African-American life in BA

Bek

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Hello everybody!

I’m new here and this is my first post.
V, if you don’t mind I would like to ask you: money gives people the right to criticise?
.:BEK:.

"nikad" said:
Being critical helps growing, insulting on the other hand only generates nasty reactions. I think any expat paying taxes, investing or contributing to the country´s growth in any way - instead of speculating with exchange rates, etc has each and every right to criticise, everything, this is a country of inmigrants. But then again, that is just my opinion.

I am not american and do not condone american policy so to state hear that anyone who critisizes argentina should go to the Usa is very insensitive.
Its strange but I have found my fellow argentine citizens very critical of their country and people but when an expat dares to say a word of critisism they are told to leave .
Argentina is the most beautiful country and I beleive that it offers a lot of reasons to be here . Everyone is welcome here and your opinions are yours to be expressed in free forums here

V
 

nikad

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"Bek" said:
Hello everybody!

I’m new here and this is my first post.
V, if you don’t mind I would like to ask you: money gives people the right to criticise?
.:BEK:.


Being critical helps growing, insulting on the other hand only generates nasty reactions. I think any expat paying taxes, investing or contributing to the country´s growth in any way - instead of speculating with exchange rates, etc has each and every right to criticise, everything, this is a country of inmigrants. But then again, that is just my opinion.

I am not american and do not condone american policy so to state hear that anyone who critisizes argentina should go to the Usa is very insensitive.
Its strange but I have found my fellow argentine citizens very critical of their country and people but when an expat dares to say a word of critisism they are told to leave .
Argentina is the most beautiful country and I beleive that it offers a lot of reasons to be here . Everyone is welcome here and your opinions are yours to be expressed in free forums here

V
I think you missed the part where I said ¨contribute to the country growth¨ and that is not necessarily with money. it is about creating, building, helping, teaching, etc etc etc
V
 

donquixote

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Hi.
I'm a US citizen of Mexican ancestory and show my indian heritage. I've been to Buenos Aires twice and never have felt discriminated against. I was looking a a photo I took in Florida street and the faces look just like mine. Argentines fancy themselve as being European and don't acknowledge the fact that a great deal of indian blood flows through thair vains.
Carlos
 

ericdharma

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I think that we need to wake up to the reality of how things really are in Buenos Aires. People here are openly discriminatory against pretty much anyone who is different from them. I am African American and from the U.S.. I am posting this because it is clear to me that a lot of people who are posting are caucasian who have not spent a lot of time here or are Argentines who are understandably biased in a certain way. I will refrain from personal incidences and will call your attention to 2 of many incidents that were in the news to highlight what I am talking about.
First I would mention the recent murder of a youth outside of a club here in Buenos Aires. He was standing outside because the establishment had insisted that two separate lines be formed to enter the club one being for dark-skinned people and costing 5 pesos more and the other being for caucasians. The boy was with a darker-skinned friend and didn´t enter the club because they wouldn't let his friend in with him and was later killed in an altercation. I would also like to bring up the strike against ALL Asian grocers by the truckers Union because an Asian store owner had an fight with one of the drivers which lead to the driver being shot. As a result the Union decide to boycott EVERY Asian grocery store and would not make deliveries to them. These people were from all over Asian and I'm sure that some of them didn't even know the Asian man who did the shooting. It almost caused an economic crisis when the Argentine stores raised prices due to the lack of competition and Kirchner had to step in and put an end to it. Walk around and actually open your eyes for a change. Might it occur to you that you frequently see Indians and darker skinned Argentines begging on the street and in low paying jobs because the are being systematically sidelined in terms of the local economy. The only reason that I am posting this is that I want this resource to be valuable and above all truthful. Buenos Aires is about where the U.S. was in the 40's and 50's in term of civil rights. I'm sure that things will get better with time but let's be realistic for the sake of potential visitors.
 

