What Do You Tell Immigrations Upon Entering The Country?

natykerouac

Registered
If I enter Argentina on a tourist visa, but my departure flight date is 6 months after arrival because I plan to get my student visa while I'm there, how do I prove this to them? I can't say I'm on vacation because my stay is more than 90 days and I can't prove I'm going to study there because I have to apply in person so I'll only have a tourist visa. Would it be better to buy a one-way ticket? Or set the departure for less than 90 days? I don't want any trouble..
 

Girino

Registered
Hi,

usually you should provide for an exit ticket before boarding (i.e. at the airport in the US), doesn't matter if it is a return ticket to the US or elsewhere.
You can simply book a cheap ticket to Uruguay showing that you will be exiting the country within 90 days.

Besides, here you can extend your tourist visa to up 180 days paying a fee (300 ARS, if I am not wrong), so I believe the issue is really if you don't have an exit ticket or if you have one but it is for more than 180 days.
 

Rich One

Registered
One way ticket will NOT work . One way ticket plus a Buquebus ticket to colonia may work . A RT ticket with return leg under 90 days, with an extension clause better , with a penalty.
 

Ries

Registered
I have flown into Ezieza well over a dozen times. Never once have I had to tell em anything.
Never once had anyone at immigration ask me for a return ticket, either.
You fill out the form in advance, you hand it and your passport to them. They tell you to take off your hat, they take your picture, they take your fingerprint, they rubber stamp, they hand you back your stuff.
they have neither time nor interest in asking you about your travel plans or your plane ticket.

it is true, that certain airlines, in certain countries, wont let you on without a return ticket.
But immigration? NOt if you are travelling on a US or Euro passport.
 

PhilipDT

Registered
I've never been asked for onward travel by immigrations, not once in 20+ entries.

That doesn't mean it won't happen to you, just that it hasn't happened to me.
 

Crema Americana

Registered
Keep the round-trip ticket. Even if you don't use the return leg, it's often more economical anyway. If they ask, just say you're visiting as a tourist and want to learn/practice Spanish. If they ask further about the length of your stay, you can also say that you're planning to visit some of the bordering countries. I doubt they'll give you a hard time though. Just be honest and keep the answers short.
 

Napoleon

Registered
One way ticket will NOT work . One way ticket plus a Buquebus ticket to colonia may work . A RT ticket with return leg under 90 days, with an extension clause better , with a penalty.
I think that I've only flown here once with a Round-Trip ticket. Every other ticket EVER has been "One Way". I've never had a question, ever. Never once.

So my What do you tell immigration? is more like "Hola... good morning." And then I usually yawn and then cover my mouth and say "Sorry. Excuse me."

That's what I tell "Inmigraciones".
 

Rich One

Registered
I think that I've only flown here once with a Round-Trip ticket. Every other ticket EVER has been "One Way". I've never had a question, ever. Never once.

So my What do you tell immigration? is more like "Hola... good morning." And then I usually yawn and then cover my mouth and say "Sorry. Excuse me."

That's what I tell "Inmigraciones".
several previous threads dealt with the problems experienced by travelers that were not allowed to board a flight with a One Way ticket? I may have dream t it then :cool:

Quote from a previous old thread

[background=rgb(252, 252, 252)]The issue of whether a one-way ticket will cut it or not is an issue that rests entirely with the airlines.The Argentine immigration web site states that the only requirement for entry into the country is a valid passport. Unfortunately, if you dig deeper into the immigration requirements, you will find that Argentina lays full responsibility for enforcing entry requirements with the airlines. For whatever reason, some airlines at some locations have chosen to insist that proof of the fact you are leaving Argentina within a certain period is necessary before they will board you (despite the fact they may have sold you a one-way ticket). And this proof is often interpretted to be a two-way ticket. Although I have never had this problem, many others have. You need to check with the airline you are flying with, and at the location you are flying from, to determine if you can fly here on a one-way ticket. [/background]
 
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