Booster shot in CABA

Alby

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Hey! I don't mind answering, just saw the question now.

It's been frustrating. I had COVID in early 2020, and long COVID, I didn't feel "normal" until October last year. This time the big difference is (so far) no cough and I can breathe, but I'm very fatigued and can feel my blood pressure rise when doing simple things like making my bed or getting up to get a glass of juice. Also lots of phlegm.

I'm pretty sure I got it from my husband who was likely asymptomatic. He works with several children that are developmentally disabled/wards
of the state, and their group home has had several cases of COVID since early 2020, in addition to the constant illnesses kids get in general.
I'm not a partier, nor have I been to big events with lots of people, and I work from home, so that's all I can think of.

I hadn't been sleeping well around Christmas Eve and on Christmas, then on Sunday I went to the hospital with a fever of almost 104º and feeling very confused, dizzy, and dehydrated despite drinking lots of fluids. I went to the hospital and was taken in immediately due to my fever/dehydration, and given IV fluids. I had a murmur too so they kept me for observations until it dissipated as my fever came under control. They thought it might have been a respiratory infection, possibly COVID, but again, no cough so we weren't sure. I was given a PCR test to be sure, and came home in the middle of the night Monday AM. When I woke up later Monday I found out I had tested positive.

Like I said, I received both doses of the AstraZeneca vaccine, one in June, the second in September. I got side effects both times, fever, tired, etc. and was wanting my booster, but it hadn't been 150 days yet (it's now be lowered to 120 as of today, a bit late for me) so I was hoping I'd be fine, but here we are.

I personally think for 2 reasons there are a lot more breakthrough cases than the ~2% that's reported on average/why it's still rare to hear about them:

I think the vaccines are likely effective enough that many people are asymptomatic, or, like me, assuming it is something other than COVID (i.e. allergies) when they did in fact contract it, resulting in cases to go unreported. And I also think some people are reluctant to share that, despite being double or triple vaccinated, they still managed to contract COVID because people will assume they were reckless, or they fear it will just be used by anti-vaxxers to claim the vaccines don't work anyways, so why get them. Of course for the later, people who've completed high school science know that's not how vaccines work.

Today I seem to have fully lost my sense of taste/smell, which I had a feeling was coming last night. I'm just tired and anxious because I don't want a repeat of last year's long COVID, I don't think I can handle that again...
Thanks very much for that information. A very sobering report that ought to give any reader reason to be concerned. You had Covid, long Covid. Then you had two vaccination shots, the most recent only three months ago. And now you've got a another case that sent you to hospital and is still developing after five days. So much for vaccination breakthrough cases only being mild. Perhaps it was Delta.
All the best for your recovery.
 

Quilombo

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If you have had the vaccine and the virus aren't you basically immune for a while?

Yes, for example after my first COVID infection several of my co-workers tested positive a couple of months later, and despite being
in direct contact with them for over 8 hours a day I tested negative assumingely due to the antibodies I still had. The problem I think
we're collectively facing is mutations, where you'll still get many benefits from being vaccinated (i.e. you won't destroy your lungs or
organs, and you won't die), but you can still become infected and in turn transmit it to other people, especially if your symptoms are
mild from being vaccinated and you assume it's just a cold or allergies.

Thanks very much for that information. A very sobering report that ought to give any reader reason to be concerned. You had Covid, long Covid. Then you had two vaccination shots, the most recent only three months ago. And now you've got a another case that sent you to hospital and is still developing after five days. So much for vaccination breakthrough cases only being mild. Perhaps it was Delta.
All the best for your recovery.

Thank you; I know there are a number of vaccine hesitant and/or anti-vaxxer members, and I would encourage them to re-evaluate
their positions; this was a difficult Christmas as I stayed home since I was feeling unwell (thankfully so), and my husband and his
siblings tried to put on a brave face for the kids while celebrating Christmas without their father for the first time in their lives, as he
passed from COVID earlier this year. Statistically speaking most BA Expats users are, I'm assuming, 50+, and that being said, as
hard as COVID has hit me, the reality is an infection hits someone in their 20s and someone 50+ very differently, without being
morbid.
 

