any update on the after effects of the farmer's strike

BAJoe

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"smith" said:
I'm waiting for the "workers' paradise" contingent to jump all over BA Joe. Don't you know that any tax is a good tax?
Imagine a country that in the 19th century built itself on agricultural exports to be the 5th (?) largest economy in the world, and now imposes a (what is it? 45%) tax on agricultural exports. Talk about cutting off your own pecker. Can anyone please help these wonderful people?
Smith
Anyone else worried about Argentina´s present and future?
Have any other expats ever found yourselves wishing you could give your 2 cents, straight to the Government? (anyone for that matter)
Have you ever thought or said: Why don´t they just do this or that and problem solved!!??
As a foreigner don´t you sometimes positively KNOW what the answer to a problem is having seen it done elsewhere, but just can´t locate the right beaurocrat to address the solution to?
Would you like to do something to REALLY CHANGE AND HELP THIS COUNTRY??
I have an idea that just may do the trick....
.....follow me to the follwing post:
phpwsbb~PHPWSBB_MAN_OP~view~PHPWS_MAN_ITEMS~2611.html
 

Matty

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BAJoe, I was talking more along the lines of the farmers really. People that are really close to my heart, anywhere in the world. This is my first exposure to how powerful farmers can be when they are backed with money - theirs.
I think the farmers in Argentina never really got the respect that they are due and so far I am learning something about this country everyday. It is never boring here. :)
 

Matty

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Has anything like this ever happened in Argentina in its entire history? It seems surreal to watch the videos on the news.
 

RWS

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Quoting "Matty": "Has anything like this ever happened in Argentina in its entire history? . . . ."
Yes, and worse. But that's usually resulted in either civil war or revolution.
 

Mike1

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Civil war here? Highly unlikely, since there hasn't been one since 1828. Radical political movements, protests, and changes in political leaders, yes but as for others, NO. This is not Central America where violent military juntas and rebels are running all over the place, constantly changing hands with power.
 

steveinbsas

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Civil war in Argentina? Not since 1828. Military junta in Argentina? Not since 1983. Also known as the "Dirty War" (beginning in 1976). Some expats may have heard of the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo but not be aware of the history of the military junta and the subsequent loss of loved ones that drives their weekly demonstrations. There is a lot of information to be found on the internet. A good place to start is: www4.cnn.com/WORLD/9803/02/argentina.dirty.war./The "after effects" of the arrest, torture, and disappearance of as many as 30,000 are still being felt today, as millions of Argentines still have "living memories" of these events. We expats would be well served to learn more about the history of this country, not that we should fear a repeat of a military dictatorship or even the economic collapse of 2002, but perhaps to better understand the attitudes of the Argentines we often find so "edgy" and volatile.
 

RWS

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Quoting "steveinbsas": "Civil war in Argentina? Not since 1828. Military junta in Argentina? Not since 1983. Also known as the "Dirty War" (beginning in 1976). . . ."
And that, to my mind, was tantamount to a civil war. Even if it were to be discounted (based on such gross imbalance of force? of legitimacy? or on lack of constant visibility?), as also that of 1930 (a mere coup? because so brief?), surely the careful reader will discern that Rosas was driven from power not by a revolution but by the penultimate phase of an extended civil war. His ascension to power marked not the end of internecine conflict, but the consolidation of a pattern.
 

Matty

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When all of this started in April 08 there were several instances that supply at the grocery dipped (loads of news article to back this up). Has there been in anytime in Argentina's history has the desabasticimiento been worst than April of 08. I was thinking if a place has a "special" word for the phenomenon - then it is not the first time something like that has happened, correct? Maybe this is just a cycle or pattern and even if it can clearly stagnate the growth of this nation - if it is inherent in its resident to go thru this every few years -we just have to hold on tight and "enjoy the ride"?!
I would hate to think that the Argentinians like these occurences and sort of things - the uncertainty, the chaos, the inefficiency. And I have yet to meet a taxi driver who though voted for CK is supporting her now - I have heard one say - the choripan given away at the rallies just about what keeps the crowd coming but aside from that....
 

Mike1

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"Matty" said:
When all of this started in April 08 there were several instances that supply at the grocery dipped (loads of news article to back this up). Has there been in anytime in Argentina's history has the desabasticimiento been worst than April of 08. I was thinking if a place has a "special" word for the phenomenon - then it is not the first time something like that has happened, correct? Maybe this is just a cycle or pattern and even if it can clearly stagnate the growth of this nation - if it is inherent in its resident to go thru this every few years -we just have to hold on tight and "enjoy the ride"?!
I would hate to think that the Argentinians like these occurences and sort of things - the uncertainty, the chaos, the inefficiency. And I have yet to meet a taxi driver who though voted for CK is supporting her now - I have heard one say - the choripan given away at the rallies just about what keeps the crowd coming but aside from that....
Erm... I was the photojournalist at the rally in Plaza de Mayo yesterday and there were no choripans or drinks being handed out. I'm gettin' no love from CK and her supporters...
 

Matty

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You should count your lucky star Mike1 - one guy from Tucuman was not as fortunate as you. The taxi I took yesterday said - he has to say no to people who wanted to go to downtown. He said he was not interested in the choripan - thus my toungue in cheek comment. :)
 
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