How americans see the outside world

#2
Question: How many Americans does it take to change a lightbulb?
Answer:Five, one to hold the bulb and four to turn the chair*. *Assuming that an officechair is not readily available.
 
#4
Everyone country has a home grown crop of morons. If you talk to enough people you will run into them. I have seen plenty of them here in Buenos Aires including one girl who asked me "What language to they speak in the US" (no joke). It is funny to me how people from other countries (Europeans especially) like to prop themselves up as pillars of learning and culture. I used to work on a cruiseship and came into contact with a lot of Brits (working in the casino and the shows in the main lounge for the most part). If only I had recorded some of the idiotic nonsense that would come out of their mouths during our weekly poker sessions.
 
#5
Argentines are some of the most provincial, closed minded people ive ever met. not to mention the dirtiest. they just wallow in dirt, streets filled with swirling clouds of pollution, deafening street noise from the unregulated, uncontrolled vehicles. And they just dont get it.
dont get me started on the argies!
 
#6
Well, the people may be dirty (by littering), but in the states, I have NEVER seen any one clean the stoop of their business. Yet at 8 AM in BA it is difficult to find a dry sidewalk. I am not underestimating the pollution by any means.
Jessica
 

Marc

Active Member
#7

"JG" said:
Argentines are some of the most provincial, closed minded people ive ever met. not to mention the dirtiest. they just wallow in dirt, streets filled with swirling clouds of pollution, deafening street noise from the unregulated, uncontrolled vehicles. And they just dont get it.
dont get me started on the argies!
That's a rather sweeping statement JG. I agree entirely about the dirty streets; it's one of the messiest cities I've ever seen, not to mention the pollution and the state of the vehicles, which at times is mind boggling...and the villas miserias,beggars and street hawkers and so on and so on. But then, isn't that part of the rich tapestry of life in Argentina? We may not like a lot of it and as "guests" in this country we may not be able to change the way it is. But........
As for Argentines being "provincial" and "closed minded", there is a certain amount of truth in what you say. However, I believe they have an inner strength and resiliance that I have never seen before. Of course it could also be described as resignation and total apathy towards their political leaders, elected or otherwise. God knows, they've had enough to endure over the last 30 to 50 years and so to some extent one can understand that attitude. They almost bleed cynisism in that respect. But who can blame them?
I'm British and proud of that fact. Also I believe most Brits know where Uganda is and also that France is not in Australia. Neither is Korea. But then, I also believe most educated Argentines, at least the ones I've met, know where France or Italy are located. They're a mixed bunch the Argentines, and for me that IS the attraction.I also think they are extremely well mannered and polite. Particularly the younger generation, I hasten to add. Yes the younger generation. They respect their elders in a way you no longer see in England, which to me personally, is very disappointing. Now, hoards of Brits are leaving the UK, because, in their words "it's gone to the dogs." But I digress. In my experience, Americans have a far more blinkered view of the world than Argentines. A vast majority of Americans don't even have a passport...fact. I'm not running down the United States, but I do believe they should open their eyes a little more to the outside world. Example: "Gee, so you're English! What part of London are you from?" Get my drift? A similar thing happened to me at Rosie's party. We bumped into an American lady moaning about the USA. She then asked me the usual...What part of London are you from?
I replied saying that in fact I was not from London, but somewhere else. She replied "gees, I hate Britain, just hate it."
Have you ever been there? I asked. NO was the reply. QED.
The original title of this thread was How Americans see the world. maybe it should be... How the Americans DON'T see the world.
Argentines DO see the world. It just happens that they are a long way away from the rest of it and in some ways, maybe, they like it like that.
 
#8
Argentines see the world but it is as if they see it through some kind of opaque lense. People in Buenos Aires have no excuse for this because in terms of technology and infrastructure they ARE well connected to the rest of the world. People here are always telling you how they have been to Europe and traveled all around the world and have relatives living here and there but they don't seem to learn anything. Everyone has so much information and knowledge about the local economy but they never solve their economic problems as a nation and are now sowing the seeds for another financial collapse. You even hear people complaining about how much financial trouble their household is in or how they can't find work and then in the next breath they are telling you that they are taking their entire family to Punta the next week. Does having a lot of information in your mind really make you intelligent if you can't put it together to come up with some creative solutions to your problems? America's strength is the fact that we have people from all over the world living in the states who think of themselves as American. If the leadership ever embraces that as a strength there is no other country anywhere in the world that would be able to compete with America.