Scarcity of Goods Sows Frustration Among Argentines

Marc

Active Member
#2
I heard that the scarcity of milk was due to the cows being attacked by mosquitoes during the recent invasion and also that the country was exporting much more powdered milk.
It saddens me to see how little money this government (and previous ones) puts into the infrastructure...roads, public transport, healthcare not to mention the fiasco regarding the radar at Ezeiza, which was temporarily resolved by Spain lending them one. Whilst on the other hand, AFIP, with their all seeing eye, suck the people clean.
As we have seen before, the people of this beautiful country will only take so much.
 
#3
"MPDC" said:
Hopefully this link works. However, it's not news to us.
The lies are and have always been given to people in three ways lies, damn lies and calculated statistics. I do not know if the Washington post ever comments on US controversial calculated statistics or publishes criticism regarding them but there exists plenty of controversy around US statistics. But controversial statistics are by no means solely an Argentine/US phenomenon but a worldwide one.
Looks to me to be honest that the government of Argentina is doing a better job than many other governments around the world.
 
#4
Why is is that anytime someone makes a critical comment about ARGENTINA the response is to bring up the US in a negative way? What does the US have to do with it? The first poster is right - the infrastructure here leaves a lot to be desired. I have no idea if mosquitos are responsible for aleged milk shortages (I haven't had any problems getting milk) however I am well aware that there are some serious infrastructure problems that need to be addresed. What does the Washington post and statistics in the US have to do with deficiencies in the Argentine public transport system, etc.?
 
#5
"sergio" said:
Why is is that anytime someone makes a critical comment about ARGENTINA the response is to bring up the US in a negative way? What does the US have to do with it? The first poster is right - the infrastructure here leaves a lot to be desired. I have no idea if mosquitos are responsible for aleged milk shortages (I haven't had any problems getting milk) however I am well aware that there are some serious infrastructure problems that need to be addresed. What does the Washington post and statistics in the US have to do with deficiencies in the Argentine public transport system, etc.?
I said that it was a worldwide phenomenon and it is far more logical to ask the question if the Washington post ever comments on US controversial calculated statistics than if it ever comments on statistics regarding Timbuktu since the Washington post is of course based in the US and this article that the original writer mentioned appears on its page.
Hope this answered your question.
 
#6
I thought the whole article was about the obvious energy crisis in Argentina right now. The mention of the milk shortage on the said link was just incidental to the article. I thought the article was informative, right on the money and reflective of the status Buenos Aires is in right now this winter time.
GNC is subsidized by the government, no? What happened to the consumer advocate groups in Buenos Aires?
I too never had a problem locating fresh milk in my nearest grocery store.