teleworking bill

gracielle

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The article published by Pagina 12 describes the new law in simpler terms.
31 July 2020
The keys to the Telework Law and how it will affect companies and employees
The Telework Law will regulate a labor modality that was imposed as a result of the coronavirus quarantine and that it is already warned that in many cases it could continue beyond the end of the pandemic. The new norm establishes minimum legal budgets that must be observed when the work is done that way, it will come into effect 90 days after the end of the Social, Preventive and Compulsory Isolation. The specific regulations for each branch of activity will be agreed in the collective agreements negotiated by the unions and businessmen of each sector.
The main points of the new regulation....
 

Dougie

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Anyway, I decided to google a little, I found some more info, for those of you that care about the actual details; it looks like they are just extending standard worker protections and pay levels to people who are being forced to work from home, as well as some other sensible context based measures.
I don't understand what's the controversy then? Seems like it should've passed 100%. Who is against extending the same protections and pay to people working from home?
 

jblaze5779

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I don't understand what's the controversy then? Seems like it should've passed 100%. Who is against extending the same protections and pay to people working from home?
Probably just adds another layer of bs the company will have to deal with between the company, the workers and whatever union they're represented by.
 

London2Baires

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Probably just adds another layer of bs the company will have to deal with between the company, the workers and whatever union they're represented by.
I totally agree! It's far better to let the company do it's own internal regulation right? They never end up exploiting their workers to squeeze out more 'productivity' , right?

The US model has worked great for the last 4 decades, for example. Just deregulate and let wages stagnate while pushing workers to produce more and more. Then after juicing out as much worker blood as possible , you pay the board and shareholders their well deserved profits.

After all, the coroprate elites need the money to pay off the political elites so that they can continue accumulating through trickle up capitalist.

On the other hand, this sort of Argentine policy is so retrograde. I prefer freedom!

 

jblaze5779

Registered
Look at the avg quality of life of the North American and look at the avg quality of life of the South American and tell me who's better off. Yeah you go an extra mile for your job but you also benefit from it.

I admire the South Americans (Args) for their willingness to demand more and set hard limits with their employers. I like how they're clock watching every afternoon ready to run out the door at quitting time. I fantasize about doing that... Overall though, I'd rather answer the cellphone at 7:30pm on a Saturday to handle a call and have the QOL I have.

Argentina is trying to attract foreign investment , adding further layers of rules isn't great for this. it's a balance. Just my take.
 
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London2Baires

Registered
Look at the avg quality of life of the North American and look at the avg quality of life of the South American and tell me who's better off. Yeah you go an extra mile for your job but you also benefit from it.

I admire the South Americans (Args) for their willingness to demand more and set hard limits with their employers. I like how they're clock watching every afternoon ready to run out the door at quitting time. I fantasize about doing that... Overall though, I'd rather answer the cellphone at 7:30pm on a Saturday to handle a call and have the QOL I have. Just my take.
To each his own...
 

Dougie

Registered
I totally agree! It's far better to let the company do it's own internal regulation right? They never end up exploiting their workers to squeeze out more 'productivity' , right?

The US model has worked great for the last 4 decades, for example. Just deregulate and let wages stagnate while pushing workers to produce more and more. Then after juicing out as much worker blood as possible , you pay the board and shareholders their well deserved profits.

After all, the coroprate elites need the money to pay off the political elites so that they can continue accumulating through trickle up capitalist.

On the other hand, this sort of Argentine policy is so retrograde. I prefer freedom!

I have much less faith in regulation by Argentine politicians than you.

It's not either the Argentine model or US model. Why not compare to NZ, Norway, Germany, etc ?
 

London2Baires

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I have much less faith in regulation by Argentine politicians than you.

It's not either the Argentine model or US model. Why not compare to NZ, Norway, Germany, etc ?
That's unlikely as I have no faith in them at all.

You are free to compare whatever models using whichever metrics you see fit. I may even agree with you, anything is possible.

If I'm not mistaken, the poster I was responding to, (as with many other members here) is from the US and keeps saying he doesn't understand this law.

It's just the unions and other dark leftist forces against the poor struggling companies it would seem?

The poster later even says that he prefers the US for all it's faults.

So I'm pretty sure the comparison was started between the US 'approach' re workers and the Arg one, in regards to this specific law. Not vice versa.

If the goalposts are being moved, it's not by me...

Cheers!
 

Dougie

Registered
That's unlikely as I have no faith in them at all.

It's just the unions and other dark leftist forces against the poor struggling companies it would seem?

The poster later even says that he prefers the US for all it's faults.
We are on the same page that there needs to be some oversight of business, especially large corporations, but I don't believe that Argentine politicians do the best job of it, or that the laws they pass are because they are genuinely concerned with workers rights.

Unions can be valuable to protect workers rights and advocate for wage increases. The problem is that many of the Argentine unions are run by mafia figures who become extremely wealthy at the expense of the general public. They extort business and make goods more expensive for everyone, including the working class.

Despite all the faults in the US system, it's hard to argue that Argentina's politicians have created a better system for the poor and working class than the US. Compare East St Louis to the Villas of Santiago del Estero. I'd much rather be poor in East St Louis. NZ, Germany, Norway, etc I think do a better job than the US for creating a prosperous system with more adequate safety nets.

Have a good weekend L2B!
 
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