Chef's Knives

Napoleon

Registered
I'm thinking it's time to get a real Chef's Knife, but I'm wary of buying one in Argentina. So I'm thinking that I will buy one in the States and have someone bring it down here. (NOT in their "carry on" luggage.) ;)

Here is what I'm looking at:

I was looking at OVERSTOCK(.)COM & AMAZON and I think that Amazon seemed to have the better deals.

1) J.A. Henckels International Classic 8-Inch Stainless-Steel Chef's Knife
US$48 (down from US$80) The Link

2) Wüsthof Gourmet 8-Inch Cook's Knife
US$69.99 (down from US$85) The Link

3) Wüsthof Gourmet 7-Inch Hollow Cut Santoku Knife
US$49.95 (down from US$110) The Link

I can't imagine needing a 10" chef's knife. But is 7" Santoku too short? And why do people like a Santoku over a traditional chef's knife.

Are there stores in Buenos Aires where I can find these knives just to hold them in my hand?

I'm sure that the import taxes would be through the roof and the knives I've listed would be in the AR$400 range. BUT, if someone knows of a place to get a good chef's knife that won't cost an arm and a leg, I'm all ears. If not, could someone point me to a store to hold the things in my hand for a "test drive"?

Thanks,

Nappy
 

elhombresinnombre

Registered
Given the tradition of knife-making it seems a shame not to buy an Argentine knife. Mine was hand made by an old gaucho who was 120 years old if he was a day and still working on an estancia outside Rio Gallegos. He told me what I wanted - not the other way round - and while it looks exactly like the sort of knife that's been hand made by an old gaucho it never fails to impress others: whether it's ripping open a sheep carcass to prepare it for a palo or finely dicing onions in the kitchen. Okay: so I've used it precisely once for the ripping-open-sheep-carcases thing but it did it then with ease. Ten inch blade, by the way. I don't endorse going all the way down to El Culo Del Mundo just to buy a knife but if someone can suggest a source closer to Bs As I'd recommend taking a look at something home grown and hand made before fixing on buying an import.
 

Lucas

Registered
Napoleon said:
I'm thinking it's time to get a real Chef's Knife, but I'm wary of buying one in Argentina.....why?

BUT, if someone knows of a place to get a good chef's knife that won't cost an arm and a leg, I'm all ears. If not, could someone point me to a store to hold the things in my hand for a "test drive"?

Thanks,

Nappy
Nappy try Google.com.ar under cuchilleria

Someone who is on this trade recommend "Global" brand instead of "Wüsthof " have a look at www.cuchilleriavcrespo.com.ar

He has been using both of them and definitely is more than happy with Global here is what he said about them.

"Recently I am trailing my first GLOBAL, I bought the GS-3, the G-48 and the GSF-31. Also I bought a WUSTHOF as well by high recommendation of a friend chef of England, but the truth it did not convince me at all. Definitively I will remain with the GLOBAL one, an excellent cut (the best one than I have experimented), a truly beautiful design and an ideal weight. As a comparative reference I will say to you that the WUSTHOF cost me almost the triple amount of money than the G-48 that was the one more expensive of the GLOBAL brand, that been said remains to be seen how it will translated in duration through the years, but the truth is that I treat my knives like as they were my beloved children (mainly the expensive ones). Greetings…."


Chef Knives-Brands on sale

Av. Scalabrini Ortiz 197 - Capital Federal - Tel.: (54-011) 4854-6766

Medios de Transporte:
Colectivos: 15 - 24 - 57 - 71 - 76 - 65 - 109 - 110 - 127 - 141 - 168
Subte: Linea "B" Estación Malabia

Good luck and good cooking.
 

Ries

Registered
Global knives are nice, I own a few and like them- but they are stainless steel.
This is great for amateur hackers like me- but real professional chefs sneer at them.

A stainless knife just wont hold an edge the way a carbon steel knife will, so most serious chefs dont use em. A carbon steel knife will be sharper, and easier to sharpen and keep sharp, than a Global or other stainless knife will.
It will also require more attention and care- they will rust pretty quickly if you look the other way for five minutes.

So whether you will be satisfied with Global knives or not depends on your tastes and experiences.
They are japanese, very nicely designed, balanced well, and you can certainly cook with them. But even in Japan, real chefs dont use them.
Japanese chefs get on waiting lists to spend $300 to $800 for a knife from a known knifemaker- an individual knifemaker, not a company.
Japanese knife stores are amazing, with a huge range of quality, style, and prices.
 

Lucas

Registered
Global G Series Knives

The first Global knives were designed in 1985 by Komin Yamada whose remit was to develop a range of knives which was truly new and revolutionary, harnessing the best materials available and the most modern design concepts.

Global knives are made from the finest stainless steel material. The blades utilise Cromova 18 stainless steel, ice tempered and hardened to Rockwell C56° - 58° which holds a razor sharp edge longer than any other steel and resists rust, stains and corrosion.

Global® 3-Piece Knife Set
The concept behind the Global knife was to bring together Italian design, German durability, and Japanese precision—without compromising any of these elements. The result is a knife constructed from a single piece of steel, with a unique convex edge and unsurpassed performance.

Made in Japan.

Wüsthof® Classic 2-Piece Asian Set
For nearly 200 years, Wüsthof has produced professional-quality cutlery of extraordinary strength, balance and comfort. Beautifully designed knives feature handcrafted, high-carbon stainless steel blades that keep a lasting, razor-sharp edge and resist rust and stains. Founded in Solingen, Germany, in 1814, Wüsthof is in its seventh generation of family ownership.

Made in Germany.

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...or Hand Made Knives



One of the kind made exclusively to the owner spec - Cuchillos Duc - Cuchillos Artesanales - Made in Argentina

Cocina
 

TomAtAlki

Registered
I have 3 Globel knives and love them of course my husband sharpens them.

From "the husband": Global knives need a very steep edge. Mostly I touch them up with a ceramic iron and they do well.
 

desertrose

Registered
I have a very nice Böker knife that was quite a bargain at the Rural. If you're looking for something handmade I can recommend someone in San Isidro.
 

Napoleon

Registered
desertrose said:
I have a very nice Böker knife that was quite a bargain at the Rural. If you're looking for something handmade I can recommend someone in San Isidro.
Was this an ANNUAL show?

Or are they a staple at some section of the Rural that I don't know about?

In general, I'm pretty skeptical about a domestically produced knife, because I'm not a gaucho and I won't need to gut an animal and then eat its cooked flesh an hour or two later and use the same knife for both activities.

I want something that I can grab in the kitchen and slice away with minimal effort. Something that makes think "What am I going to slice, dice, and chop today?"

PS- I doesn't have to fit in a sheath and then slipped in my belt. It's just for the kitchen.
 
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