Mercosur Travel, Dni Or Passport?

Churchill

Newcomer
I have residency here and will be travelling to Santiago in a few weeks. From what I have been reading Chile is super cheap in comparison with Bs As and so wanted to take the opportunity to get a new phone and maybe laptop. From what I have read on a few Argie forums/blogs customs at EZE seem hot on checking the bags of returning Argies and making sure they havent brought back too much and declared too little. Therefore, I thought I may as well travel with my UK passport instead of just my DNI and see if I get given less of a once over. Any one any recent experiences?
 

r2d2

Registered
I would not risk generating problems with migration by using the wrong document/entering as a tourist even though you are a resident. Just leave your current phone at home and throw away the box, manuals etc. from the new phone - so it looks like it is your regular phone. Same with the laptop. Make it look a little used.

And true: prices in Santiago are a lot better than in Argentina. For phones In Santiago check mercadolibre.cl first.The department stores/malls often do not have the best prices. A lot of the vendors with "MercadoLider" status operate stores or offices in Providencia, downtown etc.

Always double check that the phones are unlocked internationally. Also make sure the phones have the 4G bands used in Argentina: http://nacho.com.ar/2015/02/bandas-3g-y-4g-en-argentina/ Chile uses a different 4G band than Argentina.
 

r2d2

Registered
I just saw the other thread with the same question. It is not true that you need you passport in order to travel to Chile. I have traveled there many times by car, bus and airplane with just my DNI. I never take my passport with me when going there.
 

Noesdeayer

Registered
r2d2:
I just checked the U.S. Dep't of State website for the requirements for U.S. citizens entering Chle .The 1st requirement listed is a passport valid for the length of stay.
Maybe that has changed but I would think such a change would be already listed on that website.
Then again the requirement could be different for other nationals Argentine,for example.
One can always do as they wish.However,I will continue to use my DNI and U,S, passport as always.
 

scotttswan

Registered
I had my passport stolen and was due to travel to Chile in the next few weeks, As a resident i too wondered if i was able to travel to Chile on only my DNI like my wife can, She's a citizen of Argentina.

Over the phone the Chileans wouldn't give me an answer and so i went to the Chilean embassy who told me i could not travel only on my DNI and required a passport as i was only a resident rather than a citizen.

I got my passport very quickly from the UK and managed to travel no problems.
 

ElQueso

Registered
People who are foreign residents of Argentina (and other Mercosur countries) are not citizens, and therefore are not member citizens of the Mercosur (who are legally allowed to pass on their national identification card, without passports), and therefore are subject to the same requirements when entering a country where they are non-resident as if they had no residency; i.e. being a resident in Argentina does not make one a resident in all Mercosur countries, with attendant privileges.

Argentine foreign residents who have done so have been lucky in that the immigration officials at whichever border crossing either allow it out of lax border controls or ignorance of the difference between a regular DNI and a resident's DNI, or simply don't look to see the difference, or a combination of the above.

Much like perma-tourists who have no residency status here in Argentina, at some point someone attempting this would be denied entry on a DNI alone and personally, I would sure take my passport with me to ensure that I was not turned away at the border with the only possibility being a trip back to where I live in Argentina. Or paying a bribe to get across, with all its attendant risks.

As far as re-entering Argentina with just your passport - your passport is linked to your residency/DNI and they will know you are a resident when you enter with just your passport. Whether they ask you for your DNI is another thing, which I don't know, but they know you are resident here.
 

r2d2

Registered
Just not true. Before my first trip with residence and DNI I had asked Chilean PDI officials and they told me that I am supposed to present my DNI not my passport. They should know. Chilean PDI officials are well trained and know their business (better than their Argentinian counterparts). And as I had mentioned before: I have crossed the border between Argentina and Chile many times with my DNI. The border crossing I mostly go through has anything but "lax border controls". Especially the Chileans are usually very strict there with their controls resulting in long lines at the border.

The OP had mentioned a UK/EU passport. Things might be (or have been) different for passport holders of countries where the reciprocity fee is (was) required or for those nationals requiring a visa for Chile. They might want to see the passport then because your visa or fee payment is stamped into it ...


Also see http://www.migracion...xP.php?doc_pais

"Ingreso y Egreso al País"
- Section: EXTRANJEROS NACIONALES DE PAÍSES NO MERCOSUR
- Sub-Section: RADICADOS CON DESTINO A PAÍSES MERCOSUR

"Residentes Permanentes o Temporarios en la República Argentina:
[font=Droid Serif']Deberán presentar:[/font]
[font=Droid Serif']• Pasaporte de su Nacionalidad Vigente y constancia de Residencia en término, o [/font]
[font=Droid Serif']• Documento Nacional de Identidad expedido por el Registro Nacional de las Personas valido y vigente[/font][font=Droid Serif']"[/font]


So just your passport is in reality not enough for a temp or permanent resident. Either passport + "constancia de residencia"- or - just your DNI is required.


Edit: Do not ever try to bribe Chilean police.
 

Bajo_cero2

Registered
Do not use your credit cards at the Santiago airport. They duplicated mines. When they call me from the fraud deppartment they told me that it is normal at that airport.
 
Top