nikad

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"ericdharma" said:
I think that we need to wake up to the reality of how things really are in Buenos Aires. People here are openly discriminatory against pretty much anyone who is different from them. I am African American and from the U.S.. I am posting this because it is clear to me that a lot of people who are posting are caucasian who have not spent a lot of time here or are Argentines who are understandably biased in a certain way. I will refrain from personal incidences and will call your attention to 2 of many incidents that were in the news to highlight what I am talking about.
First I would mention the recent murder of a youth outside of a club here in Buenos Aires. He was standing outside because the establishment had insisted that two separate lines be formed to enter the club one being for dark-skinned people and costing 5 pesos more and the other being for caucasians. The boy was with a darker-skinned friend and didn´t enter the club because they wouldn't let his friend in with him and was later killed in an altercation. I would also like to bring up the strike against ALL Asian grocers by the truckers Union because an Asian store owner had an fight with one of the drivers which lead to the driver being shot. As a result the Union decide to boycott EVERY Asian grocery store and would not make deliveries to them. These people were from all over Asian and I'm sure that some of them didn't even know the Asian man who did the shooting. It almost caused an economic crisis when the Argentine stores raised prices due to the lack of competition and Kirchner had to step in and put an end to it. Walk around and actually open your eyes for a change. Might it occur to you that you frequently see Indians and darker skinned Argentines begging on the street and in low paying jobs because the are being systematically sidelined in terms of the local economy. The only reason that I am posting this is that I want this resource to be valuable and above all truthful. Buenos Aires is about where the U.S. was in the 40's and 50's in term of civil rights. I'm sure that things will get better with time but let's be realistic for the sake of potential visitors.

Ericdharma,I am local and caucasian, and yes, I believe porteños are discriminatory to some extent, though the club incident was unacceptable, I couldn´t believe it myself!!!
The Asian supermarkets conflict, I really do not think this was because of the owners being asian, but more because all these supermarkets work as a cooperative, like a union, that is why they get low prices ( they all buy together, etc )
I would risk saying that the people that discriminate here are usually mid aged upper/high class porteños, especially in some neighbourhoods like Recoleta, Barrio Norte, Belgrano, some parts of Palermo too. It is very sad, but true. Now if you go to any barrio ( San Telmo, Villa Crespo, Almagro, Chacarita, etc ) things are different. Porteños have this thing for calling people names ¨moishe¨¨ruso¨ if you are jewish, ¨gallego¨ if you are spanish, ¨tano¨for italians, ¨ponja¨or ¨chino¨ for any asian, ¨bolita¨ to any dark skinned person coming from Bolivia, Peru and ¨negro¨ for african americans - and also for white people.

A lot of people deny their indian blood, I proudly say ( being genealogy one of my biggest hobbies ) that I have italian, german, spanish and catamarqueño ascendance!

I would like to hear about your experiences.

V
 

BAJay

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Vaughn,
Black people form anywhere are rare here but do exist without problems. I have to agree with Gracille that there is covert discrimination, but I am close with a Nigerian family who are raising their children here without any problems and had integrated nicely. I recently had a long conversation with an African-American man who had lived in BA previously and was here visiting for a wedding. The only problem he encountered was he felt he stood out as a foriegner to the point of attracting just about every street scam and pick pocket in Buenos Aires. I can only immagine his only advice would be to remain vigilant if in the city for this kind of scam.
 

indohippie1

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yeah, well, i'd say it's pretty hard being black in bsas. but i thank my lucky stars that i'm not chinese. Argies are REALLY racist toward them and its not even covert.
 

ptrwong05

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"indohippie1" said:
yeah, well, i'd say it's pretty hard being black in bsas. but i thank my lucky stars that i'm not chinese. Argies are REALLY racist toward them and its not even covert.
Hi, I'm a Chinese from South East Asia who plan to move to BA in the near future. I speak Spanish pretty well. After reading such a comment, I have started another thread concerning whether Chinese can blend well into the local society of BA. I feel a little worry about the issue of racism in BA. Your opinion and advice are appreciated. Thanks.
 

loribuenosaires

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I have lived here for 10 years and asked many Argentines what they thought about the lack of blacks in Bs As and none of them were racist, most wished there was more variety here color wise. We don't have the mix here that we have in the states, I miss that. My Argentine fiance loved the mix of colors in Miami. His Mom finds the blacks very beautiful. I think you will have a good time here.
 
C

Claudio

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Dear Vaughn:
I apologize about my poor english and lack of time (If I get caught, I could be fired...) but I suggest you to search on the argentine caboverdean community. By the way, I tell you I use to read about this subject because actually I'm not white. I'm arab lebanese descendant then I'm not caucasian. I absolutely understand your curiosity.
a handshake
Claudio
 
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