schools for children

ghost

Registered
USD, greenbacks. $$$$$
I am not dissing the Argentine schools because they are actually pretty good, however, it is one thing to toss your kid into the culture and quite another if you expect him to do calculus or history in a non-native language. These are things that have much to do with the childs age, ie if the kid is only 4 or 5 then language isn't going to slow them down much.........at 14 or 15 it's another story. [at 4 or 5 years a child picks up language like a sponge]
There are many other Argentine private schools, and German and British. The Argentine privates cost much less. However, Lincoln and BAICA prepare the students for the PSATs and the SATs etc and they run on the US school year. Parents here that have their eye on UCLA or similar find this to be an advantage.
If you suspect that your child will head back to the US for College, then you must consider this. If you are unsure, then, these schools also provide a "Polymodal" program that will help the child attend a local university. [have it both ways, you need to remember that the little angels collect girlfriends along the way and then good old UCLA is off the map and UBA is dead center]
 

Agus

Registered
Lincoln's tutition's runs $3,400-15,000USD depending on grade. It is infact decidedly not North American in population (35%) but the curriculm and philosophy is. The vacation schedule is different than the Argentine schools - 6 weeks at Christmas, 6 weeks in June/July. The language of the playground is castellano but your child can readily transition back into the North Hemisphere or start college in the US or Europe.
 

ghost

Registered
Yes , I rounded too high on Lincoln. Also you have a $6000.00 one time capital fee. Most of these kids are from the various embassies or the parent work for multinationals. Thus the "company" pays the tab. If you are digging into your own pocket you may feel some pain.
 

bigbadwolf

Registered
"bf4" said:
The cambridge exams that students at these schools are trained for are exactly the same of any other bilingual school with an average level (no A levels just IGCSE, exams that british kids stand for at 13 while in Argentina it's during the last year).
The GCSEs are taken at 16 surely(?), with A levels a couple of years later. Most ranking North American universities are happy to take people with A levels. The International Baccalaureate is a good alternative. American curricula, on the other hand, are usually a joke. But if one must go that route, at least aim for a clutch of APs.
 
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