BsAs2022

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Just wanted to add that I know quite a few people (10-15) back in the UK who are double jabbed (even triple) and have caught covid (two for the second time), particularly in recent weeks with the Omicron surge. Luckily, they've all had mild cases, most likely thanks to being vaccinated. If helpful, their most common symptoms seem to be some combination of sneezing, headache, runny nose, congestion, scratchy throat, and sometimes a brief fever that passes quite quickly.
 

Brian_is_here

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Even if you get covid you should still get a booster. the immune response your body had to covid isn't predictable. However the response to the vaccine is well studied.

Imagine this: You've been sunbathing and being a super healthy and strong person who this week, your immune system is a fine tuned machine. You get covid, but your amazing immune system eats it up before it can reproduce. No harm no foul and you're cleaned up from covid a week later with minimal or no symptoms.

Then 6 months later its dead of winter and youve been stuck indoors for weeks. Your immune system is weaker from not eating well, not exercising, not getting sunlight, etc. You get covid a second time but your immune system doesn't have all troops on deck.

Then you get laid out with a case of bad covid.

The vaccines teach your immune system urgency by giving it all the knowledge it needs on hand right away.

Anyways, I'm not a doctor. I just don't like dying. So go get these harmless shots and not die. (I'm at 2x J&J and 2x Sputnik).
 

lunar

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Imagine this: You've been sunbathing and being a super healthy and strong person who this week, your immune system is a fine tuned machine. You get covid, but your amazing immune system eats it up before it can reproduce.
If you have a positive PCR test, obviously it can reproduce.

Even if you get covid you should still get a booster. the immune response your body had to covid isn't predictable. However the response to the vaccine is well studied.
It is difficult to call "well studied" the response to all the combinations of vaccines people are doing right now. In the best case scenario, there are some individual papers.

As to whether you should get a booster after an active case of covid, if you want to be scientific you can check your level of antibodies and compare with some typical levels after the vaccination.
 

Brian_is_here

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on the one hand, you have a vaccine that has killed very few to very rare side effects on the other you have a virus that has killed millions and counting and more with annoying long term ailments like lung transplants.

Scientific studies and billions of people who have taken a dose without dying or long term ailments like lung transplants. Canada has several studies showing mix'n'match working for them: https://www.canada.ca/en/public-hea...apid-response-interchangeability/summary.html . Here's one from US teams https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.10.10.21264827v1.full.pdf

I believe the science for getting a booster (or just vaccinated) after covid is "Yes". https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/70/wr/mm7032e1.htm

The answer to "should you get vaccinated for covid-19?" Yes. If you're eligible for a vaccine or booster, get it.
Several Reasons:
1. Don't Die
2. Stay Alive
3. Vaccines won't kill you
4. Covid Might.

Again, I'm not a doctor. This is not medical advice, do your own research (but maybe not from Joe Rogan).
 

iggysnacks

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hey folks. I'm here with just a passport and one j&j shot - hoping to figure out a way to get vaccinated with a moderna or a Pfizer as a booster shot. i know there's no official protocol for it, but is anyone aware of a way i can get a booster shot in or around CABA? a
 

dsp27

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hey folks. I'm here with just a passport and one j&j shot - hoping to figure out a way to get vaccinated with a moderna or a Pfizer as a booster shot. i know there's no official protocol for it, but is anyone aware of a way i can get a booster shot in or around CABA? a
At this number on whatsapp +54 9 11 5050-0147
Register you JJ vaccine with the city, then padronarte with you passport number. They will call you in a week or two to get the booster. Or you can cal 147 next week and ask.
 

iggysnacks

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At this number on whatsapp +54 9 11 5050-0147
Register you JJ vaccine with the city, then padronarte with you passport number. They will call you in a week or two to get the booster. Or you can cal 147 next week and ask.
I've tried navigating the bot, but always get stuck declaring my vaccine because i don't have a DNI and i haven't been able to use my passport
 
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