HALF PRICED AIRLINE TICKETS FOR EXPATS!!

DA

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Very good information, Thanks, however it does not seem like the regular prices have been subsidized, it appears that the regular prices have been doubled for non residents, if you compare the distance of a flight, you will find that in most other parts of the world the price of a similar airline ticket is about half of what a non resident fare is, and in Argentina fuel and labor is much cheaper, I think the AIRLINES are ripping off the Argentine government, non residents and residents. How can it cost almost the same to fly from Caracas to Buenos Aires as Mendoza to Buenos Aires????
 

Matty

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hehehe...excuse me...but I had a good chuckle on that last post...were you trying to use and solicit logic or reason for all these happenings? Good luck with that...Welcome to Argentina, btw!
Tip: Have you looked into driving to these places? Some friends just left from here and they drove around Argentina for 7 weeks.
 
Ramon-Let me put it a different way....What if the U.S. did the SAME thing with airline pricing and Foreigners traveling in the U.S. paid double fare? Argentines would be OUTRAGED. How dare they?As for my "hatred" as you say....in a nutshell...I came here voluntarily and with a positive attitude. I suppose after five years my experiences have not been as "chirpy and upbeat" as others. For the record, I have said it before....THERE ARE ARGENTINES WHO ARE WONDERFUL PEOPLE. Unfortunately the others are what you discuss. Should I go on and on about how DIVINO everyone and everything is when its not? Media (Argentine and American) paints this rosy picture of everything when reality is quite different. For what its worth, several people have actually sent me private notes on here saying how they are glad someone speaks the truth and says it like it is. I have always done that throughout my life, good or bad and will not change. That is one of my qualities that I personally like. I wish more people would actually say what they are thinking instead of saying nothing. As someone on here said, it is amazing the ends that some people go to defend Argentines. Now I cannot be the ONLY person with bad experiences. Luckily mine have been financially minimal and more of a bothersome nature. Brief example: If an Argentine walks into an Art gallery and is quoted one price for a painting then I walk in and am quoted a completely different price...of course much higher? Whats with that? All I look for is fairness, honesty and common decency. I really don't think thats too much to ask for.Enjoy the wonderful weekend. The weather is great and ArteBs As is taking place at La Rural this weekend.
 

Matty

Registered
What is "soylent Green"? and "is" people? Of what? What does that mean?
Can someone please explain? Is it "taken away" as in a) a straight jacket or b) disappear without a trace (hence a threat to rmartin's safety)? That is spooky!
 

steveinbsas

Registered
Relax, Matty, It's only a movie. Use google search and you will learn more. Actually, though "soylent green is people" is the best known line from the film, "going home" (not "taken away") is the truly "spooky" if not somewhat ironic expression (as it might apply to disgruntled expats) in this 1973 sci-fi flick.

"Going home" is government assisted (subsidized) suicide.
 

SamBsAs

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First of all the mention that the poor in Argentina do not fly, is not unique to Argentina. The poor in the USA cannot afford to fly either, nor can they in most countries whether the government subsidizes the domestic airlines or not. As for the recent increases in airfares that is not unique to Argentina either. With oil at $130 airlines the world over have been rapidly increasing airfares. In the US right now the fuel surcharges can be as much or more than the ticket price. I think it fair to say that the increases in domestic Argentine airfares is a result of the price of oil doubling in the last the 6 months not some plan by the central government to rip off tourists.
 

steveinbsas

Registered
"SamBsAs" said:
First of all the mention that the poor in Argentina do not fly, is not unique to Argentina. The poor in the USA cannot afford to fly either, nor can they in most countries whether the government subsidizes the domestic airlines or not. As for the recent increases in airfares that is not unique to Argentina either. With oil at $130 airlines the world over have been rapidly increasing airfares. In the US right now the fuel surcharges can be as much or more than the ticket price. I think it fair to say that the increases in domestic Argentine airfares is a result of the price of oil doubling in the last the 6 months not some plan by the central government to rip off tourists.
The "poor" (as defined by the US government..$24,000 gross annual household income )
in the USA are "rich" compare to the "poor" in the rest of the world,
and many do fly, though not all that often. They also own cars and have
cellphones and TV's. I should know, I'm one of them (but without a car or
cellphone, and half the income). Many of us also have relatives who occasionally "gift" an airline ticket so we can visit them. (This is also common for "poor" Mexicans with relatives working in the US. I lived in a small village in Mexico for five years (2001-2006) and know this for a fact.)

Argentina airlines have
been charging foreigners more for domestic flights than residents for
some time. This was true two years ago when I checked out flights to
Bariloche. It has nothing to do with recent increases in fuel prices.

The
price of my RT ticket (purchased here) from BA to San Francisco on
American Airlines in March was $679 USD. There was $349 UDS in
Argentine taxes on top of that. The Argentine government probably collected
more net revenue than the airline. I would consider that a "rip-off" if there
ever was one.
 

SamBsAs

Registered
Maybe you should read my initial post a bit more closely...in that I clearly stated that the reason for the price difference for residents and foreigners is that the Argentine government subsidizes the airlines to keep the ticket costs down for residents and to make sure smaller towns are served by the airlines. Is this clear for you? The point about the recent increases in the airfares was about the price of oil doubling in the past 6 months.
So you think the Argentine government should subsidize your airfares too? All you have to do is become a resident and get your DNI and then you can pay the resident rate as well.SuerteSam
 

steveinbsas

Registered
"SamBsAs" said:
Maybe you should read my initial post a bit more closely...in that I clearly stated that the reason for the price difference for residents and foreigners is that the Argentine government subsidizes the airlines to keep the ticket costs down for residents and to make sure smaller towns are served by the airlines. Is this clear for you? The point about the recent increases in the airfares was about the price of oil doubling in the past 6 months.
So you think the Argentine government should subsidize your airfares too? All you have to do is become a resident and get your DNI and then you can pay the resident rate as well.
Suerte Sam
If you read my posts in this thread more closely you might be less condescending and see that I was indeed responding to your assertion that the Argentine government subsidizes the domestic airlines. I understand the "reason" but I simply don't agree with this practice (if it exists), and I clearly explained why. It has nothing to do with me personally. I did not state or imply that I "think" the Argentine government should "subsidize" my airfares, too.

I do agree with you "that the increases in domestic Argentine
airfares is a result of the price of oil doubling in the last the 6
months not some plan by the central government to rip off tourists", but, as I wrote in a previous post, "the Argentina airlines have been charging foreigners more for domestic flights than residents for

some time" and THAT "has nothing to do with recent increases in fuel prices." Charging nonresidents twice as much as residents reduces the number of foreigners who are willing to fly domestically, especially, as DA noted, "if you compare the distance of a flight, you will find that in most
other parts of the world the price of a similar airline ticket is about
half of what a non resident fare is, and in Argentina fuel and labor is
much cheaper." This was the case for some of my friends from France who recently canceled their entire trip to Argentina when they calculated the cost of the domestic flights. Calling the jacked up prices foreigners are asked to pay the "market price" is inaccurate, to say the least, and it supports the well established image of Argentina as a land of rip-offs.

And, for your information, Sam, I already have a DNI.
 
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