Temporary Residency application using the Radex website

artisans

Just Joined
Thanks for all your posts. Every time I have been to "Informes" at Migraciones, I have gotten conflicting answers. I will go to building 6 with my question, as you suggest. A few months back a poster said that Radex was asking him for a new police report for a residency renewal. Do you know if that is the case? I ask you or whoever might know because they have never asked for that before for a renewal. Of course, I can't get far enough into Radex at this point to find out because I am more than 60 days out.
Yes, going to "Informes" at Migraciones is like a bad joke punctuated with a 2 1/2 to 3 hour wait to get to someone who may or not be helpful. And no one as far as I know will tell you about Bldg 6 and even there, there's no "informes" box. However I was told to ask questions in the D section by a woman in Judiciales section. It worked!
As this is my first rodeo I can't speak to residency renewal. However, in the version of Radex that I applied in, first time application for residency, as long as you don't elect to pay an extra 10,000AR to be 'expedited' then the police report came as part of the Radex application. They fetch the criminal report. You pay an extra invoice for 148 pesos for that service, which had to be paid at a Correos.
 

Stantucker

Registered
Yes, going to "Informes" at Migraciones is like a bad joke punctuated with a 2 1/2 to 3 hour wait to get to someone who may or not be helpful. And no one as far as I know will tell you about Bldg 6 and even there, there's no "informes" box. However I was told to ask questions in the D section by a woman in Judiciales section. It worked!
As this is my first rodeo I can't speak to residency renewal. However, in the version of Radex that I applied in, first time application for residency, as long as you don't elect to pay an extra 10,000AR to be 'expedited' then the police report came as part of the Radex application. They fetch the criminal report. You pay an extra invoice for 148 pesos for that service, which had to be paid at a Correos.
Thanks. I wasn't clear enough in my post: what I need to know is if I need new antecedentes penales for my country of origin? That's what was not requested in the first renewal we did. Someone posted a few months back that Radex was asking for that.
 

Stantucker

Registered
Thanks. I wasn't clear enough in my post: what I need to know is if I need new antecedentes penales for my country of origin? That's what was not requested in the first renewal we did. Someone posted a few months back that Radex was asking for that.
I just got out of sector D of building 6. I walked in and saw an agent was not with anyone and I asked her: she said that the system does not recognize if it's a renewal or a cambio de categoría, therefore if it's a renewal, you have only to
upload a blank piece of paper where it asks for the antecedentes penales/ police background check from your country of origin.
 

Stantucker

Registered
Thank you for contributing to the conversation on this. I would certainly welcome the easy fix on this through a "Legalization", however as this document verification has unfolded with Immigraciones there have been 3 events - #1 was the criminal history from my country of residence, this was an document external to Argentina but it required legalization by the country of residence, then apostille by the Argentina Embassy of that country #2 when submitting pension proof documents through Radex, my US origin documents were translated and legalized here in Bs - Immigraciones asked for an Apostille. I then added the U.S. Embassy benefits letter in Spanish and they then finalized the Radex application and appeared to accept the application as complete. But today it became clear they were waiting for more. #3 today, visiting the Ex-Mercosur D window at Bldg 6 the woman reviewed my application and told me the reason I hadn't gotten an appointment was they were waiting an Apostilled doc. She said that the U. S. Embassy benefits letter in Spanish was acceptable and then she made a photocopy of someone else's document that was Apostilled here in Bs as an example - and told me to return with my U.S. Embassy doc Apostilled. As in the example she provided. There was no offer that it could alternatively be 'Legalized'. I'm in real need of the Precaria asap and not inclined to test her contrary to her helpful advice.
I'll appreciate your reply and further opinion. One's as good as the other to me but I need one that they'll accept.
The ministry of external affairs is at the corner of Arenales and Esmeralda. I bet that is where they are sending you and what they showed as an apostille is actually a legalization. Did they actually use the word in Spanish for apostille? If they did, maybe they are just using that term loosely.

Also, thanks so much for all your posts about your experience. They are a real contribution to this community. While I am in a different boat, renewing rather than getting initial residency, they have been helpful to me. Even though I have been to building 6, sector D before a number of times in the past and a friend has been telling me to go back, I am always reluctant because you never quite know what you are going to find. Your post yesterday was the final impetus I needed and I got exactly the info I was looking for in just a few minutes this morning. Thanks and keep posting.
 

artisans

Just Joined
The ministry of external affairs is at the corner of Arenales and Esmeralda. I bet that is where they are sending you and what they showed as an apostille is actually a legalization. Did they actually use the word in Spanish for apostille? If they did, maybe they are just using that term loosely.

