When I move here what special things should I bring that are hard to get?

rob0001

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What special items, that I actually can bring into the country, should I bring with me?
 

lunar

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Redpossum

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Sure, of course...but then where do I store them? Can I open a dollar bank account in BA and then can I take out what I need? Is that safe to do?
1) Did you read Papillon?
2) Yes, you can, once you have a DNI.
3) No, it most emphatically is not safe to do so.


This is a very limited and sanitized version of what happened.

Basically, the government confiscated everyone's dollar deposits, and gave them pesos or peso denominated bonds at 1-1 when the peso was only worth 20-25 cents US. So the middle class got ripped off for 75-80% of their savings. Meanwhile, the elites were warned in advance, and moved their money offshore temporarily. Then when the economy crashed and people were scrounging for food in trash cans, they brought their dollars back and bought up real estate and other hard assets for a tiny percentage of real value.

On top of this, some debts were also converted, so big businesses with political connections escaped 75-80% of their dollar-denominated debts.

It was a massive transfer of wealth from the middle class to the elites.

***EDIT***
I realize that some of the answers you are getting here seem insufferable and condescending, but that's not our intention. We are trying to be helpful and warn you. But the thing is that we are all torn between our love of Argentina and the awareness that this is a dangerous place to live, not danger of street thugs but danger from governments and politicians and banks, who are thieves and criminals of a much larger scale, against whom it is very difficult to protect oneself. And this conflict produces in all of us a sort of cognitive dissonance that makes us seem horribly edgy when we try to talk about our beloved second home. We don't mean to be nasty and sarky, even if we come off that way.
 
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Redpossum

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OK, OK, separate post, original question, what should you bring.

1) Blistex, the white cream in a soft toothpaste-tube, not the chapstick in the hard cylinder.

2) High quality soap, if you can get it cheap at Trader Joe's or some such, The French-made stuff is good. Common white shower soap here will eat the top layer of skin off your body, which is really uncomfortable on the naughty bits. I buy glycerine soap to escape this, but it melts away so fast. I gave a gift of some some quality hard-milled French soap to the Brazilian wife of an American friend, and her gratitude was effusive enough to be embarrassing. She'd apparently never used anything of the kind before. Some things the French do really well. Not many, but some.

3) Charmin is too bulky to bring, but prepare yourself for brutal harsh toilet paper. A bigger issue for women than for men, but even Elite isn't Charmin, and the cheaper brands are like wiping your ass with sandpaper. Ouch.

4. A couple different quality options for carrying money concealed under your clothes.

5. Underwear and shoes. Both are shit quality here. Bring lots.

6. Brightly colored bandanas. Wonderful for small gifts. Only available here in basic "Crips & Bloods" red and blue, and not common even then.

7. A couple good warm coats, like a down jacket, those will crush down small.

8. Blue jeans, several extra pairs.
 

rob0001

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1) Did you read Papillon?
2) Yes, you can, once you have a DNI.
3) No, it most emphatically is not safe to do so.


This is a very limited and sanitized version of what happened.

Basically, the government confiscated everyone's dollar deposits, and gave them pesos or peso denominated bonds at 1-1 when the peso was only worth 20-25 cents US. So the middle class got ripped off for 75-80% of their savings. Meanwhile, the elites were warned in advance, and moved their money offshore temporarily. Then when the economy crashed and people were scrounging for food in trash cans, they brought their dollars back and bought up real estate and other hard assets for a tiny percentage of real value.

On top of this, some debts were also converted, so big businesses with political connections escaped 75-80% of their dollar-denominated debts.

It was a massive transfer of wealth from the middle class to the elites.

***EDIT***
I realize that some of the answers you are getting here seem insufferable and condescending, but that's not our intention. We are trying to be helpful and warn you. But the thing is that we are all torn between our love of Argentina and the awareness that this is a dangerous place to live, not danger of street thugs but danger from governments and politicians and banks, who are thieves and criminals of a much larger scale, against whom it is very difficult to protect oneself. And this conflict produces in all of us a sort of cognitive dissonance that makes us seem horribly edgy when we try to talk about our beloved second home. We don't mean to be nasty and sarky, even if we come off that way.
No problem at all...I lived for 10 years in Thailand and Cambodia...much the same problem with insane governments (but pretty good economies really)...my favorite description of the Thai government is; teenagers without any adult supervision. Cambodia is not much better.
Sadly, I feel the USA is headed for worse for multiple reasons...but that's another story.
I have spent much time on other boards before...you guys are SAINTS compared to all of them!
 

rob0001

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OK, OK, separate post, original question, what should you bring.

1) Blistex, the white cream in a soft toothpaste-tube, not the chapstick in the hard cylinder.

2) High quality soap, if you can get it cheap at Trader Joe's or some such, The French-made stuff is good. Common white shower soap here will eat the top layer of skin off your body, which is really uncomfortable on the naughty bits. I buy glycerine soap to escape this, but it melts away so fast. I gave a gift of some some quality hard-milled French soap to the Brazilian wife of an American friend, and her gratitude was effusive enough to be embarrassing. She'd apparently never used anything of the kind before. Some things the French do really well. Not many, but some.

3) Charmin is too bulky to bring, but prepare yourself for brutal harsh toilet paper. A bigger issue for women than for men, but even Elite isn't Charmin, and the cheaper brands are like wiping your ass with sandpaper. Ouch.

4. A couple different quality options for carrying money concealed under your clothes.

5. Underwear and shoes. Both are shit quality here. Bring lots.

6. Brightly colored bandanas. Wonderful for small gifts. Only available here in basic "Crips & Bloods" red and blue, and not common even then.

7. A couple good warm coats, like a down jacket, those will crush down small.

8. Blue jeans, several extra pairs.
Exactly the type of info I needed...thank you!
 

donnay

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A selection of what people ask me to bring:
Twist ties
Underwear
Mascara and other makeup, perfume.
Electronics, like cellphones, computers, etc
Birdseed (No , I'm not kidding)
Jeans
Vitamins
Pumpkin spice
Hot sauce, salad dressing
Bagel slicer
Curtains
 

Newman_ZA

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I really try to immerse myself into the culture of a place and try not to think of things I miss from my before times but there are three things that I miss that are difficult to shake.

1) Don't know if it is the same in BA but, in Mendoza there is like no variety of chips (crisps). Cheese and like one other flavour and very few styles of chips. Potato and some corn chips and that's it. I know that is difficult to bring in but, I have chip cravings and the cheese flavoured potato chips don't hit the spot.

2) If you are not into mate and you like teas then you will not like the tea selection here. You can't find good tasting tea here that is strong and tastes good. Its my one thing that I have tried to bring in but with little luck.

3) Good quality mens shoes. Tough to find pairs that fit. Granted I even had this issue in my home country. I have size 11/12 feet with a high instep. It feels like outside of hiking boots, every pair I try sucks and either doesn't fit or is uncomfortable.
 
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