What This Means For Ex Pats

Daniel82

Registered
As this is an ex pat forum, and just being as candid as I can, aside from the frustrations of getting dollars, not being able to obtain certain imported items (which now albeit being able to get are still way too expensive so I don’t even bother), and of course, just feeling a sense of disorder and chaos, I must admit that within the years 2009-2012, my ex pat life (which depended obviously on income earned outside of Argentina) was considerably more affordable than it was under the Macri government (as a matter of fact I left because I just couldn’t seem to “keep up”)

Safety and security seemed to be a bigger concern under the K government, as it did seem to me that more people would get mugged, etc (at least this was my perception and what actually occurred to me) and visually there were always less police manning the streets.

From a tourist perspective, a lot of my overseas visitors still felt like in regards to dining and for the most part tourism (although most hotels have always charged their rates in USD) they were getting really good deals and enjoyed visiting often, whereas now they always feel ripped off.

How do you think a return to the K government ways will affect expats/tourists? Will it be a full throttle K return (currency block, investment block: foreign providers having to close up shop again because of not being able to import any merchandise, planes for all and their sister, etc), surely real estate particular foreign buying may take a hit as a consequence of the uncertainty, or will this be a more “version light” of CFK?
 

Somewhereinba

Registered
I think it will be a 'lighter' version but the end result will be the same. The markets will do the talking and inflation will continue on its merry way. I just hope it doesn't turn violent - I can deal with the other shit. The K's will keep rolling out the USA is evil line and most likely reneg on their commitments to the IMF which will cause a problem way bigger than the current recession. Those with dollars and those in Government and high positions will be the winners. The poor will have pesos thrown at them to keep them satisfied (futbol para todos yipee !!) but achieve no true improvement to their future and the middle class will suffer the most as we have seen today with mass devaluation of the pesos and severe decrease in purchasing power. Infrastructure will also go back to being left to shit - it was starting to improve.
 

Daniel82

Registered
I agree that it was starting to improve, however I also have to say that unfortunately Argentina isn’t a country that can afford long wait times for said improvement. Argentines are inpatient, have very little memory, and vote however their same-day economic panorama looks like, and let’s face it, most of the lower and middle classes are struggling and a lot worst off than 4 years ago and simply don’t understand that for such a large and populated country to repair decades of damage, it requires time. Time which unfortunately many can’t wait to see. It’s nice and well to see upper middle/upper classes say “all you need is time” when they can comfortably retreat to their Recoleta homes and not have to penny pinch to pay their basic bills, but for the average Joe it’s a huge struggle and not one they are willing to endure. So, sadly, it’s a double edged sword, in my opinion.
 

Fiscal

Registered
They just jack up the prices of everything to adjust for inflation so I don't see much changing. Labor, food, Uber, and hotels will still be cheap. Consumer goods and groceries will still be expensive relative to the us.
 

Daniel82

Registered
They just jack up the prices of everything to adjust for inflation so I don't see much changing. Labor, food, Uber, and hotels will still be cheap. Consumer goods and groceries will still be expensive relative to the us.
A huge part of their (K+K) argument/promise is based on them telling Argentines they will be “happy again” (IE: be able to afford the basics, control the tarifazos, purchase a car, etc) I must say, under CFK, I did see that a lot more of my Argentine friends consumed more (albeit paying it all off in like 50 quotas) Whether this is going to be done again by cooking the numbers... of you’ll recall even The Economist had an article with Cristina as a witch stirring a cauldron... heavily subsidising things to unrealistic levels or all this was just demagoguery to win votes, beats me, but half the population is eating it up.
 

Rich One

Registered
Maximo Kirchner was the first one to give the Acceptance speech for the Fernandez Victory Act. The Campora is back....!
 

Somewhereinba

Registered
Only some special countries are capable of having such large scale corruption over a long term dominate their presidency and then avoid any prosecution and end up as Vice President. It's amazing and what makes Argentina who it is today. It seems most of Argentina would prefer to be given a fish than learn how to fish and provide for themselves. The Government is viewed as a provider of goods and services - this is because of long term conditioning by the K governments the same way dogs are servants to their owners who provide food. Now too many people are conditioned to receive for little effort - the only way this changes is through future generations and OPEN education that does not feed UBA propaganda to the young minds like our poor Bajo. History has already tried the socialist model and proven it does not work in large populations with low output (Argentina). Capitalism is not perfect either but it is a damn side better than what the K's offer - again I suggest everyone go look at Venezuela for the direction Argentina is now heading.
 

sergio

Registered
It means move your ass somewhere else and visit here when you want too. That is what it means.
I think this is true and I know a few Argentines who are trying to do that.
We are assuming of course that CFK will be back - and it looks that way. I'd expect currency controls, restrictions on use of credit cards abroad, more controls on the sale of real estate, possible revival of the visa for US tourists, hostile relations with the US but better relations with Cuba, Venezuela, Iran. Continued inflation. Macri gave a little hope, especially early on. That will vanish.
 

Bajo_cero2

Registered
A huge part of their (K+K) argument/promise is based on them telling Argentines they will be “happy again” (IE: be able to afford the basics, control the tarifazos, purchase a car, etc) I must say, under CFK, I did see that a lot more of my Argentine friends consumed more (albeit paying it all off in like 50 quotas) Whether this is going to be done again by cooking the numbers... of you’ll recall even The Economist had an article with Cristina as a witch stirring a cauldron... heavily subsidising things to unrealistic levels or all this was just demagoguery to win votes, beats me, but half the population is eating it up.
Was it realistic to take 150 billion usd for capital flight?
 
Top