english teaching in Institutes?

irishvan

Registered
Arrived 3 weeks ago and have had no problem getting business jobs. I have just read somewhere that the money is better teaching at institutes and obviously no travelling. However it also said that the inst. usually employ locals. Does anybody have any information about this?
 

KatharineAnn

Registered
Let me offer my humble opionion. I´ve been teaching here for a year, and I´ve found it quite difficult to find a typical English classroom class like you would imagine at an institute. You´re right, they do tend to hire Argentines for that. Why? Two reasons. First, it´s not as necessary that the teacher be native for beginning to intermediate levels. Second, they can pay them less than a native will demand (this is undoubtedly the case).

As a native teacher you will have a lot more luck getting one-on-one classes, because those are the advanced speakers who want a native English speaker specifically, and are willing to shell out big for it. Or, of course, companies, that pay for their employees private classes, because they can. You´ll get more classes more quickly teaching in companies, for sure. Of course, good, non-business private students are often a lot more fun, fulfilling, and loyal.

That said, I only teach part time now (a few hours a week) because it is such an unstable job that I prefer to do a part-time stable job, with some teaching on the side to mix things up, and because my students CAN be a lot of fun, when I´m not all worried about the craziness of scheduling it all!

But if your heart is set on group classroom classes in an institute, keep at it and I´m sure you´ll find something. The tendency is to hire Argentines for this, but there´s always someone desperately needing a teacher...
 

cujodu

Registered
Depends on the situation. I teach both personally at home and professionally in an institute. The institutes, in my opinion, go ga-ga for native speakers, many of their students specifically request native speakers so they need to keep hiring because after you've worked there about 6 months you'll hate it because, 1) the classes are usually located in businesses throughout the city and require anywhere from 30 min. to an hour to get to depending on where you live, each way, each class, few are held in classrooms at the institutes; 2) the pay is terrible, average from what i've seen is about $26 pesos per hour (less than $8 USD per hour for all that travelling); and, 3) Once you see the Argentine work ethic, you won't care much for working with them, it's just a cultural difference and I'm not attacking them for it, it works(?) for them. Privately, you can charge more but it's more difficult to get students.

Yes, this is my own personal experience, if anyone has a different experience feel free to post.
 

KatharineAnn

Registered
I agree entirely with the above poster. With the added comment that teaching in businesses is the best way to feel unappreciated and disrespected as a teacher. Cancellations, talking on the phone in the middle of class, leaving class in the middle, are not uncommon. And if you are under the age of 30, you will most likely be the victim of chauvinistic and ageist remarks that undermine your ability and authority as a teacher. If you are older, you´ll be more respected and might enjoy yourself more.
 

Bitty Cabrera

Registered
If you are older you are not respected either!! And painfully for myself, since I was born here, I agree with newcomer Cujodu, no work ethics, no money, no respect or consideration, sucks!!
 

irishvan

Registered
Im grateful for everybodys response but what I meant by 'institute' was teaching in one place,(would language school be a better term?) not travelling as in what I call 'business english'.
I will be interested to find out about the Argentinian work ethic as against the Spanish as I taught business english in Madrid for 2 years.
I am formally qualified, have a university degree and 12 years experience and so far have only been offered 25 pesos an hour. Should I be asking for more?
Thanks
 

RWS

Registered
irishvan said:
Arrived 3 weeks ago and have had no problem getting business jobs. . . .
I'd dearly like to know how you secured those business jobs, travel or no travel!
 

Bairesgirl

Registered
The following add was posted today.
Apparently all classes in Puerto Madero.

Selex Idiomas
Profesor/a nativo americano de inglés Selex busca profesores nativos americanos de inglés para dictar clases en Puerto Madero.
Fecha:6 de marzo de 2009Localidad:Capital FederalProvincia:Capital FederalSalario:a definirComienzo:a definirDuración:a definirTipo de trabajo:Por HorasSolicitudes:enviar curriculum por correo electrónicoEmpresa:Selex IdiomasContacto:SolTeléfono:Fax:Correo-E:
 

KatharineAnn

Registered
irishvan said:
Im grateful for everybodys response but what I meant by 'institute' was teaching in one place,(would language school be a better term?) not travelling as in what I call 'business english'.
I will be interested to find out about the Argentinian work ethic as against the Spanish as I taught business english in Madrid for 2 years.
I am formally qualified, have a university degree and 12 years experience and so far have only been offered 25 pesos an hour. Should I be asking for more?
Thanks
I understood what you meant and that´s why I explained that it´s a lot harder to find classes in language schools (non-travel, classroom classes, you know, like you´d expect teaching to be). Buenos Aires is full of Argentinians who speak English quite well, who studied the profesorado, and are willing to work for a lot less than you are.

That said, if you received offers of no more than $25 an hour, you should keep looking. You are a very qualified teacher and should be able to demand $30. That said, there´s a lot of luck in the whole game here...
 

mendozanow

Registered
As someone who has been teaching for over a year and a half in Mendoza, I have found that in my experience the comments are valid here as well, except that often the wages are even a bit lower here.

This is the big hiring time now (the silly season, as there are all kinds of games that desperate directors play until they settle on the right teacher for the right course, their word is usually worthless), the classes are starting or starting over the next week. The other secndary time for hiring is in late July and early August after the short winter break. Usually, the language institutes are only interested in Argentinian teachers for contracts , and prefer to hire Foriegn native teachers for individual course, such as advanced regular or conversation, or for private individuals who feel they want a native teacher.

The big battle I always have to fight as a gringo applying for a course is that we gringo teachers as perceived as difficult, only going to be here for a while (even if we tell them we are permanaent residents or here for a determined period), untrained (even if we show them our credentials), poor at teaching grammar (there is some basis for this, as we are not taught grammar as a subject generally in anglo schools), and that we do not correct pronunciation (largely a myth). Thus we have to fight many myths and prejudices, and this is a credibility game we have to play on our part. Have any refernce letters and qualifications copìed and hand them over, as Argentinians are children who live in the present. Do not expect them to telephone you back as promised, you have to follow-up to a greater degree than would appear reasonable. NEVER expect a reply on email, as email etiquette does not exist in Argenitna.

Many Argentinian English teachers are good, but few have good accents or can teach pronunciation well. How many, for instance, pronounce "would" as "good"...probably close to 95%. also, Argentine teachers often make up definitions for idiomatic or specialized vocabulary. So, there are sometimes valid reasons for students asking for native teachers, even if the locals are grudging about this.

As a strategy, I am trying to work for more sensitve (and sometimes smaller) institutions, and to develop a small group of clients of respecting , respectable and reliable students, who can pay me directly, which avoids all kinds of complications. The trouble is that you will get burned often as part of the process.

Good luck. You have to be very careful, flexible, patient and have a good sense of humour.
 
Top