Argentine visas

ramor

Newcomer
Could anybody tell me if anything has changed in terms of tourist visas for UK passport holder. Can you still stay for 3 months and then leave for Uruguay and come back. Can you keep doing this indefently?
Myself and my husband are moving to BA in a couple of weeks. I have a job starting there and therefore getting a working visa. We do have the option of putting him down as part of my visa but just not sure about doing this as I feel the Argentinian authorities would maybe make him announce any work he does from Argentina for the UK. Tax purposes and so on.....
Does anybody have any advice on this? Has anybody been in this situation?

Thanks
 

steveinbsas

Registered
Your husband can go to migraciones just before the expiration of his 90 day visa and get a 90 day extension for 100 pesos. After those 90 days he will need to go to Uruguay to start over unless he is entitled to join you while you are here with your work visa.

I don't have the answer to that question. I just wanted to post what I do know so he wouldn't make the trip to Uruguay 90 days before it is necessary.
 

thebookcellar

Active Member
please do not take my advice as law - but i think you should ask people what they think after you have read what i am about to write.
As far as i know if your husband is working from Argentina for a company based in the uk and being paid into AN ACCOUNT IN THE UK then i believe that nothing can be said. he is on your visa as your husband - if you have a salary that can support you both then there is little that can be investigated.
there is another option - one can apply for a year long visa to live, but not work, if one proves that they receive a minimum incone per month (around 500 euros) from another country. you are still obliged to apply for the visa/residency in the same way you would apply for others (police cert/translations etc etc).

The other thought i have is that i have been living here, as a temporary resident (awaiting confirmation of permenancy) for almost a year. i have my tax number and clearance to work. not one question/phonecall/interview has ever taken place asking me what my status is and what i am doing. i have never worked here. Legally a foreigner can bring in U$S5000 per month for spending money, perhaps for this reason they assume there are funds outside?

Like i said in the beginning - my word is not gospel - but i, personally, think having your husband on your visa is highly unlikely to worry them if he can prove he is NOT looking for work here.

good luck - i hope others have more clear responses for you than mine
 

HotYogaTeacher

Active Member
I don't know anything about the law, but we used this attorney and we strongly recommend him. He was polite, honest, extremely good at clearly explaining our options, cheap - really and speaks excellent English. He is knowledgeable and we have been able to go to him for a number of things.
Peace...

Héctor Gabriel Celano
Celano & Asociados - Abogados
Av. Belgrano 634, 2 "B"
C1092AAT - Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires
ARGENTINA
Tel. +54 11 4345 3253 Dir. +54 11 4342 9433
Fax. +54 11 4342 7163 Cel. +54 9 11 4400 9278
From U.S. (305) 600 4738 gabriel@celano.com.ar
 

steveinbsas

Registered
I've done a bit of research today and have the following to add:

If your husband is not going to be "legally employed" or paid in Argentina it's probably a very good idea to include him on your visa to avoid the trips to migraciones and Uruguay. Of course he will need to provide his birth certificate with the seal of the apostille and you might also be asked for your marriage license (also with seal of the apostille). You probably already know about this.

There's nothing to worry about using foreign ATM and credit cards here, though you will pay currency conversion fees as well as ATM fees and may be frustrated at times by withdrawal limits. The $5000 US dollars thebookcellar mentioned is the monthly amount you can legally transfer from abroad, but it's a real hassle (a mountain of paperwork) to do it.

If you husband continues to receive income in the UK he will owe taxes there but not in Argentina. Temporary residents are not taxed on foreign income, but permanent residents are. Of course as a temporary resident (with a work visa) you will be taxed on your Argentine income here. I have been told by officials at my Argentine bank that migraciones has nothing to do with tax issues. Even if your husband is on your visa, unless he is receiving income/being paid in Argentina he should not have to pay taxes here.

