can i live in Argentina?

#1
Hi everyone. I've just discovered this site in my desperate search for information on moving to Argentina and my hopes have since been reignited after coming to many dead ends. I fell in love with the country after an incredible 6 month travelling experience a couple of years ago and I haven't had a single day of not thinking about it since my return. I thought that after returning home to Scotland, all these dreams of moving to Argentina permanently would slowly fade away as I settle back into the life I had here before but they have not. Infact they have grown stronger as time has gone by and my circumstances have recently changed meaning it is now actually possible for me uproute and do it! But I have so many questions regarding immigration which remain unanswered. I keep hearing and reading conflicting information on my own situation and the possibilities so maybe someone out there can help me? The main question I need answered is: Is it possible for me to move to Argentina? I have no family or friends there nor a job lined up. I have some money in the bank and I intend to set up in business and buy a house. Can anyone please help me or point me in the right direction? Thankyou, Rob.
 

Guest
#2
Can you?

I had no family or friends here, only some money in the bank. I'm doing just fine. You can stay 90 days, apply for a cheap 90 day extension, then after 90 more days take a short bus ride to Colonia in Uruguay for lunnch to be rewarded another 90 days. Repeat process indefinitely. Or the easier and cheaper route: simply be 'illegal' and pay the 50 peso fine when you leave. The right direction is the airport. Come on down. You'll figure it out when you get here.
 
#3
Yes you can come. This is Argentina and immigration is chaotic and rules inconsistently enforced. What kind of business are you involved in? If you plan on doing business in Argentina you will need to get legal immigration status otherwise you'll have to do everything illegally. If you have some work that can be done via internet you will be in a good situation however if you are dependent on the localk economy you will find that it is tough to do business here and hard to make much money.
 
#4
Rob,

From my experience relocating to Europe, this advice, as dodgy as it may seem, is probably quite reasonable.
If you do go ahead and do it, please let me know if you stumble upon any unforseen " issues" , as we are considering doing the same as you. Maybe we can exchange emails if each of us find out anything new?

Good luck....!
 
#5
Hi all. Thanks for the responses to my questions and my hopes are now back up again. From what I am hearing from you and reading on this site it does seem quite easy to just keep renewing the 90 day visa by crossing the border. But when they stamp my passport everytime I return is there no danger in not being granted the visa as they can easily see what I'm up to? I'd rather not be an illegal alien and my intentions of setting up in business may not be possible if I take this approach. So does anyone know if these are my only options or is it possible to become a legal resident?
 
#6
Rob,

Check the immigration law (Ley 25.871, Articulo 23). Essentially, you can get a 3 years resident visa if you will invest 102,000 pesos into your own company here. You can also apply to a resident visa as a "rentista" if you have a permanent source of income outside of the country.
 
#7
thanks for that admin but my Spanish is still very limited so I can't get through the (Ley 25.871, Articulo 23). Is there an English translation anywhere? it sounds like there are a number of options for me now so thanks to everyone who replied. I am working up until May '06 then I'm jumping on the 1st flight over there. I know it'll be coming into winter over there but I'm sure it'll be better than a Scottish summer anyway!
Rob
 

Marc

Active Member
#8
I came back to Argentina for the first time in 30 years this May. I lived here as a boy from 74-76, and have now decided to live here with the girl I met in 76. Strange, but true. I am English, and hope to get work in English discussion, conversation.But my point is to help Robster. We discovered that the quickest way to get a work visa, is to get a job offer in BA, get a contract drawn up, get a gestor in BA to prepare the paperwork and then send all to Migraciones here in BA, which will later be sent to where you live, and you then have to take it all to your local Argentine consulate where you currently reside, in order to get the work visa. This MUST be done outside Argentina. Once you have the visa de trabajo, you can then apply for your DNI (nat identity card) so you can open bank account etc. This appears to be the quickest route...about 2 to 3 months.We can email privately if you wish. Hope this helps.Marc
 
#9
Marc. Thanks for the reply to my original querie and it adds to the spectrum of advice I have received so far! The only thing with regard to the visa de trabajo is that I don't wish to look for a job in Argentina. I am not skilled in anything that would be employable and I don't know how easy/difficult it would be to find a decent job?
My intentions are to set up in business as that is what I do but this could be a good way to get my foot in the Argentine door.

Good luck to you and your new life in Argentina. I hope that one day I'll be settling down in my favorite country on earth! My plan is to leave Scotland next May so I'll have to be patient.
Thanks again,
Rob.
 
#10
I wouldn't get too hung up on doing things the correct way as you would in the UK or US. This is Argentina.