Greetings, Community!

Coco

Registered
Hello everyone. I'm new to Buenos Aires (two weeks) and have recently decided to move here. I'm looking into the rentista visa program, and would be grateful to anyone who's already gone through the process and willing to share their experience.

Likewise, I'm searching for a one-bedroom flat to lease on a renewable three-month term. My ideal rent is $400 to $600 USD per month in either Palermo or Recoleta. Again, I'd appreciate your feedback and collective experience, especially your suggestions and introductions to building / condo owners.

I want to start building a network here, and would like to organize a meet up for any that would like to attend! I'm thinking next Tuesday after 6pm at Tortoni's.

Please let me know if you'd like to come. Thanks everyone! :)
 

steveinbsas

Registered
Coco said:
Hello everyone. I'm new to Buenos Aires (two weeks) and have recently decided to move here. I'm looking into the rentista visa program, and would be grateful to anyone who's already gone through the process and willing to share their experience.

Likewise, I'm searching for a one-bedroom flat to lease on a renewable three-month term. My ideal rent is $400 to $600 USD per month in either Palermo or Recoleta. Again, I'd appreciate your feedback and collective experience, especially your suggestions and introductions to building / condo owners.

I want to start building a network here, and would like to organize a meet up for any that would like to attend! I'm thinking next Tuesday after 6pm at Tortoni's.

Please let me know if you'd like to come. Thanks everyone! :)
You have only been here two weeks and you've decided to move here?

If you do find a one bedroom (short term/furnished) rental in Palermo or Recoleta in you targeted price range, then perhaps you should move here. At your target price range you would have to share.

Otherwise I suggest you do a lot more research...(including my posts about the visa rentista).

Also read dozens (if not hundreds) of (archived) posts by newcomers who also decided to move her with no idea of what it's really like to live here and deal with all of the negatives.

I had a visa rentista for three years and I "did it myself" (with the help of friends and family in the USA sending documents and a girlfriend here who went to migraciones with me). With the help of a lawyer it can be a bit easier, but of course you will also have yo pay at least $1000.

PS: I doubt that few expats would want to meet at Cafe Tortoni.

(It's a bit like meeting someone in Paris at the Moulin Rouge.)

If you want to meet for a coffee in Belgrano I would be happy to tell you all I know about the visa rentista!
 

citygirl

Registered
Steve - play nice ;) Coco - as Steve has pointed out, finding a 1 BR, short-term apt in that price range will be next to impossible, especially in the areas you mentioned. Price ranges for a basic 1B in those areas will probably be closer to 800 USD and up. There are lots of helpful threads on here about the rentista visa and well worth looking at. You will probably find it easier to apply for the visa from your home country (although you can do it from here).
 

cabrera

Registered
Coco said:
Hello everyone. I'm new to Buenos Aires (two weeks) and have recently decided to move here. I'm looking into the rentista visa program, and would be grateful to anyone who's already gone through the process and willing to share their experience.

Likewise, I'm searching for a one-bedroom flat to lease on a renewable three-month term. My ideal rent is $400 to $600 USD per month in either Palermo or Recoleta. Again, I'd appreciate your feedback and collective experience, especially your suggestions and introductions to building / condo owners.

I want to start building a network here, and would like to organize a meet up for any that would like to attend! I'm thinking next Tuesday after 6pm at Tortoni's.

Please let me know if you'd like to come. Thanks everyone! :)

Yes and you are ready to change Buenos Aires as well . US 400 to US 600 with all modern conveniences in the areas you mention are not feasible not even for argentinians who pay much more for a furnished apartment in those neighbourhoods. Prices are rising and this year inflation is 30 percent predicted meaning that we will be dearer than Paris soon .
 

philamote

Registered
Hi Coco,

In the same boat as you--got here two weeks ago and I'm still making sense of this city. I'm more than eager to network, but I'm not that well acquainted with meeting places yet. Will keep you posted about next week though.

I managed to find a spacious room in a three bedroom Palermo apt in the $400 range within the first few days of my arrival. My intermediate knowledge of Spanish helped me, I guess, as well as my willingness to share living quarters with two Argentine students. A single-room apt is a different matter obviously.

Good luck with your search.

Chris
 

steveinbsas

Registered
philamote said:
I managed to find a spacious room in a three bedroom Palermo apt in the $400 range within the first few days of my arrival. My intermediate knowledge of Spanish helped me, I guess, as well as my willingness to share living quarters with two Argentine students. A single-room apt is a different matter obviously.
Was this apartment leased (unfurnished) for two years in the name of one of the Argentines? Did you actually "find" and lease the apartment or simply answer an ad for an apartment share?
 

philamote

Registered
steveinbsas said:
Was this apartment leased (unfurnished) for two years in the name of one of the Argentines? Did you actually "find" and lease the apartment or simply answer an ad for an apartment share?
Well, I "found" the room through an ad, yes. Obviously it is a temporary (3-6 month) living situation as I don't plan on finding a garantia or a work visa anytime soon.

