Expat from Norway

#1
I'm a 28 year old computer, Linux hacker, guy, expat (don't like that word) from Norway. Moving to BA to see if it's possible to make a living over the Internet.Staying in Almagre currently, it's nice, central and cheap. This forum seams like a good place to learn more about the current culture, what's going on in BA and good tips. Language is something that I'm working on so this site is helpful :) -s-
 
#2
I'm a 25 yr old programmer, I've been making most of my money via the internet--best way to live/travel. If you'd ever care to meet up with my friends and I for a few beers, email me: boufford at gmail dot com. -Mike
 
#4
Nikita_C:
Thanks :) I think I've been an argentinian in another life, hehe
PocketProtector: mmmmm, beer :) I will contact you. fredrik at smartypants.no is my msn address -f-
 

nikad

Registered
#6
"Smartypants" said:
I'm a 28 year old computer, Linux hacker, guy, expat (don't like that word) from Norway. Moving to BA to see if it's possible to make a living over the Internet.Staying in Almagre currently, it's nice, central and cheap. This forum seams like a good place to learn more about the current culture, what's going on in BA and good tips. Language is something that I'm working on so this site is helpful :) -s-
A hacker? Is the police looking for you?
 
#7
"nikad" said:
A hacker? Is the police looking for you?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hacker I think you've seen to much Hollywood movies or watched some scary tabloid news ;)A "hacker" is a positive word... :) A small crash course
Overview
At least three major hacker subcultures, characterized by their
largely distinct historical development, use the term 'Hacker' in their
jargon for self-identification.[2]
They are centered around different, but partially overlapping aspects
of computers and have conflicting ideas about who may legitimately be
called a hacker (see hacker definition controversy).
In computer security, a hacker is someone who focuses on security
mechanisms. In common use, which was popularized by the mass media,
that refers to someone who illegally breaks into computer and network
systems. That is, the media portrays the 'hacker' as a villain.
Nevertheless, parts of the subculture see their aim in correcting
security problems and use the word in a positive sense. They operate
under a code of the Hacker Ethic,
in which it's acknowledged that breaking into other people's computers
is bad, but that discovering and exploiting security mechanisms and
breaking into computers is nevertheless an interesting aspect that can
be done in an ethical and legal way.
This use is contrasted by the different understanding of the word as
a person who follows a spirit of playful cleverness and loves
programming. It is found in an originally academic movement unrelated
to computer security and most visibly associated with free software and open source. It also has a hacker ethic,
based on the idea that writing software and sharing the result is a
good idea, but only on a voluntary basis, and that information should
be free, but that it's not up to the hacker to make it free by breaking
into private computer systems. Academic hackers disassociate from the
mass media's pejorative use of the word 'hacker' referring to computer
security, and usually prefer the term 'cracker' for that meaning. In a
third meaning, the term refers to computer hobbyists who push the
limits of their software or hardware.
 

nikad

Registered
#8
Sorry 4 the misunderstanding, yet people do not usually present themselves as hackers, it just has a negative connotation but it may be just me ;)
 
#9
It certainly isn't just you, "nikad", who accord a negative meaning to "hacker". Indeed, the first of the definitions given (all taken from Wikipedia, it should be noted) clearly is pejorative -- that of a cyber trespasser, at the least -- even if its bearers wish to think it otherwise (and, of course, many criminals wish to think themselves honest or even heroic, regardless of their crimes).
The OP might consider calling himself something other than a "hacker" when speaking or posting in the broader society, even if he might continue to use the term in a smaller circle. The word is a negative one in the ears of native speakers of English.