Becoming a naturalised citizen and DNI number

Tomas Banks

Registered
Let,s compile a list of places one would need to change a DNI number

Padrón electoral to vote
Bank account
...
Any hospital, clinic or health plan you are associated with, in my case this is already several places. A new one would keep popping up. I'm evaluating if it's worth the effort just to be able to vote in presidential elections. Thanks to all of you for helping me think it through.
 

lost

Registered
  • Anses
  • AFIP
  • Bank accounts
  • Credit cards
  • Car registration
  • Driver's license
  • Insurances
  • Loyalty programs (Jumbo más etc)
  • Phone lines (mobile/landline)
  • Cable/DirecTV
  • Internet
  • Prepaga (health plan)
  • ...
 

jantango

Registered
Any hospital, clinic or health plan you are associated with, in my case this is already several places. A new one would keep popping up. I'm evaluating if it's worth the effort just to be able to vote in presidential elections. Thanks to all of you for helping me think it through.
Not only would you be able to vote in the presidential election, you would also be able to obtain an Argentine passport.

I ordered my first phone service with Telefonica in 2002 when the only document number I had was my US passport. They still have that number assigned to my Movistar Hogar account although the passport expired. It doesn't make any difference to them.

At the first visit to a doctor or hospital with a new DNI, you can explain you have citizenship and a new number. Simple.


wrong info, again
A Nigerian couple are my neighbors, and both are naturalized citizens. He has been here for 25 years, and his DNI begins with 18. She has been here for 15 years, and her DNI begins with 19, the same as mine. Both voted in the presidential election in 2019.

The conclusion is that any permanent resident in Argentina who gets naturalized will have to deal with a new DNI number.
 
Last edited:

Tomas Banks

Registered
  • Anses
  • AFIP
  • Bank accounts
  • Credit cards
  • Car registration
  • Driver's license
  • Insurances
  • Loyalty programs (Jumbo más etc)
  • Phone lines (mobile/landline)
  • Cable/DirecTV
  • Internet
  • Prepaga (health plan)
  • ...
It’s really unfortunate you would have to do go through all of those changes just because you opt for the “painless” process of becoming a citizen. It would be easier traveling to some countries like Cuba as an Argentine, but maybe I just won’t go there. Thanks for helping me think this through...
 

lost

Registered
Not only would you be able to vote in the presidential election, you would also be able to obtain an Argentine passport.



A Nigerian couple are my neighbors, and both are naturalized citizens. He has been here for 25 years, and his DNI begins with 18. She has been here for 15 years, and her DNI begins with 19, the same as mine. Both voted in the presidential election in 2019.

The conclusion is that any permanent resident in Argentina who gets naturalized will have to deal with a new DNI number.
But not all men have a DNI that begins with 18. That is the wrong info. So, it looks like it is random 18 or 19. Are there any other two digits that were assigned to naturalized Argentinians (besides 18 and 19)?
 

jantango

Registered
I was unable to locate the chart that designates certain series of numbers to residents, citizens, and naturalized citizens. it makes no difference. The OP would have to get a new number and new DNI for citizenship.
 

dilmah

Registered
I'm evaluating if it's worth the effort just to be able to vote in presidential elections.
A person can be stripped of his permanent residency status (e.g. if he spends too much time outside of Argentina).
Citizenship -- not so easy.

Citizen of Argentina has easy pathway to establish residency in any Mercosur country (e.g. Brazil).

Also it's always nice to have second passport just in case first passport gets annulled, invalidated or expired.

It would be easier traveling to some countries like Cuba as an Argentine, but maybe I just won’t go there.
also Russia
 
Top