If your husband is going to be on your visa you may need to prove to migraciones that you are going to be making enough for the two of you to live here. If he is not on your visa, he shouldn't have to prove a source of income, but then he will only have the tourist visa and face the renewal issue every 90 days.
 

steveinbsas

Registered
Adding a couple thoughts to my previous post.

If you are running short of time prior to your departure, I believe it would be possible to add your husband to your visa even after your arrival in Argentina, thereby upgrading him from the residencia transitoria (tourist visa) to the residencia temporaria (your work visa), thereby eliminating the need for "renewal" every 90 days.


Just be sure to have his birth certificate, UK police report (if required), and your marriage license, all with the seal of Apostille. If you need a UK police report for him and there isn't time to get one before your departure, then just make arrangements for someone to have it receive the seal of Apostille and send it to you here when it is ready.

Then you would need those docs translated and legalized here, but there are "official" translators all over the city and the website is in English:

http://www.traductores.org.ar/nuevo/home/home_en/index.php

Even if someone tells you that your husband must be added to your visa before your arrival here, I know from experience that migraciones can be flexible about things like that. (It's also possible that someone else would tell you that he can only be added after your arrival.) I was told by an attorney that I would have to go to Uruguay to "pick up" my visa rentista at the Argentine consulate there, but migraciones gave it to me here.

If you have questions once you are here, they are the ones to call. 4317-0234/5/6/7/8
 

HoboZero

Newcomer
I wanted to add that I've been here doing the 90 crossing for three years, and was told, angrily I should add, last weekend by the argentine immigrations officer that the laws are changing and a tourist visa is just that and can't be renewed indefinitely. She told me that it was the last time I'd be granted admission.

I've heard that the crackdown was coming. They were going to institute a $135 dollar entrance fee this year, but it never came to fruition. I understand that this is still the plan. It's a matter of when not if.

I'm pursuing a temporary residency now am interested if anyone has gotten one under the "rentista" option. I've got some savings, but can't demonstrate income.
 

bradlyhale

Veteran
HoboZero said:
I wanted to add that I've been here doing the 90 crossing for three years, and was told, angrily I should add, last weekend by the argentine immigrations officer that the laws are changing and a tourist visa is just that and can't be renewed indefinitely. She told me that it was the last time I'd be granted admission.

I've heard that the crackdown was coming. They were going to institute a $135 dollar entrance fee this year, but it never came to fruition. I understand that this is still the plan. It's a matter of when not if.

I'm pursuing a temporary residency now am interested if anyone has gotten one under the "rentista" option. I've got some savings, but can't demonstrate income.
Very interesting. Well, I'd hope that this isn't the case. I really don't understand where the logic is in imposing limits. Yeah, yeah, the U.S. and other countries do it, but why does a country whose inhabitants are so hellbent on distancing themselves from U.S. policies choose to adopt those policies?

Reciprocity fees are not just immature, but they're ineffective. With regard to the U.S., a very small percentage of people travel internationally. Heck, most U.S. citizens don't even have passports. Obviously, foreigners traveling to countries like Chile or Brazil don't like the fees, and they would probably not support them either. (I sure don't!) However, as I said, this group is a minority. The only people that can change these policies are diplomats and the majority of U.S. citizens, both of which are not affected whatsoever by these reciprocity policies. I'd argue that the majority of the population in the U.S. couldn't careless about what goes on outside of their state borders (states' rights), much less the U.S. border. In most cases in the U.S., majority rules.

So, this all leaves me so confused. Most people who live in Argentina, like myself, have telecommute jobs in their home country. Perhaps I'm just hanging out with people who are too much like me, but this seems to be the case. I only know one person who earns Argentine pesos, and that just serves as supplemental income. Everyone else spends dollars from home. Thus, my point is, why would the government want to kick out people who are spending 100% dollars or even a partial amount?

It seems this country just makes the worst business decisions. With tourism significantly down from last year, restricting "tourists" just seems irrational. Allowing the tourists to stay is perhaps Argentina's smartest "foreign" business decision... and we all know they haven't made very good ones in the past.
 
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