 month renewable visa for studying Spanish is MUCH cheaper than the visa for studying a proper university degree, I believe.
 

Maxwell

Registered
Monotributo does nothing to help you get residency or a visa and there's no practical way for an independent worker to get a visa aside from a student visa or citizenship.
Ya, that's the conclusion that I came to as well.

I believe that I can apply for that after I've received my student visa therefore resolving both my immigration and taxation dilemmas.
 
Top