Re: The trees of Buenos Aires

#1
I hope not! I love the trees along the streets here, and to replant would be very expensive. Unfortunately I've seen a few go down after storms and never seen saplings planted in their place. On the other hand there is a large 're-greening" of the city project going on with all the parks being redone -- Parque Centenario has been done very nicely.
I looked around on the web but have yet to find good info about tree species. I did find a guide in Clarin so will post link at bottom. It has a guide to the flowering species. It says:
Una gran parte de ese rico patrimonio ambiental fue plantado allá por 1925, durante la intendencia de M. T. de Alvear, que impulsó un ambicioso "Plan de embellecimiento urbano". En la década del 40 se repusieron miles de ejemplares. Y en los 80 se plantaron tal cantidad de fresnos que hoy constituyen el 50% del arbolado urbano.
Has anyone seen any jacarandas out yet? I know the blooms were just starting to bud in some areas last weekend, so with the hot weather the past couple of days I think they must be about to burst in some places.
Where are your favourite spots for the jacarandas? I absolutely love spring in BA so let us know where you can find the best!
Here's the guide from Clarin: http://www.clarin.com/diario/2005/11/06/laciudad/h-05415.htm
 
#4
One of the most beautiful elements for me in BA is the trees. My two favorites are the Palo Borracho, with its fabulous trunk and amazing pods that release a kind of fluff which I can only decribe as "candyfloss". I also adore the Ombu, which is apparently not really a tree but a giant fungus. (comments welcome).
I do think though the amount of pollution in Buenos Aires must be devastating for all the beautiful plants.
I live in a village near Pilar. it too has fantastic trees. sadly though the local council has bouts of what it terms "Poda". This annual operation entails a crew of men that know nothing about trees that literally attack anything with a machete that falls outside of ones fencing. I have had some very serious encounters with these savage tree killers and a couple of these encounters have terminated when I have had to call the police citing criminal damage to property. Their (councils) stance is that if the branches of the trees around my property (which are planted along the fencing) hang outside the fence they can just come along with an electric saw and slice half of the tree off. You are then left with a tree literally sliced in half which of course results in the trees death if their is suffiecient damage to the trunk. Some very important trees have been murdered in this manner including several Ombu which I believe are supposed to be protected in Argentina.
They also during this "raid" have the maddening habit of daubing anything and everything that has a pole form (and that includes plants and trees) with cheap white and very noxious paint. This is their method for making the village look clean and tidy???????????????????????????????????????
I have tried to start up a "protection" committee not only for the plants but also for the local environment of the village in general. Ideas which include putting building restrictions within the historic village and creating a planning process so that new properties built are not too far out of architectural sync with the local historical style .But most ideas suggested by "outsiders" are subject to delay and obstruction. I have learned that one just has to play it very diplomatically and "play the game" until in the end they take on your ideas as their own. Its a long and slow process but at least that way their "pride" is intact but the result is the one we desire and need.
They never say NO to "outsiders" donating money though and make every effort to make that idea pass smoothly quickly and without obstruction!