Immigration an election issue

#2
It's probably not an issue because immigrants from Bolivia, Paraguay and Peru are needed for low level, low paying work and there is no reason to upset the system.
 
#3
Most of those people work in the black market, live in villa´s, bring diseases to Argentina, are responsible for part of the crime and are reponsible for most of the drugs that enter in the country.
But maybe you can explain to me what Argentina gains with illegal immigration?
 
#4
I think the answer is cheap labor. One could argue the same thing for the US. There are some convincing studies that show that immigrants from Mexico and central America cost the US government more in social services than they contribute in labor nevertheless Bush has been pushingh hard to legalize millions of illegal people. I don't think that politicians here are thinking of long term consequences any more than Bush is.
 
#5
"sergio" said:
I think the answer is cheap labor. One could argue the same thing for the US. There are some convincing studies that show that immigrants from Mexico and central America cost the US government more in social services than they contribute in labor nevertheless Bush has been pushingh hard to legalize millions of illegal people. I don't think that politicians here are thinking of long term consequences any more than Bush is.
Bush is trying atleast to find a sollution. The same system should work for Argentina as well.
But it does not make sense to talk for example villa´s, black market, crime if your borders are wide open.
I do think there should be some kind of sollution for the immigrants that are in Argentina now(patria grande is not an answer) but that should not include future immigrants
I dont know if you have noticed that there are ever more black people in the streets of BA. Some might come from other American countries(US, Carribean, Brazil, Colombia for example) but the majority is from Africa. And they only come to Argentina because they can go nowhere else. The educated ones stay or go to the western world.


 

ghost

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#6
"Granadaiscool" said:
I think the answer is cheap labor. One could argue the same thing for the US. There are some convincing studies that show that immigrants from Mexico and central America cost the US government more in social services than they contribute in labor nevertheless Bush has been pushingh hard to legalize millions of illegal people. I don't think that politicians here are thinking of long term consequences any more than Bush is.
Bush is trying atleast to find a sollution. The same system should work for Argentina as well.
But it does not make sense to talk for example villa´s, black market, crime if your borders are wide open.
I do think there should be some kind of sollution for the immigrants that are in Argentina now(patria grande is not an answer) but that should not include future immigrants
I dont know if you have noticed that there are ever more black people in the streets of BA. Some might come from other American countries(US, Carribean, Brazil, Colombia for example) but the majority is from Africa. And they only come to Argentina because they can go nowhere else. The educated ones stay or go to the western world.
Ohhhhhh....get ready. This is going to start a firestorm.
 
#8
just thought I would let you know that bush was trying to pass the immigration bill because there were alot of other hidden things wrapped inside the immigration bill that would allow him to do things he wanted to do without the public knowing. Don't be fooled that there is any country in the world that doesnt have problems or corrupt systems, they all do and its a fact of life. In argentina the corruption is just more obvious then in the other countries.
 
#9
"ghost" said:
Bush is trying atleast to find a solution. The same system should work for Argentina as well.
What makes you think that? The US economy -- what remains of it -- is increasingly based on a ready supply of unskilled labor. This is evident both in big cities such as NYC and LA and in the agricultural hinterland. Big capital -- and by implication their proxy Bush -- has absolutely no interest in staunching the flow of undocumented workers. US taxpayers subsidise this as such workers cost more in services than they pay out, and they have a dampening effect on US wages and work conditions generally.