Are you supposed to tip in hotels?

nikad

Registered
Wow you don't tip? Your wife, who I believe is Argentine says we don't tip here? That is very strange!!! Unless you come from a culture when this is a big no, ie. Chinese, we all tip! Hotels, restaurants, bars, coffee stores, cabs, delivery guys, etc. The only places where I do not leave a tip are fast food restaurants ( McD, Starbucks, etc )
 

Ceviche

Registered
Its 50 /50.

I never tip the taxi guys like i have seen some American expats doing here in BA.

I tip the delivery guy if he comes up to my door but not if he refuses to come up and ask me to meet him down.

I do tip in restaurants - 10%.

I dont tip people who forcefully try to open cab door for me at aeroparque airport or in hotels.

I tip my porteros big to ensure there is no animosity as i travel away often.
 

garryl

Registered
Wow you don't tip? Your wife, who I believe is Argentine says we don't tip here? That is very strange!!! Unless you come from a culture when this is a big no, ie. Chinese, we all tip! Hotels, restaurants, bars, coffee stores, cabs, delivery guys, etc. The only places where I do not leave a tip are fast food restaurants ( McD, Starbucks, etc )
Haha, it's true. Chinese do not like to tip. Tip does not exist in China. French does not tip much either, but they do leave symbolic tips.
 

perry

Registered
Wow you don't tip? Your wife, who I believe is Argentine says we don't tip here? That is very strange!!! Unless you come from a culture when this is a big no, ie. Chinese, we all tip! Hotels, restaurants, bars, coffee stores, cabs, delivery guys, etc. The only places where I do not leave a tip are fast food restaurants ( McD, Starbucks, etc )
Not tipping for good service is a sign of disrespect for the other . I have never heard that tipping is not common in Argentina . Is the original poster looking for controversy only ?
 

Ceviche

Registered
[QUOTE="perry, post: 366877, member: 506"I have never heard that tipping is not common in Argentina . QUOTE]

Its not common.

Its a phenomenon of uSA and first world countries.
 

mmoon

Registered
I tip most everywhere, and in Argentina, around 8–10%. I used to wait tables, and once you’ve worked for tips, you’ll always be a good tipper. It’s just a good/right thing to do. Plus, I’m from the US and it seems that the only consistently good reputation we have as foreigners is that A) we tip, and B) we have good teeth.
 

garryl

Registered
I tip most everywhere, and in Argentina, around 8–10%. I used to wait tables, and once you’ve worked for tips, you’ll always be a good tipper. It’s just a good/right thing to do. Plus, I’m from the US and it seems that the only consistently good reputation we have as foreigners is that A) we tip, and B) we have good teeth.
Can you post of pic of your teeth ? :) Another country, Mexico, parents there seem to care more about their children's teeth and dental care too. Among the wealthy nations, Japan is probably the worst. China (not wealthy country) is bad, but the younger generation teeth is much better. I used to have a coworker who served in US air force in 70s, he was stationing in Germany. Life was pretty boring for him, meeting with German girls was his biggest pleasure. I asked what was his secret to be popular with German girls, he said tax free liquor from military base and good teeth.
 

Joglide

Registered
I'm in a business hotel in Cordoba, and the waiter mentioned that below the check, is a form I can complete to leave him a tip. Is this normal? I've never really tipped in Argentina before other than on one special occasion because the waiter went out of his way for me. I always assumed you don't ordinarily tip, so I was surprised the hotel had a form to fill out, and on top of that, the waiter mentioned it.
My experience is that Argentinians almost always warmly appreciate a gratuity of say 5% or 10%. If the service has been poor I don't tip or for a coffee served from a counter or nearby, again usually do not. Cannot get the American custom of compulsory tipping of 15%-20%. I once paid a group dinner with a business credit card in Washington that came to about USD$3,500, so the waiter got $500, for a two hour dinner. When I tipped a relatively poor service/indifferent waiter about 12-14% in Boston once, he was visibly put out and used the word 'stiffed' to a fellow waiter. One reason I avoid US service industry. In BA I find the service people much more courteous in general, though not always and certainly not at airports. In France you get beautiful, stylish service in many places and the traditional French custom is to leave small change.
 
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