Is the DNI for naturalized citizens different?

Kula

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Yeah, and also in general when you apply to become a national of a country (at least in the EU as far as I know, but every country has their own process), you have to present both your parents' birth certificates. They can then check if you're argentino de origen or not.

The term "de origen" doesn`t exist outside of Spain so its no possible to proove it for most of countries, as such term will be not written in no document- nobody fits?)

BTW Spain doesnt ask for parents` birth certificate, only certificate of the applicant him/herself.
 

dsp27

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A friend of mine sent an email to the juzgado to ask if it's possible to correct a little detail on his carta de ciudadanía and the answer was as follows with capital letters: "LAS CARTAS DE CIUDADANÍA NO PUEDEN SER MODIFICADAS". So I think that could be an accurate answer to your question
They had made a mistake on mine and simply schlepped some correction fluid on it it looks horrible haha. Frankly no one will ever look at this piece of pink paper so don't worry. If it means so much to have it fixed it can be done. But you'd have to get a new carta de ciudadania from the Juzgado.
 

Saninmdz

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@dsp27 as long as the first and last names are not misspelled, who cares about where the person was born 😁

Your correction was before or after you signed it?
 

dsp27

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@dsp27 as long as the first and last names are not misspelled, who cares about where the person was born 😁

Your correction was before or after you signed it?
Before, they had written the country under town and had changed it before I even entered the despacho. Never saw the judge it was all donde by the secretario. Granted he did a good job fixing it, doesn’t look too bad. And he has a nice handwritingX:)
 
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