31% of Argentina's young have not completed secondary education

jantango

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My contact with young people is usually at the dumpsters when I see them removing the trash and then leaving it on the street. As two young men walked away from the mess they made on the corner of my block yesterday, I considered what kind of future they have. They ignored my request to return the garbage to the dumpster. If all they do is rummage through garbage all day, they are probably unqualified to get a job especially without a secondary education. That's sad, but they have the choice to complete their education.
 

antipodean

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I’m not sure they have so much “choice” to complete their education in this country. Many come from one room homes without food on the table and/ or without space for older kids, forcing them out to make money however possible to have something to eat and / or a place to live. Others are forced out of education due to the need to care for younger siblings in broken family situations, or worse still have kids of their own to care for. Poverty is a cycle that can’t be fixed by simply offering free education... most hungry kids just don’t understand how learning a periodic table can help them, especially when the free university education that follows secondary is utterly inaccessible to most (cost of food, housing, transport etc not free)

For these kids understanding the problem of littering in what they perceive as some “cheto” neighborhood is probably the furthest thing from their minds.
 

Moe

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Real question,

If the free university education is utterly inaccessible to most (cost of food, housing, transport etc not free), how then do so many Haitian students access Argentinian universities? Most arrive without fluent Spanish and aren't provided free food, housing or transport either.
 

elhombresinnombre

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Real question,

If the free university education is utterly inaccessible to most (cost of food, housing, transport etc not free), how then do so many Haitian students access Argentinian universities? Most arrive without fluent Spanish and aren't provided free food, housing or transport either.
A fascinating question. A real question in response. How many Haitian students do you estimate are in the Argentinian university system? Is the number inconsistent with the extent of the middle and upper classes in that country? Is there a sort-of cluster effect whereby you are more likely to encounter Haitians on some courses than others? Our kids have graduated now (medicine & architecture) and whilst they used to gossip about the odd Italian or Syrian on their courses - plus of course the many students from neighbouring countries - I don't recall either of them mentioning having met a Haitian
 

antipodean

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Good question. There are varying degrees of what we consider "poor" where even small differences mean a lot in terms of opportunity.
The majority of those who are emigrating from countries like Haiti were simply not in as extreme situations as many poor people here.
To start with, the flights from Haiti, passports, visas etc will easily cost a thousand dollars which requires either savings or access to borrowing in the first place.

I remember some Haitian students from UBA where they were certifying their Spanish before enrolling in other courses.
In general they lived in shared accommodations in suburbs a fair distance from the center and also worked in shops or as delivery drivers.
None of them had family here and by the sounds of it they arrived with at least some money to establish themselves with which they had apparently saved or received/ borrowed money from family who also lived abroad before coming here (Obviously if you have family living in the US or France and sending you even small remittances it would help. In terms of getting established having even a thousand dollars in savings in your pocket will be a tremendous advantage over someone who does not even have a few pesos left to buy food or bus ticket or phone credit with, let alone buy a bike to put to work or save for one.)
 

antipodean

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If poor kids the La Matanza are going to school just to get indoctrinated by nazi-esque profesorxs who intimidate students that think differently, I wouldn’t blame them if they did choose to drop out... remember that 16 year olds can vote here.
 

BAHibs

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To be expected when Juntos por el Cargo slash education spending year on year in CABA in order to fund some nice buildings for multi millionaires, combined with Vidal deciding to manage education just as well as health in her time in charge of the province it's a surprise that the numbers aren't higher.
 

antipodean

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What do you think, how common are incidents like this one?
There have been similar charges made before so I can’t say it is a totally isolated incident. But neither is it something be reported constantly either.
In La Matanza I also saw recent footage on the news of police vehicles transporting “militantes” to paint over and tear down opposition campaign photos. It is not a stretch of the imagination to think there is some level of illicit organization behind it. Especially since FDT fear that their votes are at real risk this time around in these areas.

To scream at a kid for essentially questioning why he has always been poor and had to endure the same old problems having lived most all of his life under CFK rule. Then giving him pathetic excuses that it is all because of 4 short years is nothing short of abuse and insult.... this only makes extremists like Milei gain more ground with young voters.
 
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