Showing you DNI to authorities.

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Bajo_cero2

Well-Known Member
Ben, when I was young it was legal for the police to demand you to show your DNI. I used to have long hair and dress as a heavy metal. Of course they asked me the ID all the time and I spent several nights at jail just for checking your criminal records that I had none.

Now that I’m old and a lawyer, when they stop me at the roads, normally they do not even ask me for the DNI, with the driver license is enough (law demands both) and they are not even interested in the illegal immigrants who are with me at the car. They just want to know about the engine, fuel consumption and if this is the same car than the Transporter.
 

WST

Registered
How many of those countries have governments that have implemented policies to expel as many "illegal immigrants" as possible?
I'm curious. What exactly is the issue with a country taking back control of it's borders and expelling (as long as properly checked and confirmed) "illegal immigrants"? Unless of course the suggestion is that it is simply an excuse to expel ANY undesirable person, whether here legally or otherwise.

I'd understand if it was simply empathy for actual "illegal immigrants", given the amount of people on here and other 'expats' that have been living in this country 'illegally' for many many years...... (the sympathy often flows freely when it turns out some poor expat has been refused re-entry to the country due to numerous passport stamps as a tourist etc, i.e clear evidence of cheating the system for years). It's about time this sort of thing was dealt with properly.

P.S. - refugees should ALWAYS be welcome, if the country has the resources to support them.
 

Bajo_cero2

Well-Known Member
I'm curious. What exactly is the issue with a country taking back control of it's borders and expelling (as long as properly checked and confirmed) "illegal immigrants"? Unless of course the suggestion is that it is simply an excuse to expel ANY undesirable person, whether here legally or otherwise.

I'd understand if it was simply empathy for actual "illegal immigrants", given the amount of people on here and other 'expats' that have been living in this country 'illegally' for many many years...... (the sympathy often flows freely when it turns out some poor expat has been refused re-entry to the country due to numerous passport stamps as a tourist etc, i.e clear evidence of cheating the system for years). It's about time this sort of thing was dealt with properly.

P.S. - refugees should ALWAYS be welcome, if the country has the resources to support them.
The explanation is that at the AR Bill of rights there is not deportation rights but, instead, the right to stay unless you are a public enemy because the deportation is a religious sanction.
 

ben

Active Member
It is not mandatory to carry the ID in France:
Siri, please give me an example of “red herring”.
I made no reference whatsoever to the C.N.I. This was not an accident.
I did say that carrying ID is required. It is.
Per the Code de procédure pénale (I’m using an old official translation, some brief research shows there are no recent material changes):

Any person found on national territory must accept to undergo an identity check made pursuant to the conditions and by the police authorities considered under the following articles.
[..]
The identity of any person may be checked, on the district prosecutor's written instructions for the investigation and prosecution of offences specified by him, by the means, in the places and for the period of time that this prosecutor determines. The fact that the identity check uncovers offences other than those to which the district prosecutor's instructions refer does not amount to a ground of nullity for any incidental proceedings.
The identity of any person may also be checked pursuant to the rules set out in the first paragraph, whatever the person's behaviour, to prevent a breach of public order and in particular an offence against the safety of persons or property.

This following piece is changed since the official translation I’m using, so simply translating the current official text using Google Translate:

In an area between France's land border with the States Parties to the Convention signed in Schengen on 19 June 1990 and a line drawn 20 kilometers behind, as well as in the areas open to the public from ports, airports and railway stations or roadways open to international traffic and designated by decree and in the vicinity of these stations, for the prevention and investigation of offenses related to cross-border crime, the identity of any person may also be controlled, in the manner provided for in the first paragraph, with a view to verifying compliance with the obligations of holding, carrying and presenting the titles and documents provided for by law. When this check takes place on an international train, it can be operated on the portion of the route between the border and the first stop which is beyond twenty kilometers of the border. However, on lines of railway lines which have an international connection and which have special service characteristics, the check may also be made between that stop and a stop within the limit of the next fifty kilometers. These lines and these stops are designated by ministerial decree. Where there is a motorway section starting in the area referred to in the first sentence of this paragraph and the first motorway toll is beyond the 20 kilometer line, the control may also take place until the first toll on the parking areas as well as on the place of this toll and the adjoining parking areas. The tolls concerned by this provision are designated by decree. The fact that the identity check discloses an offense other than that of non-compliance with the above obligations does not constitute a cause for invalidity of the incidental proceedings.
[..]
Within a maximum radius of 10 kilometers around ports and airports constituting border crossing points within the meaning of Article 2 of Regulation (EU) 2016/399 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 9 March 2016 on a Union Code on the border crossing regime by persons (Schengen Borders Code), designated by decree because of the importance of their attendance and their vulnerability, the identity of any person may be controlled, for research and the prevention of offenses relating to cross-border crime, in accordance with the procedures set out in the first paragraph of this article, with a view to verifying compliance with the obligations to possess, harbor and display the titles and documents provided for by law.

And there’s a lot more where that came from.
This is from some cursory perusing. Surely you could have found this yourself - if you weren’t just looking to score cheap points.

As regards non-citizens, it’s even simpler:

1570679965018.png

neither in Spain:
OK, now you’re just being ridiculous.
Your own screenshot says that people are being fined in Spain for not carrying their DNI.
But because you found an obscure piece where someone thinks they shouldn’t be, you’ll just quote that.
Are you that desperate to score points? GTFOH.
 
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ben

Active Member
How many of those countries have governments that have implemented policies to expel as many "illegal immigrants" as possible?

Just about none, I dare say.
What are your grounds for assuming their immigration policies, as stated and as executed, are any more lax than those in Argentina?
Anecdotal evidence says quite the opposite.
 
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