Queries re.Pensioners' Visas ('rentistas') for married couples

Sockhopper

Registered
My husband and I are considering retiring in Argentina. We've spent 13 months in BA since 2007 in temporary apartments. We're looking into the requirements of pensioners' (rentista) visas. I'd very much appreciate your help with any of my questions or concerns, below.

I've read on this forum that married couples have the option of being on the same visa. Is this true and what benefit would sharing one visa provide? I doubt that a visa shared between 2 adults would even be possible since a visa is issued dependent upon whether a sole adult applicant himself/herself qualifies for one and satisfies its conditions himself. But if I'm wrong, I'd appreciate knowing which spouse in a 'combined' visa is the holder of the visa and in whose name the visa appears. I see problems in traveling alone if there's only one visa for 2 adults. I wonder too how the "added" spouse would later obtain a DNI.

Also, if each spouse has his/her own visa, does each spouse have to prove he/she has the minimum continuing non-salary form of income (eg. pension) of $US720./month, or is this sum reduced for a couple living together? What happens if only one spouse has a good foreign pension but the other does not and yet each one must satisfy the income sum requirement?

Must both spouses be retired in order for both to obtain 'rentistas'? Ie, if one is not quite yet retired, is he/she required to apply for some other form of temporary visa (eg. a 'work'-type visa) with different qualifying conditions?

Does a 'rentista' prohibit its holder from making money/working in Argentina?

I'm also curious if there are any expat married couples in BA who have been caught by the change in the law of last May that now prohibits a pensioner rentista from ever obtaining a permanent visa. I'm concerned because I don't know what is involved in the process of renewing a rentista. I'm crossing my fingers that it doesn't involve essentially doing again everything you had to do and get to obtain the temporary visa in the first place. And, has anyone been unable to uncover the rationale for this prohibition on permanent residency applying only to or mainly to rentistas? I'm scratching my head over that one which is probably a good thing to learn how to do before moving to Argentina.
 

Dolly

Registered
Sorry I don't know the answer to many of your questions - but I do know - that you do not have to be retired to get a rentisats visa. Rentista visa is for any age that you can show you can bring $750 US (I may be a little wrong, but I think this is the amount) into the country each month. I am 41 years old, not retired, but currently pursuing a rentista visa through a lawyer here.
 

blackburn

Registered
My rentista visa required me to bring $2500 per month into the country.I had to apply to the Argentine consulate,in London,before coming here.Maybe different where you come from but the consulate will give you the info you require.They like the money transfered from the bank abroad to one here,not keen on using the atm for bringing the money here.You have to prove that the money is from a rental property and they don't make it easy.Accountants letters and tenancy agreements etc and they like everything apostiled,stamped with official bodies.When you apply for a renewal here you have the same hastle as when you originally applied,don't forget the bank staements showing the transfers.Hope this doesn't put you off as everyone has a different story dealing with officials here.Suerte
 

gouchobob

Registered
A couple of questions for you or for anyone else that may know. How difficult is it to get health care coverage over 65 years of age and how much does it cost?
 

steveinbsas

Registered
gouchobob said:
A couple of questions for you or for anyone else that may know. How difficult is it to get health care coverage over 65 years of age and how much does it cost?
I suggest you start a new thread for this one...

Centro Medico Puerreydon does insure geezers.
 

gouchobob

Registered
steveinbsas said:
I suggest you start a new thread for this one...

Centro Medico Puerreydon does insure geezers.
Well my question is related to retiring here, thought they or someone else could answer.
 

steveinbsas

Registered
blackburn said:
My rentista visa required me to bring $2500 per month into the country.I had to apply to the Argentine consulate,in London,before coming here.Maybe different where you come from but the consulate will give you the info you require.They like the money transfered from the bank abroad to one here,not keen on using the atm for bringing the money here.You have to prove that the money is from a rental property and they don't make it easy.Accountants letters and tenancy agreements etc and they like everything apostiled,stamped with official bodies.When you apply for a renewal here you have the same hastle as when you originally applied,don't forget the bank staements showing the transfers.Hope this doesn't put you off as everyone has a different story dealing with officials here.Suerte
You can use anystable source of income to qualify for the visa. If it is from a pension you can get the visa pensionado and the income requirement is actually a lot less than for the visa rentista. For the visa rentista, the income can be from rental properties but it can also be from an irrevocable trust or dividends from investments, including profit sharing form an ongoing business. It helps if you can show that you have been receiving the income for two years and that it will continue for two more (even though you have to renew the visa annually).

It is once again possible to get the permanent residency on the third renewal, but blackburn is correct, you will have to "prove" continuing income for the three renewals.
 

steveinbsas

Registered
gouchobob said:
Well my question is related to retiring here, thought they or someone else could answer.
I just did, but a new thread would probably get a lot more attention to the question you asked.

I daresay many older folks from the USA who aren't even seeking residency are going to want medical insurance here once Obamacare is passed into law.
 

gouchobob

Registered
steveinbsas said:
I just did, but a new thread would probably get a lot more attention to the question you asked.

I daresay many older folks from the USA who aren't even seeking residency are going to want medical insurance here once Obamacare is passed into law.
Ok, thanks.
 
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