Cost of Living by Lifestyle

#1
What does it cost to live in BsAs? What would be helpful is to know what it takes to live by lifestyle. In other words, what does it take to live in 1) Student lifestyle - ie US standards 2) Middle class - ie nice apartment, occassional nice entertainment etc 3) Upper Middle class - ie really nice 2 bedroom place, lots of entertainment etc
Thanks
 

Mike1

Active Member
#2
"Conforme" said:
What does it cost to live in BsAs? What would be helpful is to know what it takes to live by lifestyle. In other words, what does it take to live in 1) Student lifestyle - ie US standards 2) Middle class - ie nice apartment, occassional nice entertainment etc 3) Upper Middle class - ie really nice 2 bedroom place, lots of entertainment etc
Thanks
1. Cheap as long as you have the almighty dollar backing.
2. Semi-cheap but costs of electronics will kill you.3. Same as the States if not more, depends on what you spend money on & what you're earning, since it'll be in pesos. I hope this help.
 
#3
The biggest challenge newbies faces here is renting a decent apartment at a decent price. Temporary (furnished) apartments are generally available from one week to six months. The weekly rate can be as much as half the monthly rate, yet still cheaper than a hotel. A foreigner here on a 90 day tourist visa and trying to rent for more than six months is an oddity( though they do exist), and I believe you need to be a "resident" (or have a resident visa) to sign a two year lease, though there are probably a few exceptions to this "rule". (Why would an owner give someone here on a 90 day tourist visa a two year lease in the first place?) Long term rentals are rarely furnished, so anyone renting long term would also have to buy a lot of stuff. What will you do with it when you want to leave? Sell it at a loss? Walk away from it? Anyway, here are some "estimates" for furnished apartments/six month rental: I'm only including San Telmo, Palermo and Recoleta here because that's where the greatest selection of temporary apartments are located. I am applying US standards to all price groups, so "middle class" neighborhoods of Buenos Aires are not included. All figures are in US dollars, and though everything is just my opinion, its based on a lot of market research.
1) Student lifestyle - ie US standards: $400-$600 for a one or two room apartment in San Telmo. $600-$800 for smaller apartment in Recoleta or Palermo. 2) Middle class - ie nice
apartment, occassional nice entertainment etc: $600-$800 for one bedroom in Palermo and $800-$1200 in Recloeta. (San Telmo does not meet US "middle class" standards.) Also, I would exclude the "faculdad de medicina" area of Recoleta...ie between Cordoba and Santa Fe.)
3) Upper Middle class -
ie really nice 2 bedroom place, lots of entertainment etc: $1200-$2,000+ Better sections of Palermo and Recoleta

How much you spend on a daily basis depends on where and what you eat and drink. If you shop carefully and cook at home, eating in Buenos Aires can be cheaper than the US by 30-50%. Even if you eat in restaurants daily, the same rate of "savings" when compared to the US can apply. Not having a car will make a huge difference.
 
#5
Here is the link to a great site where you can see many rentals in various Buenos Aires neighborhoods:www.tratodirecto.com.ar/Just above the listings you can select the number of people (pasajeros) and just below the listings if you select #50 they will all be displayed on one page. The nightly rates are shown in the column on the right, and the weekly and monthly rates (semanal/mensual) are included in the text. The site is still only available in Spanish, but the rental rates of the apartments here are, in some cases, significantly lower than the temporary apartments found on sites in English (draw your own conclusions...and practice you Spanish!).