SELL ME on BA .... please :)

katti

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Kyra said:
Sorry if my Norwegian offended anyone. :p

Not offended, just curious about what you wrote and what (I) we didn't understand ;)

Thanks lucas for the translation!
 

Kyra

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bradlyhale said:
This is exactly how it is where I'm from in the U.S. I once worked at a convenience store. One time a man walked in, and I was busy restocking or something. Well, my manager heard the doorbell chime, but he didn't hear me say "Hello" or "Good morning." I got reprimanded. I just didn't notice that a customer entered the store!

The funny thing about greeting customers is that most people will admit that it's so disingenuous. On the other hand, if it is not done, people get their panties in a twist. Let's be honest, I'll bet 99% of people in customer service probably could not careless about how you are doing today. (Hey, I was genuine! :) )

This is so funny, because I don't get why people would want the fake smile and hallos! I find it so uncomfortable with people being overly polite and fake. But (some) americans really seem to value this, and stuff like if the consierge has memorized your name before arriving etc. Is it a need to feel constantly aknowledged and receive attention, or is it just because that's how it's done and it creeps people out if others behave differently? Because I have seen americans judging hotels down and under because they didn't remember their names...
 

bradlyhale

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soulskier said:
How does one get their panties in a twist?

Ha! Good question! It seems there are many variants of this expression.

Kyra said:
stuff like if the consierge has memorized your name before arriving etc. Is it a need to feel constantly aknowledged and receive attention, or is it just because that's how it's done and it creeps people out if others behave differently? Because I have seen americans judging hotels down and under because they didn't remember their names...

I could see that. Another reference to my days in a convenience store: *some* people would be downright hostile if they came in three times a week and I couldn't remember what kind of cigarettes they smoked. I'd ask, "What can I get for you?" and they'd respond, "Well, what I always get!" I just had to smile, and ask, "And what do you always get?" One of my coworkers had been there for months before me and had so many people's orders memorized. I always got compared to her.

I guess that customer service tends to go a bit further in the U.S. than it does in Argentina. Everything is so dependent upon tips in the U.S. Once I took a cab in New York City from La Guardia to JFK, and the cab driver was quick to remind me not to forget to give him a tip. He said, "So you can give 20, 30, 40 dollars. Whatever you want!" I looked at him bewildered, "Are you kidding?" It was a $30 ride! I gave him $5. That wasn't good enough, evidently. He was livid! He went from being all nice and friendly to the world's worst taxi driver. I thought THAT was more than enough! (I feel a lecture coming from a New Yawkuh...:p )

So, my point is that I enjoy not having to have someone hound me for a tip in Argentina. If that makes the customer service different here, so be it.
 

John.St

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Kyra said:
Jeg er forøvrig den eneste nordmannen som ikke liker fisk...fysjameg. Men kjøtt! Nam nam nam! :D
No true Norwegian prefers meat to fish :D:D
 
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