Piquetera

#1
Every time I turn on the telly, I see a new piquetera or protest (well, the weather is warming up a bit...). I think to myself how tenuous the government's grasp on the reins of power must be with all these various protests going on (there was a really large one last Thursday organised by that bloke Blumberg). Anyway, it occurs to me that the expats residing here must be about the only group that hasn't organised its own protest. It's high time this was done. All that's needed is a few banners (with the slogan, "Foreign Residents of Buenos Aires") and a few drums (enough to create a discordant cacophony) and we're in business. The group will be protesting about ... dunno ... we can think of something, I'm sure.
 

malbec

Active Member
#2
The protest last Thursday wasn't organised by piqueteros. And it wasn't aimed at criticising the gov (at least not directly). They were just claiming justice.Piqueteros are the result of non-existing assistance to those who are unemployed. They become cheap "protest-workers" for those interested in starting a career as politician. Some money here, some money there, the promise of job/house/land and there you are!The official party (Peron's party) has a long tradition at controlling masses. If you think the gov's grasp on the reins of power is tenous...imagine how it would be if the President belonged to the opposition!
Argentina goes nowhere with the current official party... they know how to control masses but not how to guide the country out of the hole. The opposition can only dream of holding the power for a complete period. Sad but true.
 
#4
"bjrutledge" said:
So just out of curiosity, what exactly will you be protesting?
Not the foggiest. We have to concoct some imaginary grievance (though I daresay some real ones exist). We need banners, placards, and drums. And someone eloquent (in Castellano) to act as spokesperson. With this one protest we shall have established ourselves on the political map. Kirchner will quake with fear every time he hears the dread words, "Foreign Residents of Buenos Aires."
 
#5
We'll need a steel chain atleast 15 meters or 49 feet long, 22 padlocks and ten volunteers.I'll take it upon myself to supply half of the padlocks, others will have to bring the rest of the materials needed. We should not spend too much time trying to come up with issues to protest, what's important is that we get together and stand united protesting before it's too late or things get worse or something of the sort. The question that people need to ask themselfs now is are they going to just lay down and get walked all over or are they going to stand up for something and protest!
 
#6
"Elpanada" said:
We should not spend too much time trying to come up with issues to protest, what's important is that we get together and stand united protesting before it's too late or things get worse or something of the sort.
Couldn't agree with you more. This is Argentina: not an awfully cerebral country. The actual issue and the arguments to bolster one's point of view simply don't matter. Invent one on the spur of the moment. What matters is to create a goshawful din and block the traffic.
 
#7
"malbec" said:
They were just claiming justice.
So do such protests produce anything tangible at the end of the day? I viewed the Blumberg protest on TV sceptically, and soon switched to La Pantera Rosa.
Argentina goes nowhere with the current official party... they know how to control masses but not how to guide the country out of the hole. The opposition can only dream of holding the power for a complete period.
Indeed so. The ship of state drifts rudderless. Argentina's political class is composed of venal and incompetent people.