Also, thanks so much for all your posts about your experience. They are a real contribution to this community. While I am in a different boat, renewing rather than getting initial residency, they have been helpful to me. Even though I have been to building 6, sector D before a number of times in the past and a friend has been telling me to go back, I am always reluctant because you never quite know what you are going to find. Your post yesterday was the final impetus I needed and I got exactly the info I was looking for in just a few minutes this morning. Thanks and keep posting.
Thanks for your reply and really pleased you found success in answering your question at Bldg 6.
To your point about "legalizado" and "apostille", looking back through the Radex people's replies they used both words for the same document like this "legalizado (apostille)". That set of the alarms, not knowing that here it can mean the same thing and is really, apparently, a legalizacion. When I spoke with the woman at Bldg 6 I'm sure she said apostille, but looking closer now at the example she printed out for me - it's a legalization! So apologies to the OP who said earlier that they equal here. Now it comes down to getting it done and I find one address for this service at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs: Esmeralda 1214 and to request a 'turn' here https://www.argentina.gob.ar/legalizar-o-apostillar-un-documento Next turn available is in early June.
If you have advice for a walk-in location, much appreciated.
 

Macanudo

Newcomer
You could make an appointment, print out the date and go down to Esmeralda 1214. Then try to convince them you have some sort of emergency and have to get it done immediately. If that doesn't work, checking the website everyday looking to see if there is an earlier date available due to a cancelation. If so you will probably have to cancel your appointment before you can make a new one.
 

Stantucker

Registered
Thanks for your reply and really pleased you found success in answering your question at Bldg 6.
To your point about "legalizado" and "apostille", looking back through the Radex people's replies they used both words for the same document like this "legalizado (apostille)". That set of the alarms, not knowing that here it can mean the same thing and is really, apparently, a legalizacion. When I spoke with the woman at Bldg 6 I'm sure she said apostille, but looking closer now at the example she printed out for me - it's a legalization! So apologies to the OP who said earlier that they equal here. Now it comes down to getting it done and I find one address for this service at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs: Esmeralda 1214 and to request a 'turn' here https://www.argentina.gob.ar/legalizar-o-apostillar-un-documento Next turn available is in early June.
If you have advice for a walk-in location, much appreciated.
That's really weird because last year you could get an appt for two or three days later. I am not convinced that you can't just walk in. I would try that. The worst is that they tell you no, you have to wait. As Macanudo suggests, I would plead my case as an emergency.
 

artisans

Just Joined
That's really weird because last year you could get an appt for two or three days later. I am not convinced that you can't just walk in. I would try that. The worst is that they tell you no, you have to wait. As Macanudo suggests, I would plead my case as an emergency.
Thanks to you and Macanudo for suggestions and perspective. Apparently the delays are real now, but even a month and a half ago I got something legalized through the escribano and it was ready in a day or two. Now the escribano just shakes his head. I also thought of walking in with the doc and giving it a shot. Macanudos technique of appointment and walking in declaring an emergency is good. But right now, for mine, the escribano would have to retrieve the doc, give it back to me before i could try walking it in.
What I did do today was getting a letter from the escribano confirming working on it and delayed by no appointments, then took it to Bldg 6 "D" and gave it to the woman who took an interest in my case. She wrote a note and her contact info back to the escribano. But she confirmed that without that legalized doc she cannot start work on getting the Precaria. Hamstrung but no longer walking blind.
 

artisans

Just Joined
My thanks to deadOA, Macanudo and Stantucker for encouragements to take a shot at Esmeralda 1214, Cancilleria Argentina en Retiro / Ministry of Foreign Affairs -whathaveyou. As a friend and I were opining this week, here you make your own luck. I decided not to wait further on the Escribano.
The doc I needed legalized/apostilled (here, inside Argentina, those terms seem to be interchangeable) was a proof of pension. A simple income statement in Spanish from the US Embassy in Argentina. I wasn't in possession of the original so I printed out in color a scanned copy. I took that plus passport and the note the attendant at Bldg 6 "D" had given me stating what was needed, plus here example copy of a similar document. I got to the entrance of 1214, and whether by chance or standard practice there was a man talking to Mercosur types who were sweating some issue. I got his attention and told him I had an emergency need, his first impulse was to turn me back, and then he looked at the docs I had. He changed his mind and waived me in, through the metal detector, showed me the way to the area below and guided me to a window where a guy heard my case, looked at the papers, asked me if I was able to pay the emergency fee (normal fee is 400 p, emergency is an additional 400 p - total 800 p). I assured him yes, he gave me an invoice and a appointment number, and sent me to the 'bank' window. Presented the invoice, they only accept credit cards - no cash, gave the credit card, signed a receipt. Done. Watched the tv screen until my appt number came up, another guy at a window, took my doc, again stalled me because it was a US Embassy doc, I showed him the note from the Immigraciones woman and the example she had given me (US Embassy letter, legalized) and he gave up and gave me a new appointment card, told to watch for my number on a different screen. This part was confusing, the numbers (many) rolled on the screen - 4 digits, my card had 5. Disregard the 0.
It took about 20 minutes, when I heard my number called out. Went to the window with my card, attendant handed me back the legalized doc. And done! Blazing speed and there was a room full of people waiting their turn.
This place is the most organized, high tech and speed oriented I've seen here.
If you don't speak Spanish you might want to take someone who can and who can make your case as you move along from one checker to the next.
Thanks again to my mentors.
 

Fiscal

Registered
How hard is it to get the FBI background check apostilled? I guess I am a little confused. I have my birth certificate apostilled from the US State of issuance. The FBI Background check, I have a paper and PDF copy, not apostilled. Do I have to get the FBI background check apostilled in the US, via Argentina's embassy in DC?
 
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