Accent reduction coach near Palermo?

bdk1

Registered
Hi, I think you gave him a good tip, but this "aspirated S" is typical of a low cultural level. It all depends on what is he looking for. If he wants to meet new people or apply for a job, he shouldn´t speak like that. Just my point of view, hope it will be useful. Regards. Roxana
It's not. It is an intrinsic characteristic of the Rioplatense dialect (as well as others), and completely devoid of sociolectal connotations. You might be referring to the aspirated S at the end of a word when it is not followed by a consonant (such as "¡vamo'!" instead of "¡vamos!", or "¿qué hacé'?" instead of "¿qué hacés?"), which is indeed associated with a lower class.

If you are a native speaker of the Rioplatense dialect, try to hear yourself in a normal conversation and you will notice that you won't say "esss verdad" but "eh verdad" (the "h" here being an aspirated S, not a Spanish silent H). Like in any other language, most native speakers don't stop to think about these things, they'll do it naturally. Try asking the average Spanish speaker on the street the Subjuntivo rules - they won't even know what Subjuntivo is and likely never noticed it existed, even though they use it daily.
 

ß Aquarii

Registered
Hi

I'm looking for a private tutor who can help reduce my US English accent when I speak Castellaño. In the Palermo area preferably.
Where in the US are you from? Depending on your EN-US dialect, finding your stride in the accent depends on what physical forms your mouth and tongue are used to. Being from CA (and nearby Mexico) I learned to roll my rr's as a kid outside of school. In parts of the US south, the "a" vowel is more strongly pronounced than a native Oregonian or Washingtonian would use. And now that I teach English (with a focus on accents and pronunciation-the "th" sound is almost exclusively English and very difficult for many learners) accenting is particularly interesting to me.

Sorry, though, I do not have any recommendations. I would definitely defer to our peers in this thread.

Best of luck fellow!
 
A key is to open the mouth to pronounce the 5 vowels (a, e, i, o, u) clearly and exaggeratedly. Also, do not pronounce the /r/ with the tip of the tongue...and others. There are special exercises and tongue twisters to work other muscles... and, of course, reading aloud (with and whitout obstacle in the mouth and exaggeratedly to increase the effort). Perception alert, perseverance, repetition are important. There are Chinese who can pronounce the /r/, nothing is impossible...
 

RPVEN

Registered
It's not. It is an intrinsic characteristic of the Rioplatense dialect (as well as others), and completely devoid of sociolectal connotations. You might be referring to the aspirated S at the end of a word when it is not followed by a consonant (such as "¡vamo'!" instead of "¡vamos!", or "¿qué hacé'?" instead of "¿qué hacés?"), which is indeed associated with a lower class.

If you are a native speaker of the Rioplatense dialect, try to hear yourself in a normal conversation and you will notice that you won't say "esss verdad" but "eh verdad" (the "h" here being an aspirated S, not a Spanish silent H). Like in any other language, most native speakers don't stop to think about these things, they'll do it naturally. Try asking the average Spanish speaker on the street the Subjuntivo rules - they won't even know what Subjuntivo is and likely never noticed it existed, even though they use it daily.
Hi! Yes, I am a native. Lingüist, translator, and interpreter. But, beyond my degrees(that´s not the point), I wouldn´t have finished primary school if I have spoken like "eh verdad"
Regards.
 
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