Moving to BA in September!!!!

shighland

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Hello all!

My name is Suzanne. I currently live in Florida, but am graduating with my bachelors degree in Creative Writing in two months and plan to move to Argentina in September. I love South America and have heard many amazing things about Buenos Aires, and I figured, if you can't randomly move someplace after you graduate, when can you?

By the time I move, I will also be TEFL certified. My main concern is finding a job when I get to BA. Do any of you know anything about finding a job teaching English? I've heard good and bad things, and I'm not sure what to expect or how difficult it will be. But I'm dedicated and passionate!

Thanks!
 

steveinbsas

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shighland said:
I figured, if you can't randomly move someplace after you graduate, when can you?

Based on my own experience, when you're 25, 40, 50, 55, or 60. :D

There's no law that says getting older means staying in one place any longer than you want to be there.

Sometimes economic reasons can delay a desired move. I would have moved to Utah the same year I graduated from college and bought property on Main Street in Park City (1973), but I had to grow and sell my business in Illinois before I could make the move in '75.

I also had to stay in Sayulita, Mexico for almost five years while I waited for someone to buy my house.

Then I made a very spontaneous decision to come to BA.

After four years in BA I made the move to the Costa Atlantica and I have no plans to move again, well at least not yet.

I think BA will be a great place for you to start your own great adventure but I must admit I did not come to BA to teach English.

There are a number of threads on that subject. You can find them using the search feature.
 

shighland

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@steveinbsas - You're so right! It's always good to hear that someone out there sees the world as limitless. I just figure, to reword myself, that now is as good a time as any! But your story is inspiring, thanks for sharing.

@lee - Thanks! It's good to know that there's a community out there of people like me who did the same thing.

Any suggestions on good websites to look for places to live? I've been browsing, but the idea of "temporary leases" is a little unsettling...how did any of you do it when you started?

Also, jobs! I'm so worried about finding a job! I'm a writer, so anything in that field would be incredible. I just have no idea where to start!
 

starlucia

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shighland said:
Hello all!

My name is Suzanne. I currently live in Florida, but am graduating with my bachelors degree in Creative Writing in two months and plan to move to Argentina in September. I love South America and have heard many amazing things about Buenos Aires, and I figured, if you can't randomly move someplace after you graduate, when can you?

By the time I move, I will also be TEFL certified. My main concern is finding a job when I get to BA. Do any of you know anything about finding a job teaching English? I've heard good and bad things, and I'm not sure what to expect or how difficult it will be. But I'm dedicated and passionate!

Thanks!

There's always teaching work available, but it's badly-paid and often unstable. There's also a lot of travel and planning time involved, which you won't be paid for. The upside is the students: most of mine were warm, interesting people with whom I had great conversations. As long as you have savings or parents to help with rent, and you enjoy the work, teaching is a nice way to offset daily expenses. But trying to get by on teaching wages alone would be kind of miserable (to give you an idea: an hour of teaching is 30-45 pesos, while a cappuccino is 17, a movie ticket is 30, bottle of table wine 25, entree at a nice restaurant 60.)
 

shighland

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starlucia said:
There's always teaching work available, but it's badly-paid and often unstable. There's also a lot of travel and planning time involved, which you won't be paid for. The upside is the students: most of mine were warm, interesting people with whom I had great conversations. As long as you have savings or parents to help with rent, and you enjoy the work, teaching is a nice way to offset daily expenses. But trying to get by on teaching wages alone would be kind of miserable (to give you an idea: an hour of teaching is 30-45 pesos, while a cappuccino is 17, a movie ticket is 30, bottle of table wine 25, entree at a nice restaurant 60.)

How possible is it to get private teaching/tutoring jobs on the side?
 
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