I'm not sure yet whether I've technically "moved" here or am just visiting long-term, but I'm aiming for the former. Just thought I'd pass along my experience in getting a room that's within my budget.
 

Coco

Registered
Thanks for the candid replies, everyone! As you can see, I'm green indeed, but also very eager to get acquainted with the city and its culture.

Steve, meeting for coffee in Belgrano would be wonderful! Please PM me and let me know when you're free. Sorry to have suggested such a poor venue for meeting up. Perhaps someone could suggest an alternative?

I appreciate the reality-check regarding rent in those neighborhoods. I can easily adjust my budget, and wanted to start low only to avoid "being taken." My tastes are a bit particular (i.e. washer and dryer in-building if not in-unit is a must), so would a budget of $800 to $1,000 be more reasonable, or should I bump that to $1,200?

Speaking of inflation, has the purchasing power incentive really begun to wane since you all arrived? Besides learning Spanish (immersion is my chief motivation for moving), the biggest draws for me are the favorable exchange rate and the standard of living that this affords. Am I naive in thinking that this advantage will continue more-or-less intact over the next five years?

I have a small technology consulting practice in the States, and plan on continuing that work remotely. Nevertheless, I might also be interested in opening a small business here, so I'm eager to learn more about the political / regulatory cultures. Has anyone here opened one already?

In any event, thanks again for all of your help! I'm so glad I found you all, and look forward to getting to know you.

Stay well everyone :)
 

ElQueso

Registered
The problem with the exchange rate is that it hasn't kept up with inflation here because the dollar deflated as teh peso was deflating. Some things have risen at least 100% in the last couple of years, some things less. The exchange rate, when I moved here late in 2006, was just about pegged at 3 to 1 to the dollar. It fluctuated a few cents up and down, but was pretty close to that all the time.

In 2007 I lived in temporary apartments, anywhere from one month to three months at a time. I actually moved 9 times that year. The most I ever paid for a temporary apartment was $850 dollars a month for a two bedroom, 65 square meter apartment near Callao and Corrientes. I thought that was really high at the time, for a temporary apartment.

The apartment that I moved into at the beginning of 2008 was a two bedroom apartment in Recoleta, on Juncal between Riobamba and Junin. It was a two year lease, but I sublet from an acquaintance who had paid the full 2 year lease in advance in lieu of having a garantia. After a year he had to go back to the US and I took over paying his lease - moved in and bought all of his stuff from him.

His rent was $750 dollars a month. The apartment was 100 square meters and had a dependencia which I used for my (rather cramped, admittedly) office.

At the end of the lease in September 2008, the owner told me that he was going to raise the rent to $1200 dollars, because that was what property was going for in that area. I think he was a bit high on the price, but maybe $1000 dollars would have been reasonable given the prices at the time. I think he really wanted to sell the property and scared me off on purpose.

Going from $750 in 2006 to $1000 in 2008 would be a 33% increase. The dollar was still 3-1 at that point. But of course, the owner still wanted the rent paid in dollars, not pesos, which is not common really when talking about rental prices.

If you can find a 2 year lease without a guarantee (not impossible - I have three different friends who have managed to do so, but it takes a lot of work and hussling), you will find that they have inflation built into your contract. Depending on the owner, the location, etc, there is a 15% to 20% increase in rent built into the contact in the second year's price. The agents I talk to about renting have all told me that everyone figures the inflation rate itself has been higher than the 20% maximum on the rent.

I think rent prices have more or less stabilized for now though. I don't know about property prices for buying - I don't intend to lock any sizeable portion of money into Argentina, personally. But rent-wise - my wife and I are looking to return to the city and have been looking at apartments.

We are still finding decent deals on three bedroom apartments, for example. I looked at one yesterday that was 160 square meters with three bedrooms and a dependencia in Nuñez, on the 10th floor of a building right on Libertador across from the navy mechanics' school. The view was breath-taking. Across the other side of Libertador, I could see nothing but trees and a few small buildings all the way to the river, and on a clear day I have little doubt one could actually see Uruguay. In front and a little to the right I could clearly see the River Stadium. It was truly a beautiful view.

$4000 pesos. Just a little over $1000 dollars right now. Not bad at all. Of course, with a built-in 20% increase in the second year...

But inflation-wise, I think food and of course imported products have been the biggest increases. Everyday things. I don't know how much longer the economy can stand this, and something has to give because I know the lower income people out here where I live are all suffering tremendously from rises of 50% to 100% in food stuff that they buy regularly.

If you are coming here and don't see the prices as bad, you are probably going to be okay I think. I just can't see things going much worse unless there is some kind of financial collapse like 2002, which of course would make the dollar stronger in relation to the peso unless the States collapses too.

But right now, if you find prices good, you shouldn't see too much more of a rise I think, at least not to the scale of what we've seen over the last two years.

I'm a software developer, though, not an economist, so I could be completely wrong :)
 
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