Do Argentines Know the meaning of fresh

#1
Is it possible to buy anything fresh here? E local cafe bar makes scones, just like home, but for one thing, they refuse to sell them untill they are a day old. One day we went in and asked for escones and they told us we could not have them bacause they were still warm. When we said that we like them like that, they looked at us with horrror, shrugged, but refused to let us have them warm.
 

nikad

Registered
#2
"tangobob" said:
Is it possible to buy anything fresh here? E local cafe bar makes scones, just like home, but for one thing, they refuse to sell them untill they are a day old. One day we went in and asked for escones and they told us we could not have them bacause they were still warm. When we said that we like them like that, they looked at us with horrror, shrugged, but refused to let us have them warm.
I buy my daily bread while it is still warm from the baker store...
 
#5
to answer your querry tangobob, no they dont seem to understand fresh. they deliver food to stores on flatbed trucks burning under the hot sun. i was in an agricultural area in the pampa last week. the supermarket had rotting shrivled up vegetables. i was home a few months ago, it was not the case. i bought fresh fish, fresh fruit and vegetables. its a matter of doign it right. try telling an argentine about another way of doing something, you might as well talk to a block of cement.
My advice, bring peptol bismol from home and keep your fingers crossed while shpping here as quality and standards are low.
 
#6
Fresh? Hard to find fresh food in BA. For an agricultural country the quality of vegetables is pathetic. The supermarket is the worst. What passes for lettuce, tomatoes etc. in supermarkets like Disco is a disgrace. You can get better vegetables from street vendors. Fresh baked goods can also be difficult to get. Bakeries routinely pass off day old goods. They aren't that good when they're fresh - they use a lot of lard here, very little or no butter.
 
#7
I'm so tired of all you whiners bitiching about not getting freshness of vegatable or warm Crumpets here in BsAs. I'm an a U.S citizen, I'm ashamed of you dumb **** I would tell you how stupid you are but Igor won't let me. You want fresh vegatables, head north you can get a fresh head of lettace for $7 pesos. Why, can't you afford to live in on what your daddy left you in so you won't have to work for a living. Maybe you could get food stamp n the US.
KMA, DQ
 
#8
DQ please I was not whinging, just an observation. It really seems to me that the Argentines do not like thier bread and pastries fresh.
I agree with Sergio you can get better veg from the street vendors, but if that is the case, why not buy from them? they are cheaper as well.
 

nikad

Registered
#9
"JG" said:
to answer your querry tangobob, no they dont seem to understand fresh. they deliver food to stores on flatbed trucks burning under the hot sun. i was in an agricultural area in the pampa last week. the supermarket had rotting shrivled up vegetables. i was home a few months ago, it was not the case. i bought fresh fish, fresh fruit and vegetables. its a matter of doign it right. try telling an argentine about another way of doing something, you might as well talk to a block of cement.
My advice, bring peptol bismol from home and keep your fingers crossed while shpping here as quality and standards are low.
there are certain stores that are not as careful as they should be and if you detect that you should report it to the Direccion Nacional de Bromatologia http://www.alimentosargentinos.gov.ar/
As much as certain vegetables lack of beauty, bare in mind that a lot of them are not full of hormones and genetically altered ( I´d rather eat healthy despite the outer beauty of the product ). Same goes with meats.
As a rule of thumb, veggies, fruit, meats are always better at small stores than at supermarkets. It is just that a lot of people don´t want to spend extra time picking good products.
On a side note, most people here buy they bread just baked ( in the mornign ) as well as pastries and criossants, so I am very curious as to where you guys are shopping for this stuff (?)
In general argentines always look for the freshest groceries, and they are widely available ( in any barrio housewives go shopping for groceries everyday to get the freshest veggies, bread, etc )
Please provide some more info, as I said before, I really never heard before that fresh products where hard to get (! )