Walking, Biking and Transit in Buenos Aires

London2Baires

Registered
Thanks for sharing, some interesting insights here for those not familiar with the topic.

From my perspective, and I use both the public infrastructure, and powered/non powered skateboards/longboards a lot; I'd say bike lanes, trains , underground , and busses, are great in terms of coverage and connectivity in caba and gba. They are patchy in terms of quality, but generally pretty good in my view. (Specially for the price!)

Personally I always wonder why people waste time sitting in their hot cars in traffic when they could be using trains for long distance and then cycling, electric scooters/skateboards etc for anything within 10 km. Sure, sometimes a car may be a good idea for some people and use cases (some notable ones like families with smaller children or disability related issues), but I suspect a large and significant amount of people would be benefitted and surprised trying the alternatives.

Cheers!
 

Aztangogirl

Registered
Thanks for sharing, some interesting insights here for those not familiar with the topic.

From my perspective, and I use both the public infrastructure, and powered/non powered skateboards/longboards a lot; I'd say bike lanes, trains , underground , and busses, are great in terms of coverage and connectivity in caba and gba. They are patchy in terms of quality, but generally pretty good in my view. (Specially for the price!)

Personally I always wonder why people waste time sitting in their hot cars in traffic when they could be using trains for long distance and then cycling, electric scooters/skateboards etc for anything within 10 km. Sure, sometimes a car may be a good idea for some people and use cases (some notable ones like families with smaller children or disability related issues), but I suspect a large and significant amount of people would be benefitted and surprised trying the alternatives.

Cheers!
Transportation was one of the reasons I wanted to move here. I have had a car my entire adult life. You can't live in most parts of the U.S. without a car. I am so happy to not drive anymore. Without the expense of a car, I can live on my social security here. I just took my first long distance train to Sierra Ventana. Sleeper car. It was a great experience. Between walking, the Subte, the Colectivo and taxis when I feel lazy, I get everywhere I need to go. For less money a month than it costs to fill your gas tank once.
 

Ries

Registered
its not uncommon for me to be on the colectivo and/or subte 6 to 10 times a day. Yesterday I was on a 128 at 9:30 am and a 39 at just past midnight. Rapid transit in Seattle, near where I live in the states, averages 10 times the cost per ride.
 

dilmah

Registered
its not uncommon for me to be on the colectivo and/or subte 6 to 10 times a day. Yesterday I was on a 128 at 9:30 am and a 39 at just past midnight. Rapid transit in Seattle, near where I live in the states, averages 10 times the cost per ride.
on the other hand, Puget Sound features extensive ferry network.
Comparing ferry prices Seattle is cheaper than Buquebus.
 

Johnny

Registered
Transportation was one of the reasons I wanted to move here. I have had a car my entire adult life. You can't live in most parts of the U.S. without a car. I am so happy to not drive anymore. Without the expense of a car, I can live on my social security here. I just took my first long distance train to Sierra Ventana. Sleeper car. It was a great experience. Between walking, the Subte, the Colectivo and taxis when I feel lazy, I get everywhere I need to go. For less money a month than it costs to fill your gas tank once.
So true. I left the states in 2006 and haven't owned a car since. Less money and fewer headaches.
 

Ries

Registered
on the other hand, Puget Sound features extensive ferry network.
Comparing ferry prices Seattle is cheaper than Buquebus.
The difference is nobody lives in BA and works in Montevideo, and has to take the Buquebus every day. I have many friends in the trades who have to commute to island jobs in construction, and take their tools and materials, and its $75 USD per day for the commute. Virtually everything in Washington State is at least double the cost of Argentina, with the sole exception of electronics and other chinese imports. Obviously the effective 100% markup on imports in Argentina is more- but for anything made in Washington, versus made in Argentina, the costs are much much more.
 

dilmah

Registered
Virtually everything in Washington State is at least double the cost of Argentina, with the sole exception of electronics and other chinese imports.
"electronics and other chinese imports" covers just too many useful things, absence of which makes life miserable.

cars and RVs and motorcycles are likely significantly cheaper in the US. Key point is of similar quality and similar models.
Autopista tolls -- one can drive from Seattle to Spokane, or to Boise, or to Portland, or to Los Angeles without paying a penny of tolls.
And one doesn't even need to take any byway route to avoid tolls between above mentioned cities.
If one tries to drive from BsAs to Mar del Plata it's just endless toll booths.

One could say that tolls are hidden in gas prices in the US but gas is not cheaper in Argentina.
 

Ries

Registered
First- My main interest in posting on this thread was to agree how easy, cheap, and convenient public transport is in BA, and how much you learn by walking as well.

But the argument of US versus Argentine prices is one we have had here many times.
I have been living in both places for almost 12 years now. I know exactly what the cost differences are between Washington State and CABA. And I can say that my cost of living, for the same or better quality life, is much less in Buenos Aires, and has been every year for the last 12. YMMV.
 
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