US citizen deported at Ezeiza

sternum

Registered
The six month rule was made for people that work in different countries to decide where to pay tax. It sais very clearly in double tax agreements that it is not a matter of days. Where you live, is a matter of where you have your belongings, insurances, economic duties, union engagement and family.
I cannot see that you violate a tourist visa, if you live in airbnb or hostel, have no bank account, foreign health insurance and stay 250 days a year. You actually even can have a vacation apartment.
Responsibility must be put on the immigration. If they let you in, I cannot see how it can be the tourist fault, that he is here.
 

sternum

Registered
The solution id to apply for citizenship and, if you do it while you have the legal residency, it is going to be straight forward.
My country will take a big part of my pension, if I move here, outside EU. Pensioners are trying to take the government to court for this. Maybe it will change, but we do not know. There is a double tax agreement with my country, so I have to move officially. I must sell my apartment in my country, because I cannot owe this apartment, living somewhere else. My dad is 90 and my mom is 87 and live separated. I am the responsible person for them. If I live here, I will only be allowed 3 month in my country if something happens. I was previously advised not to renew my residency.
 

Bajo_cero2

Registered
The six month rule was made for people that work in different countries to decide where to pay tax. It sais very clearly in double tax agreements that it is not a matter of days. Where you live, is a matter of where you have your belongings, insurances, economic duties, union engagement and family.
I cannot see that you violate a tourist visa, if you live in airbnb or hostel, have no bank account, foreign health insurance and stay 250 days a year. You actually even can have a vacation apartment.
Responsibility must be put on the immigration. If they let you in, I cannot see how it can be the tourist fault, that he is here.
The AR law follows the british system where they ckeck the animus ibi revertindi: where you are abd come back. Abd what id your intention. Your country follows the german system.
 

nikad

Registered
Fair enough.

On the other hand, from what I have seen as a humble outsider, laws here are so selectively enforced that the people dealing with the implementation of the laws are the ones who advise the rest of the public which are enforced and how so. Drinking on the street, construction permits, taxes, the law as written is one thing, its implementation is another. Just look at the post directly above this one...
I hear you, however the law is presumed to be known by all. This is a basic principle. I know that many laws are not enforced, however there is going to be a point ( a few weeks or decades ) where Argentina is going to start doing things seriously and acting like a grown up and not a teenager anymore. Most people doing visa runs, etc come from developed countries where laws are enforced, I can understand a fellow Latin American being in shock over law enforcement...
 

nikad

Registered
Most people come and stay for as long as they want, legal or not. The problem is when you are playing smart, coming and going just to keep your " visa " from expiring. You raise flags, you go past immigration over and over... I never really understood it! It is just so easy to come and stay, and then take off for good when you want to that those visa runs seemed like Russian roulette to me. I know a lot of people doing it are young and naive, but sometimes it is key to just keep a low profile.
 

nikad

Registered
This is an election year, the government is a disaster, the economy is sinking by the day and showing they can control the borders is relatively easier than doing what needs to be done to put the country back on track. That is my humble opinion.
 
I hear you, however the law is presumed to be known by all. This is a basic principle. I know that many laws are not enforced, however there is going to be a point ( a few weeks or decades ) where Argentina is going to start doing things seriously and acting like a grown up and not a teenager anymore. Most people doing visa runs, etc come from developed countries where laws are enforced, I can understand a fellow Latin American being in shock over law enforcement...
I have been made to understand that 100% compliance with current tax laws and regulations in this country would be impossible for most businesses and bring economic activity here to a standstill.

In terms of "developed" countries, the US certainly has selective enforcement of many of its laws. Flow of traffic on LA highways is generally 10mph or more over posted speed limits, police departments in many cities look the other way over public alcohol consumption if lightly concealed, the gastronomy and construction industries rely on the employment of undocumented immigrants, etc.
 

nikad

Registered
I have been made to understand that 100% compliance with current tax laws and regulations in this country would be impossible for most businesses and bring economic activity here to a standstill.

In terms of "developed" countries, the US certainly has selective enforcement of many of its laws. Flow of traffic on LA highways is generally 10mph or more over posted speed limits, police departments in many cities look the other way over public alcohol consumption if lightly concealed, the gastronomy and construction industries rely on the employment of undocumented immigrants, etc.
I hear you, let's say that the general level of law enforcement is higher than in most Latin American countries ( in the US ).
 
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